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March 21, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-21

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LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

f142 ML
ThE

Michigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

Vol. XXIII, No. 120. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENTS

VARSITY READY
TO CLASH WITH
CORNELL STARS

Athletes Are Trained1

to Tip Top of

Condition in Preparation for
Meet T1 omorrow
Evening
MEN TAKE LIGHT WORKOUT
FOR LAST INDOOR PRACTICE.
Personnel of Relay Team to Depend
on Showing of Men in
First Events
Trainer Farrel will have his men
keyed up to the highest notch of effi-
ciency for the clash with Cornell
in Waterman gym tomorrow evening.
The last indoor practice of the season
was held yesterday afternoon, as bar-
ring a possible return of old Boreas
and his chilling winds, the cinder men
will desert the stuffy gym for their
Ferry field haunts the first of next
week.
Seward has been a little out of shape
since the Syracuse meet, so has been
given a rest from strenuous practice
this week. Trainer Farrell has been
watching him carefully and has no
doubt of his regaining form by Satur-
day. Bond was getting away from the
marks in good style yesterday and and
should figure in the running. Hughes,
a last year freshman, will appear in
the dash as a member of the Varsity
team for the first time. Lapsley, with
his leg not entirely healed, has shown
enough speed in practice to deserve
consideration as a contender in the
sprint across the gym floor.
Believing that Craig works better
in a meet when he has not been put
through a hard course of training,
Farrell has kept "Jimmy" from the
hurdles since Wednesday, and confines
him to practicing starts.
The high-jumpers,Sargent and White,
were also granted a well-earned rest
by the trainer, and have spent little
time at the gym during the past week.
These men aie banked on to win first
and second in the leaping event.
Kohler and Smith finished their
preparation for the clash with the
easterners, yesterday, and a~e both'in
condition to extend their best efforts
The pole-vaulters, Cook and Daskam,
are primed to the moment and will
nerve themselves to supreme exertions
to out-vault Fritz of Cornell.
In the middle and long distance rac-
es, the Michigan entrants leave noth-
ing to be desired in the way of good
physical shape. Jansen will probably
not run in the hurdles but will be
utilized in either the quarter or half
mile with the emphasis on the quarter.
Haff and Baier will also run in this
event with Haff the predicted winner.
Carver is in condition to do his best
in defending the Maize and Blue
against the onslaughts of Jones of
Cornell. "Heinie" Haimbaugh, accom-
panied by Smith, will run in the mile.
Both are in the best of condition to
reap a heavy harvest for Michigan in
this event.
The personnel of the relay team has
not yet been made up by Farrel, as he
prefers to wait until the night of the
meet, and base his choice on the show-
ing of his men.
Union Members Play Cards Tonight.
Union members have the opportuni-
ty of attending the regular Friday
night informal card party tonight at
7:30. Five hundred and bridge will
be the games played and prizes will be
given to the two men holding high
score.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor--Friday,gen-
erally fair.
lUn iverit y Observatory-Thursday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 39.0; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 64.0;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 39.0; wind velocity 15 miles
per hour.
Senior Women Hold "Get-Together."
Senior women to the number of 30
attended the sewing circle at Barbour
gym yesterday afternoon. These "get-
togethers" are held every three weeks
as a means of enabling women of the
graduating class to suggest ideas of
domestic science and to become bet-
ter acquainted with each other.
TO SPEAK TONIGHT
IN PEACE CONTEST

Paul B. Blas3ai, '14,
sent ylli-lgn
Ypsi l'i

Will
at

Repre-I

SEATS RESERVED FOR ROOTERS.
Paul 3. Blanshard, '14, whose broth-
er won the University contest last
night, will represent Michigan tonight
in the state peace contest at Ypsilanti.
The speakers, their subjects, and the
order in which they will speak are as
fcllows: J. E. Luidens, of the State
Normal, "The Stewards of Peace;"
George E. Taft, Olivet, "The Interna-
tional Mind;" Paul B. Blanshard, Uni-
versity of Michigan, "The Evolution of
Patriotism;" Marshall R. Reed, Albion,
"The Warriors Protest Against War;"
J. W. Carmichael, Hillsdale, "Univer-
sal Peace;" and A. I. Margolis, M. A.
C., "War and Poverty."
The contest tonight will be held in
Normal Hall, Ypsilanti, at 8:00 o'clock,
or as soon thereafter as the Michigan
delegation arrives, which will leave
Ann Arbor on the 7:40 o'clock car.
One hundred seats have been reserved
for rooters from the university.
FIRST ll{ESS REHEARSAL OF
OPERA TO BE LE)LD SUNDAY..
Director St. John is Pleased With
Results Shown at Yesterday's
Rehearsal With Orchestra.
"Contrarie Mary" will have its first
dress rehearsal Sunday afternoon at
the Whitney theater. The men taking
part will at this time don the frills
and feathers of feminine attire, and
go through the action of the 1913 Mich-
igan Union opera before the freshly
painted scenery, which is expected to
arrive from Detroit tomorrow. Fol-
lowing the afternoon's rehearsal, the
men in the production will adjourn to
the Union, where they will be the
guests of the management at dinner.
Both acts of the opera were re-
hearsed at the Union last evening. The
orchestra was used for the first time
in connection with the rest of the per-
formance, and the results obtained
were gratifying to Director St. John.
Practically all of yesterday after-
noon was occupied in drilling the cast
in its lines, and teaching special fig-
ures to feature groups in the choruses.
The "Wooden Leg" chorus went
through its gyrations with a gusto that
nearly wrecked the canvas on the Un-
ion dance floor and the other stunts
were enacted with equal vim.
Webster Society to Meet This Evening.
The Webster society will hold its
weekly meeting tonight in its rooms in
the law building at 7:45 o'clock. An
especially large program has been ar-
ranged.

BALL PROTEGES
GO OUTSIDE FOR
STIFFPRCTICE
Varsity Baseball Squad Again Comes
Out of Winter Quarters and
Plays Hard Ten
Inning Contest.
COACH KEEPS CANDIDATES
KEYED UP TO HIGH PITCH.
No Definite Selections are Made to Fill
Vacancies For Annual
Trip South.
Ten innings of real baseball was the
program for the Varsity baseball squad
on its second day out of doors. The
men who hope to make the nine that
will invade Dixie during the spring
vacation reported early at south Fer-
ry field, and were given a stiff after-
noon's drill.
No score was kept of the game be-
tween two chosen nines, but from the
pep that Coach Rickey instilled into
his proteges and the speed he kept
them keyed up to, it may be safely
judged that the men got a great deal
of benefit from the work.
As yet Rickey has not chosen men
for the vacant positions left open by
the graduation of last year's players.
Pontius and Stewart were given a drill
at first base, Hughitt at third, Duncan-
son and McQueen at second and How-
ard in the outfield, during a portion of
yesterday's practice. As it is probable
that third and first will be the only
hard positions to fill, Rickey is devot-
ing a good deal of time watching the
men perform at these stations.
Sayers and Metcalf did the mound
duty yesterday, and as it is probable
that one of these two men will be tak-
en on the southern trip as the fourth
pitcher their work was watched with
interest.
Rickey will chase his men out of
doors every day the weather will per-
mit it, and it is probable that a daily
battle will be staged on south Ferry
field, until the regular diamond is put
in shape to use.
B. V. 1)'S WILL DANCE TONIGHT.
Annual Formal Bal to Include Many
Near Features.
Barristers, Vulcans and Druids will
combine in staging their yearly formal
ball at the Union tonight. Unusual
enthusiasm has been put into the prep-
aration by the management an the
decorations, arranged, are elegant and
elaborate.
Music for the evening will be fur-
nished by the Wright Saxophone Trio
of Columbus. Stunts and favors will be
the order of the evening, and each of
the different societies will vie with the
others in the endeavor to introduce the
most effective feature. Programs, spe-
cially designed by Harold B. Abbot,
will be the eloquent reminders of the
order of dances. The honorary facul-
ty members of the three organizations
will be the chaperones of the affair.
PROF. TURNER STATES THAT
HONOR SYSTEM IS SUCCESS.
Speaking to his class in English
history yesterday morning, Prof. E. R.
Turner said that the honor system in
examinations as adopted by his class,
had proven, in his opinion, a decided
success.
He made the statement that he
thought that the great majority of stu-

dents had taken the examinations in
better spirit than previously. Prof.
Turner admitted that a partial failure
of the scheme came when a part of the
class declined to enforce the system.

Percival
Time

V. Blanshard, '14, For First
in Years, Obtains United
Decision in Annual
Oratory Final.

WINS CONTEST
BY UNANIMOUS
VOTE OF JUDGES

WILL REPRESENT MICHIGAN
IN BIG LEAGUE CONTEST.
H. C. Goodenow, '13, is Given Second
Honors and W. C. Mullendore,'14,
Honorable Mention.
Percival V. Blanshard, '14, won the
University Oratorical contest last night
by a unanimous decision, which is the
first time in the 23 years these contests
have been held that the opinion of
the judges has been united.
With the honor of first place in the
university contest goes the honor of
representing the University of Michi-
gan in the Northern Oratorical League,
a Kauffman testimonial of $100.00, and
the Chicago alumni medal.
Blanshard will deliver his oration,
"Christianity and the Social Crisis,"
at the league contest which is to be
held this year at Oberlin, Ohio, on May
2.
H. E. Goodenow, '13, won second
honors and a Kauffman testimonial of
$50.00 with his oration "Unrealized
Self." He will go to Oberlin as alter-
nate. W. C. Mullendore, '14, who spoke
on "The Degredation of Our National
Honor" was given honorable mention
by the judges, which is an unusual
recognition. The five contestants last
night were selected from 22 competi-
tors in the class contests held last
month.
U.S. Judge Arthur J. Tuttle, '92-'95L,
presided, and paid a tribute to the
work of Prof. Trueblood in pro-
ducing Michigan's winning debat-
ers and orators in the 30 years he has
been connected with the university.
The judges were Asst. Dean W. H.
Butts, of the engineering department;
Professors J. L. Markley, J. S. Reeves,
and W. H. Henderson, of the literary
department; and Supt. H. M. Slauson
of the high school.
DISCUSS FACULTY SUPERVISION.
Senior Engineers Listen to Talks on
Increasing Control.
At the senior engineer dinner held
last evening at the Union, "Cam" Trib-
le, '13, suggested that the engineers
follow the example of the lits in peti-
tioning the University Senate for per-
mission to hold an out of town ban-
quet. He also spoke of the increasing
faculty supervision over all campus
activities and the subsequent loss of
individualism among students.
One hundred and twenty-six attend-
ed the dinner. L. C. Paddock acted as
toastmaster. Prof. H. C. Anderson, of
the mechanical engineering depart-
ment, the faculty guest, agreed that
faculty control was becoming too
strict. his only mention of the out of
town banquet idea was a complimen-
tary allusion to the banquet held in
Toledo last year. The other speakers
of the evening were Frank Gibbs, '13E,
and Walter Staebler, '13.
Economics Class Will Hear Missourian
Mr. Walter W. Stewart, instructor of
political economy at the University of
Missouri, will speak before the course
in political economy 2, on the "History
of the National Banking System" in
the large lecture room of the engineer-
ing building, this afternoon at 2:00
o'clock. This is the first of a series
of three lectures to be delivered by
Mr. Stewart on banking reform. The
lectures are open to the public.

PLAN ORGANIZATION OF ALUMNI.
Wilfred Shaw is Elected Secretary of
New College Association.
A movement is on foot among the
alumni bodies of the various colleges
and universities to have the secretaries
of the different associations meet at
least once a year for the purpose of dis-
cussing the many problems which they
have to meet.
H. S. Warwick, secretary of the Ohio
State associations, originated the
scheme and issued the call for the
first meeting at Columbus, Ohio. Less
than half of the universities which ap-
peared to be keenly interested in the
matter sent representatives. Never-
theless, a temporary organization was
formed and officers were elected. Wil-
fred B. Shaw, secretary of Michigan's
alumni association was made secre-
tary. The next meeting has not yet
been arranged.
NOTED, SOCIALIST
TO LECTURE TODAY
Mrs. Carrie WV. Allen, of Syracuse, to
Speak in Newberry Hall at 8:00
O'clock Tonight.
HAS HELPED CLEAN NEW YORK.
Mrs. Carrie W. Allen, former actress,
settlement worker and newspaper wo-
man, will deliver a lecture on "What is
Socialism" in Newberry Hall tonight
at 8:00 o'clock. This is the second of
a series of lectures constituting an
educational course in socialism
brought here by the Intercollegiate
Socialist society.

SEAT SALE FOR
ANNUAL OPERA
BEGINS TODAY
Members Can Obtain Tickets For
"Contrarie Mary" All Day at
Whitney Theater Box
Office.
MEMBERSHIP SLIPS MUST BE
GIVEN IN EXCHANGE.
Each Purchaser to be Entitled to Six
Admissions; to Continue Sale
Tomorrow.
Tickets for "Contrarie Mary" will go
on sale to members of the Michigan
Union who have secured advance slips,
this morning at 10:00 o'clock, at the
Whitney theater. The box office will
remain open until 5:00 o'clock in the
afternoon, and the advance member-
ship sale will be continued tomorrow
during the same hours.
No admission cards will be sold at
the initial distribution except to those
presenting slips. Each membership
slip will entitle the holder to purchase
six tickets, for one or more perform-
ances. One man may present any num-
ber of slips and secure six tickets
with each for different nights, but no
one person will be permitted to buy
more than six tickets for any single
performance.
Last year the lines extended for
over a block, just before the ticket
window at the Whitney opened. In-
asmuch as nearly three times as many
advance slips have been given out this
year, it is expected the 1913 sale
will be correspondingly heavier.
The cast, chorus, orchestra and com-
mittees connected with "Contrarie
Mary" were given an opportunity t
mittees connected with "Contrar
A large block of pasteboards was di
posed of, most of the men calling
seats at the Friday evening. perfo
ance.
If the ticket sale reaches sufficient
proportions, the management announc-
es that a Friday afternoon perform-
ance will be given. The Saturday ev-
ening presentation has been already
announced, this performance, having
always been given as an extra onejn
previous years.
Tickets for the 1913 opera will go
on sale to the general public Monday
morning at 10:00 o'clock.

__ ..

ary

New Whitney Theatre Box Office

im

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