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March 20, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-20

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LOCAL

$$1.50
MAIL $2.40

The

Michigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50

MAIL $2.00

fi me ff yl I
- __-" - -- _ _ __ _ _. r,. r an ,., *'.TLIIJJU I VE1 R

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1913.

RIOR lFAl

XXIII, No. 119.

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LIMIT IS

IMPOSED UPON
MEET ENTRIES
Both Cornell and Michigan May Place,
Any Number of Men in Com-
petition for Saturday's.
Contest.
THIRD PLACES WILL COUNT
FOR POINTS IN CONFLICT.

THE WEATHER MAN
1
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Rain late
tonight and warmer.
University Observatory-Wednesday,
7:00 p. i., temperature 50.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
67.0; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 39.0; average wind velocity
15.0 miles per hour.
Prof. Scott to Speak at Notre Dame.
Prof. F. N. Scott of the rhetoric de-
partment leaves this morning for No-
tre Dame University where he will ad-
tdress the school of journalism. His
lecture will deal with newspaper
work.

ENTIRE OPERA
IS REHEARSED
AT ENSEMBLE
After Nearly Four Months or Piece.
meal Preparation, "Contrarie
Mary" is Practiced
in Full.
ADVANCE TICKET SALE TO
OPEN TOMORROW AT WHITNEY

Varsity Will Probably Derive
Benefit From Change
in Rules.

Great

Total of Slips Distributed to
Members Has Reached
Over 1,000.

Union

No limit is imposed on the number
of men that the rival universities can
enter in the Cornell-Michigan dual
scrap, and third places will count for
points. These changes from the re-
strictions of the Syracuse meet should
prove a big advantage to the Wolver-.
ines as there are many men in school
who have the speed to run third in
different events, but cannot better this
position.
Michigan plans to steal all three
places in the thirty-five yard dash
with Seward, Lapsley, Craig, and per-
haps Bond. The extenuated sprinter
is always slow in striking his gait, but
is now coming along rapidly and may
place in the berth behind Seward and
Lapsley. The leg injury that kept
Lapsley from the Syracuse trip is
bothering him less this week and he
expects to be in perfect form for Satt
urday. Opposition to this program will
be met in the person of Reller who is
backed by the Ithacans to crowd Sew-
ard for first.
In the high hurdles, which is the
lone barrier race, Whinery of Cornell
should run second to Craig, leaving the
third ribbon to be fought for by Mc-
Nabb and Greene, both of Michigan.
Jansen who placed in the highs in the
Syracuse battle may be used in this
(Continued on page 6.)
TO CAMPAIGN FOR
RESIDENCE HALL

TO PICK '.LEAGUE
ORATOR TONIGHT
Five Men Are Entered in Annual Con"
test; Were Picked From
22 Entries.
WINNERS RECEIVE TESTIMONIALS
Michigan's representative in the
Northern Oratorical League will be
picked at the university oratorical con-

After nearly four months of piece-
meal preparation, the first complete
rehearsal for "Contrarie Mary," the
1913 Michigan Union opera, was held
last night at the Union. Director St.
John put his proteges to work on the
opening chorus at the beginning of the
practice, and within two hours the en-
tire show, with the exception of a few
features, had been rehearsed.
Prospects for a "best ever" perform-
ance look better at every rehearsal, ac-
cording to those who have seen the men
in action. Practically all of the lines

test in University Hall tonight at 8:00 have been learned by the leading char-I

Association of Michigan

Women toI

Start Raising $60,000 1
Fund.
SITE IS NOT YET CHOSEN.
The Association of Michigan Women
will initiate a campaign to raise a
$50,000 fund with which to erect a
residence hall for women students of
the university. This action was tak-
en at a meeting of the residence hall
committee at the College club in De-
troit Saturday afternoon. The pro-
posed hall will accommodate 50 wom-
en.
It is hoped that women in Detroit
will be able to give considerable im-
petus to the movement if present plans
for interesting business men in that
city materialize. The association with
its various branches in the state, will
inaugurate a monster campaign for
funds immediately.
The committee has been investigat-
ing conditions at the eastern schools,
including Wellesley and Simmons.
From these reports it has been decid-
ed that the small halls are the best,
considering present conditions at
Michigan.
It is the intention of the committee
to have the hall assist in aiding a few
women through the university by sup-
plying clerical work which will be ne-
cessitated by the new building.- No
site for the proposed building has been
selected.
That there is a decided call for the
dormitory system at Michigan is
shown by the recent establishmenttof
League houses for women. Since the
women at Michigan constitute only
one-seventh of the total enrollment,
the question of living facilities, espe-
cially for freshmen, is a big problem,
which it is said the proposed hall, with
those which are to follow, will solve.
_. . 1 - -- -- _.3 L - i., J_ ._,,a...-

o'clock, the date having been advanc-
ed from Friday to avoid a conflict with
the State Peace contest at Ypsilanti.
Five men who were picked from ther
22 entries in the various class con-
tests will speak tonight. The winner
will receive the Chicago Alumni Med-i
al and Kauffman testimonial of $100.00
while second place will be awarded ai
Kauffman testimonial of $50.00.
The speakers, their subjects, and
the order in which they will appear,1
are as follows: J. L. Primrose, '13, "In-
dustrial Peace;" H. E. Goodenow, '13,
"Unrealized Self;" S. J. Rosenstein,
'15L, "America and the Jew;" Percival
V. Blanshard, '14, "Christianity and the
Social Crisis;" and W. C. Mullendore,
'14, "The Degredation of Our National1
Honor."
Judge Arthur J. Tuttle, '92-'95L, of
the Federal bench at Detroit, has con-
sented to act as the presiding officer.
The judges are Asst. Dean W. H.
Butts, of the engineering department,;
H. M. Slauson, and Profes-
sors W. I3. Henderson, S. L. Bigelow,
J. L. Markley, and J. S. Reeves.
The general admission will be 25
cents, but oratorical association mem-
bership tickets will admit.
UNIVERSITY SECURES SLIDES
USED EWART G. CULPIN.
Efforts of Prof. Aubrey Tealdi Bring
Entire Collection to Ann
Arbor Permanently.
Through the effort of Prof. Aubrey
Tealdi, of the department of landscape
design, the entire collection of slides
used by E rart G. Culpin in his exten-
sive lecture tour in America has been
secured for the' university. Michigan
was given the preference over sever-
al other universities, all of whom were
anxious to have the set. They will be
used by classes in landscape designing
and probably also in architectural
courses.
The collection embraces not only
all the slides shown to Ann Arbor au-
diences, but £ulso many others which
trace in detail the development of
Town Planning from the dawn of his-
tory to the present day. The acquisi-
tion of this collection is of particular
interest as it is the most complete col-
lection of its kind that can be found
in America today.
The slides of special note are those
of London, Paris, Vienna and several
German cities, particularly those of
"The City of the Future." The last
group is one on which Mr. Culpin has
spent much personal effort and orig-
inal work, many plansand relief maps
having been necessary to bring them
to their final completion.
Senior Engineers Dine Tonight.
The senior engineers will dine at the

acters, the choruses are singing and
dancing in veteran style, and the or-
chestra has almost conquered the
difficult music.
With nearly a week remaining in
which to perfect the presentation,those
in charge hope to be able to put on a
performance absolutely free from hes-
itancies on the first night. Last night's
rehearsal went through with only oc-
casional prompting, despite the fact
that it was the first time that the chor-
us work and speaking lines had been
co-related throughout.
Wooden Legs Arrive.
The wooden legs and accompanying
harnesses for the "Old Jerry Bones"
number arrived yesterday, and the
timbers were sawed down to accom-
modate the members of the chorus
taking part in this feature. The blank-
et scene, at the finale of act one, in
which Sobley, a gloomy student played.
by Waldo Fellows, '14, is tossed in the
air on top of an immense canvas, was
rehearsed for the first time last even-
ing.
Tickets Go On Sale Tomorrow.
More than 100 advance, sale ticket
slips were given out to members of
the Union yesterday. This brings the
total distributed to date to slightly
over 1,000, which is nearly three times
as many advance coupons as were,
handed out during the entire period
last year. From this indication, it is
expected that the ticket sale for "Con-
trarie Mary" will outdo all precedents
in the history of the annual Union pro-
ductions.
The advance ticket sale for the 1913
show, for Union members only, will'
open tomorrow, at the Whitney thea-
ter. Members will have their last op-
portunity to obtain slips allowing them
to purchase seats in the advance sale,
at the Union today.
REVIVE TALK OF HOLDING
PREP MEET IN ANN ARBOR.
It is Believed Schoolmasters Will Wel-
come Both University and
M.A.C. Gatherings.
Talk of the University of Michigan
holding an invitation interscholastic
meet this spring has been revived by
the announcement that the Schoolmas-
ter's association has given its indorse-
ment to the plans of M. A. C. for re-
establishing the latter's annual classic.
This action on the part of the peda-
gogues has given rise to the belief
that they will remove the ban from
the university affair.
Director Bartelme is of the opinion
that the Schoolmaster's association
will extend its endorsement to the uni-
versity, but has not yet made decisive
plans for the holding of an invitation

ENGINEERS TO R
EXHIBIT WORK,
OF DEPARTMENT:
Work of Students and Apparatus,
Used in All Sub-Departments
is to be Shown May Fes-,
tival Week.
STATE LEGISLATURE' WILL
BE INVITED TO BE PRESENT.
Idea is to Advertise Work of Engineer-
ing College and Uni-
versity.
Plans for a mammoth exhibit to be
held May Festival week, that will place
before the public the work that the
engineering department is doing along
all technical lines have been begun b
the students in the mechanical lab
courses.
It is planned to have on exhibition
besides the work of the students, the
various machines andrapparatus that
the department has for the benefit of
its members. The several sub-depart-
ments have been appealed to and com-
mittees have been elected by the civil
mechanical, chemical, and architectur-
al students. It is expected the other
departments will elect theirtcommit-
tees in the near future.
The state legislature will be invited
to attend and the exhibit will be ad-
vertised state wide. It is hoped by
having the exhibit May festival week
to obtain a large attendance.
At present the matter is in the
hands of the various committees, but
within a few days a general chairman
will be appointed who will personally
direct the affair.
"We hope to be able to show people
what the department is doing" said
Saul Saulson, '13E, "and to create a
greater interest in the state in the
engineering college. If the plan is
a success, it is hoped that next year
the whole university will join in hold-
ing a monster exhibit from all depart
ments."
When asked what he thought of the
exhibit, Prof. J. A. Bursleyof the me-
chanical department said, "There is
a big field for something of this kind
and I think it will be an excellent
means of advertising the department
and the university."
TALKS ON "HIGHER EDUCATION
IN THE U. S. AND GERMANY."
Prof. Rudolph Tombo, Jr., of Columbia
to Lcture Tonight on
"Parsifal.
"Higher Education in the United
States and Germany" was the subject
of a talk by Prof. Rudolph Tombo, Jr.,
of Columbia University, under the aus-
pices of the Ann Arbor Stadtverband
in the high school hall last night.
Prof. Tombo showed the principal dif-
I ference between German and Ameri-
can universities and illustrated his
talk with pictures of buildings and ac-
tivities at the different universities in
both countries.
Prof. Tombo will deliver another
lecture tonight on "Parsifal. The
lecture will be illustrated with pic-
tures, taken at a performance of that
opera in the Metropolitan Opera House
in New York city. The tickets for last
night's lecture will admit to tonight's
talk as well, and additional tickets
may be purchased at the door. for 25
1 cents.
Prof. Tombo will be entertained at

dinner this evening by the Theta Delta
Chi fraternity of which he was for
several years national president.

Verdant Tracksters Will
Farrell Build
1914 Team.

Help
Up

"Steve"
MEET.

UNCOVERED IN

STARS

YEARLINGCS SHOW
VARSITY CALIBRE

If any doubts were entertained by
"Steve" Farrell, concerning the place
to look for material of the proper tim-
ber to fiill the gap that will be made
by the graduation of some of this
year's stars, all such doubts were ef-
fectually settled by the performance
of the freshmen athletes in the M. A.
C. dual meet, last Saturday.
Catlett, by clearing 10 feet, 9 in. in
the pole vault, marks himself as a
contender for the Varsity in the next
season. Cross, while not vaulting in
the 'best way Saturday, has made 11
feet in practice and is expected to
make the competition for the vaulting
honors still keener.
H. L. Smith and Monetta will brisk-
en the fight in the dash with Seward
and Lapsley. Monetta is not only fast
across the gym floor but has proved
himself a flier on the century dash.
Over the hurdles, Armstrong is the
fastest man in the freshman class, but
has nothing on the sophomore hurdlers.
Greene, Cohn, and. McNabb. He may
develop into a star of Varsity magni-
tude as his form over the barriers is
better than that shown by the sopho-
more trio.
C. B. Smith will be a Varsity candi-
date of the first water, as the only man
now in school that can keep ahead of
him in the quarter mile is Haff, who is
running for his last year. Trainer
Farrell has every confidence that the
Bay City lad will make a phenome-
nal showing in track before his term
of four years is up.
The 880 yard run will be strongly
reinforced by the eligibility of Uffer
for Varsity competition,so that Mich-
igan in next year's meets will be able
to make bids for two places in the
half, with Carver leading the younger
runner.
In the mile and two mile run, there
will be no veterans next season, but
replenishment in this event will be
accomplished in a fair way by the
freshmen. Fox, Lynch, and Richards
are better milers than a freshman
class has produced since the verdan-
cy of Haimbaugh.
No added strength to the Varsity is
the shot put and high jump iu antici-
pated, as the best mark with the
weight on Saturday, was considerably
under 40 feet, and none of the jumpers
could negotiate more than 5 feet, 4 in.
One more chance will be given the
freshmen to show their class, when
the trip is made in May to East Lan-
sing to afford the agriculturists an op-
portunity to regain on a familiar track
the laurels lost in strange surround-
ings, last Saturday.
Women May Secure Tickets Today..
Admission cards for the women's
'banquet will be on sale today in the
library from 8:00 o'clockuntil 4:00
o'clock. Both undergraduates and col-
legiate alumnae can procure tickets at
this time.

M. A. C. SENDS THANKS BY
'WIRELESS.
-0-
By means of a wireless com-
munication, M. A. C. expressed
its appreciation of the talk by
Prof. C. S. Denison of the engi-
neering department at the engi-
neers banquet given at Lansing
Tuesday evening. Mr. Denison
was sent as a substitute for
Dean M. E. Cooley who could
not be present on account of ill-
ness. The communication was
as follows: "We were sorry that
Dean Cooley was not here last
night, but the engineers banquet
was a great success, and we ap-
preciated the talk given by his
substitute."
* * * * *s*s*s*s

*
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CHIEF

TO STUDY

I

Michigan Organization to (
Investigations of Other
Student Clubs.

FACTO

HONOR SYSTEN
IDEA DECLARE

W. H. Hamilton, at Senior Lit Dinner
Says Underlying Principle is
Step Toward Student
Government.
PETITION SENATE COUNCIL
FOR OUT-OF-TOWN BANQUET1
About 65 Men5 Attended Function at
Union; W. C. Trible Acted
as Toastmaster.
"The principle of the honor systen
is much larger than the system it
self," said W. H. Hamilton of the eco
nomics faculty in addressing the sen
ior its at their dinner at the Michigar
Union last night. ''It is an importan
step toward student self government.'
"This question involves the whol(
pr'oblem of the social responsibilit:
of the student. Whatever gives th
student responsibility for his conduc
tends to give' him a vital respect fo
the social system as a, whole* and fit
him to take a fuller part in univer
sity affairs."
Mr. Hamilton commended the sen
iors highly for their stand on th
introduction of the honor system int
examinations, and said he thought i
a long step toward student control of
the campus. What a student gets ou
of his college course, he said, is mor
or less intangible and indefinite, bu
he is bound to feel the favorable of
fect of the introduction of an hono
system and anything else which tend
ed toward student self-government.
During the evening a motion wa
passed that the senate council be peti
tioned to allow the class banquet to b
held outside of Ann Arbor.
Edward Lazear and Arth-fr H. Kuh
of the senior engineers were presen
(Continued on page 6.)
NAME. COMMITTEE

RESULTS

TO BE TABUL

For the purpose of inquiring intc
the status of unions, and other similar
student organizations, at the principal
universities in the country, Presideni
Edward G. Kemp, of the Michigan Un-
ion, announced the appointment of a
special committed last night.
The men named will meet sometime
this week, at which time a number of
institutions will be apportioned to
each man, and letters of inquiry will
be despatched. As a result of the in-
vestigation, it is expected to determine
the membership, social activities
equipment and method of managemen
of all the principal student commons
in the United States.
The following students, assisted by
Prof. William A. Frayer and Louis
Ayers, '08, of the house committee, wil
serve on the special committee: Frank
Murphy, '14L, chairman, Emmett Tay
lor, '12, D. H. Mosier, '13L, and Werne'
Schroeder, '14.
Results obtained fromthe inquiry
will be tabulated, and the statistics
later used in directing the efforts o
the Union. It is expected that the in
flux of new ideas will suggest a num-
ber of novel lines of activity for th
local organization.
ANOTHER CHANCE AT CREDITS
OFFERED TO SENIOR JURISTS
Senior laws suffering a loss of credi
last semester under the new markin
system will be given another chanc
to pass the examinations immedaitel'
after the spring vacation. The list c

HILL AUDITORIUM MAY BE
FILLED AT FESTIVAL

TIME.I

Seats for the coming May Festival
are being disposed of so rapidly that
from present indications it is believed
that Hill auditorium, with twice the
capacity of University Hall will be
filled for the concerts.
Seats in block "B" went on sale
Monday for $5.50, or $2.50 to pre-fes-
tival ticket holders. On Saturday, the
price will be reduced to $5.00, or $2.00
to pre-festival ticket holders. During
, this sale mail orders will not have
precedence as was the case in the sale
of blocks "A" and "B~ 1

I I

nion this evening at 6:00 o'clock. L.
. Paddock, '13, will act as toastmas-
er and Prof. H. C. Anderson and

meet here.
In the event of the prep school ath-
letes being invited to Ann Arbor in the
spring, the scope of the invitations
will not be confined to state schools,
but will be sent to the schools of ad-
ioining states.

Prof. E. T. Loeffler to Speak Tuesday. subjects in which the examina
Prof. E. T., Loeffler, of the dental de- will be given will be posted befor
partment, will give a lecture and dem- cation, and all students who I
onstration on "Radiography" Tuesday to get the required marks will t
evening at 7:30 o'clock in the amphi- lowed another chance in these

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