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March 18, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-18

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$2.00

The

Michigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $.00

;III No. 117.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

0 COURSES
IL BE GIVEN.
EXT SEMESTER

£

I

THE

WEATHER

MAN

I1

UNFINANCED SPRING CONCERTS

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Rain and
snow today. Rising temperature.
University Observatory-Monday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 29.5; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
30.5; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding 11.9; wind velocity 10 miles
per hour.

Engineering Department Announces
Four New Classes to Deal With
Motor Car Construction
and Design.
FORIA EN FROM BIG CONCERN
TO ASSIST IN INSTRUCTION.
Introductory Section, Including Work
in Laboratory, to be Open to
All Students.
Four courses in automobile con-
struction and design will be offered in.
the engineering department 'next fall
as the result of a decision of the me-
chanical engineering faculty yester-
day. One of these courses will be
open to all students in the university
who care to enroll, but the other three
will only be at the disposal of those.
who have completed certain specified
engineering subjects.
Prof. W. T. Fishleigh, who until last
fall was connected with the Packard
Motor Car company as foreman of the
experimental department, will teach
the course open to all students, and
will assist in the other more technical
courses. The several members of the
mechanical engineering faculty, who
will have charge of the design and lab-
oratory studies are, Professors H. C.
Anderson and J. A. Bursley, and
Messrs. Greiner and Palawski.
The first course will not be technical
in scope and will be open to all stu-
dents. The fundamental principles of
automobile construction and design
and their application to current auto
practice, with illustrated lectures, rec-
itations, and laboratory demonstra-
tions will be included in this course.
Two three hour courses in design
will be given, one covering the motor
unit, and the other the rest of the
chassis. These courses will be strict-
ly theoretical technical courses, and
will be open only to those who have
completed certain specified engineer-,
ing subjects.
The fourth course will deal with+
motor car testing, experiments, the1
study of modern motors and chassis,
with tests on the horse power develop-+
ed, efficiency, fuel consumption, tim-
ing, ignition, cooling and oiling sys-
tems, clutch units, carborators, etc.
The mechanical engineering faculty
have been considering the propositioni
of offering these courses for some+
time, but it was not until a meeting1
of that faculty yesterday that the mat-]
ter was definitely decided upon. 1

DeaIn Benjamin of Purdue to Give Talk
Dean C. H. Benjamin, of Purdue
university, will lecture on "The Fourth
Dimension" in room 348 in the engi-
neering building today at 4:00 p. m.,
under the auspices of the engineering
society. The meeting will be open to
the public.
CAMPUS TREES TO
BE GIVEN LABELS
More Than 300 Metal Signs Ordered by
Prof. Newcomb, Director of
Botanical Laboratory.
PLATES TO GIVE COMPLETE
NAMES OF ALL SPECIMENS.
Zinc plates giving both the common
and scientific names of all the larger
trees on the campus will be put in
place within a few days, according to
information received yesterday after-
noon from the botanical department.
The plates will be about 2 1-2 inches
by 4 inches in size, and the letters will
be printed by means of platinum chlo-
ride.
Contrary to general expectation,
they will be nailed to the trees instead
of being put in place by wire bands.
The nailing, it is claimed, proves less
injurious to the tree than any other
method.
Only the trees that have attained full
growth will be labeled. There are
about 300 large trees on the campus,
comprising over 40 species, and the
work of labeling will require several
days. The work will be divided among
the xnembers of the botanical depart-
ment, and it is expected that the aid
of the more advanced classes will be
asked.
This plan has been under consider-
ation for some time by the members
of the department because of the va-
riety of specimens to be found on the
campus, and the present consuma-
tion of the plans is due to the work of
Prof. F. C. Newcomb, director of the
botanical laboratory.

NEWS ITEM--"ROBINS ARE ALREA DY SECTI N>G CAMPUS BUILDING
SITES."

TRACK FOLLOWERS'
PRAISE FARRELL
Much Credit is' given to Trainer for
Victory at Syracuse Gym
Saturday Night.
MEN TRAIN FOR CORNELL MEET.
Too much credit cannot be given
Trainer Steve Farrell for Michigan's
victory over Syracuse, according to
those followers of Wolverine track
athletics who are in a position to know
the ins and outs of the padded track
game.
With practically the same material
that composed Michigan's team last
year at hand, Farrell has developed

UNIVERSITY FUND
MAY BE CREATED
Plan Proposed by Alumnus to Collect
Large Sums for Scholarships
and Other Purposes.
SYSTEM AT YALE IS SUCCESS.
Graduating classes and alumni
throughout the country will be asked
to aid in establishing a permanent
University Alumni fund, to be placed
at the service of the university with-
out restrictions, if the suggestion
which the Alumnus offered in its cur-
rent number meets with the approval
of the Alumni council-
Every year a large number of dona-

CONTRACTS INSTRUCTOR NAMED.
Prof. Scharfman Succeeds Prof.
Knowlton in Law Course.
Prof. I. N. Scharfman, of the econom-
ics department, has been appointed by
Dean Bates to fill the faculty vacancy
in the law department which was re-
cently made vacant by Prof. Knowl-
ton's leave of absence. Mr. Scharfman
has had three years' experience in
teaching law and a year in the politi-
cal economy department in this Uni-
versity. He is a graduate of the Har-
vard Law school.
The three sections in contracts,
which existed during Prof. Knowlton's
teaching, have been combined into two.
Section one and half of section two
will meet at 11:00 o'clock in room K
while section three and the other half
of section two will meet at 3:00 o'clock
In the same room.
HONOR EXAMS ARE
WANTEDBY LA WS
Seniors of Department Start Petition
Asking for Introduction
of System.
SOCIETIES DISCUSS QUESTION
Campus-wide agitation concerning
the introduction of the honor system
in examinations has been begun by
Woolsack's Michigamua and the senior
lit class, and a petition looking toward
the general adoption of the .plan has
been tentatively drawn up and is now
being circulated among the senior
laws.
The senior lits, who some time ago
took a definite stand in favor of the
honor system, have organized a com-
mittee to ascertain the sentiment of
the campus on the question.
As urged by the committee, the pro-
posed honor system does not insist
that cribbers" be exposed, but it is
merely a statement at the end of a
written examination to the effect that
no aid has either been given nor re-
ceived by the student. If a student is
aware of any cheating he may inform
a regularly appointed honor commit-
tee, but this is optional.
At present the system is perhaps
best known for its results at Prince-
ton, Virginia, and Leland Stanford
Universities. Classes under Profes-
sors C. 0. Davis and E. Turner have
already adopted the system here, and
it was successfully used in the last
final examinations.
Prof. Van Tyne to Address Educators.
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne will ad-
dress the Educational club at its meet-
ing in Tappan hall, Monday evening,
March 24, on "The Influence of the
Clergy on the American Revolution."
Detailed arrangements for the an-
nual banquet to be held April 3, will
be completed at this meeting.

Because of

UNION OPERA
MEN WILL NOT
GO TO DETROIT

Delay in Construction of

Theater )Ianagement is Forced
to Cancel Out-of-
Town Date.
DISTRIBUTION OF SLIPS FOR
SEATS TO CONTINUE TODAY.
More Than 900 Cards Given Out Up to
Date, While Only 500 Were
Used Last Year.
Owing to the fact that the construc-
tion of the New Washington theater
in Detroit is unavoidably delayed it
will not be ready for the production
of "Contrarie Mary" on April 19, as
was planned. Inasmuch as there isno
other available playhouse in Detroit,
it has been necessary to give. up the
idea of staging the opera in that city.
This was announced to the cast at last
night's rehearsal, by General Chair-
man Philip K. Fletcher.
Every effort was made to secure an-
other theater for a presentation but no
satisfactory arrangements could be
made. However, it is thought that
some plan may yet offer itself which
will make possible an out-of-town
production of the show, and thus give
the members of the cast at least one
trip. Toledo has been suggested as
one of the possibilities.
Union members who have not yet
procured slips which will entitle them
to purchase tickets for the opera are
urged to do so this afternoon from
2:00 o'clock until, 5:00 o'clock. More
than 900 have already been given out
while last year the total number dis-
tributed was 500. The seat sale for
members of the' Union will start Fri-
day at 10:00 o'clock and last until
5:00 o'clock Saturday, at the Whitney
theater.
In order to prevent a monopolization
of seats the plan of using the slips
has been changed this year. Each cou-
pon entitles the holder to purchase
six tickets for any one performance.
One man can hold five slips each rep-
resenting a member of the Union but
no one can buy more than six seats
for each presentation.
Letters have already been received
by Manager Homer Heath from a num-
ber of alumni and outsiders asking for
reservations of seats. These have
come mainly from Grand Rapids, Kal-
amazoo, Saginaw, Battle Creek, and
other cities throughout the state. One
was received from Berwyn, Ill., which
is said to be the longest distance from
which an order has ever been received.
Owing to the fact that the opera will
(Continued on page 4.)

an indoor team that not only defeated tions are made to the university and
Syracuse decisively for the first time there is no method available by which
since Michigan teams have been com- these scattered gifts can be consoli-

RISHMEN EAT STPATRICKS
DAY MEAL SET FOR GERMANS'
them, Irish to the right of them, etc.,
IIAMRIOCK SATELLITES, SHOCK ad lib.
SOLID SAUERKRAUTE1IS BY The battle waged wild and furious
DEVOURING DUTCH DISHES. for many minutes, for the Dutch were
hungry; but the Irish blood was up

"Verdainter Irisher Kerl-"
"Mu-r-r-r-der the D-a-r-r-n Dutch!"
Shillalies, sauerkraut and wieners
fill the air in the vicinity of Fort Bes-
semer last night when the Celts broke
up the customary Orangemen's Dutch
lunch desecration of St. Patrick's
day. The struggle was waged bitterly,
but at dawn the ramparts were still
"a wearin' o' th' green.'"
The tables had been spread ostenta-
tiously with pickled pigsfeet, sauer-
kraut, limberger and other Dutch del-
icacies which awaited the appetites of
20 anticipating Orangemen last night
when a host of Celtic clansmen be-
decked with shamrocks and brickbats,
invaded the dining room.
Without waiting for any invitation,
the Murphyites proceeded to occupy
the chairs originally intended to hold
the corpulent forms of the Germans
and to devour the strange vituals and
viands.
No sooner had they begun than the
shouts of "Hoch der Kaiser" reached
their ears. There was a rush for the
door, which was soon barricaded and!
supported against the futile blows of
the frantic Dutch. A dozen Irish slip-

and a dozen stalwart subjects of the
Kaiser were soon bound hand and foot
by the ropes which they themselves
had brought for the Celts.
While the Germans longingly saw
their ntational dishes devoured by the
enemy, the "Irishers" struggled as best
they could with the strange prepara-
tions. There was little difficulty with
the wieners; but the sauerkraut prov-
ed a stumbling block, and the limber-
ger capped the climax.
When the Irish had eaten their fill
and had expressed their feelings lo-
quaciously, pausing only for a "com-
plimentary" word or two from their
"guests,':rthe bound captives were led
campusward and finally released in
the wee, sma' hours.
The men from Killarney were out in
force all Monday afternoon, rallying
all the loyal knights of the pick and
parading State street in their gaudily
decorated war chariot. Goaded by the
thoughts of the Dutch celebrating the
seventeenth of March, the colors of
the patron Saint were unfurled, and
the wild challenge issued to all the
world who dared dispute the "werin'
o' the' green" on the sacred day when
the snakes were banished from the

peting in Archbold gym, but one that
is expected to wrest victory from the
Ithacans who close Michigan's indoor
season in Waterman gymnasium on
Saturday evening. While the efforts
of the members of the team are prob-
ably the largest factor in Michigan's
strong showing, the ability of Train-
er Farrell in keeping the men at work,
and rounding the individuals into form,
has been a great factor in the Wol-
verine success.
Tranier Farrell is also given great
credit for his good judgment in taking
Jansen to Syracuse as the fourth man
on the relay team. Jansen not only
performed his part in the relay cred-
itably, but added points for Michigan
by annexing second in the high hur-
dles.
This week commences the final
grind in preparation for the indoor
meet against Cornell., The Ithacans
are strong this year, and though the
chances look bright for a Michigan
victory, Trainer Farrell is not going to
let the men rest on their oars, nor will
he let the men overwork themselves.
When Wolverines meet Ithacans on
Saturday evening next, it is likely that
Michigan will have her full strength
out in Waterman gym.
WE SHOULD WORRY, DROP OUR
SHEARS AND CUT UP A BIT.
The members of both staffs of The
Michigan Daily will desert the haunts
of the paste-pot and shears and invade
the Elysian fields at the Union for their
annual party, next Monday evening,
March 24.
The Cubs club will present a charac-
teristic campus skit and a seven-piece
orchestra will furnish the music for
dancing.
Prohibs Name Candidate for Regents.
C. W. Obee, of Adrian, and L. H.
White, of Kalamazoo, were the candi-
dates for university regents nominated
at the recent Prohibition convention.

dated. A general fund, the Alumnus
says, could be used to establish more
scholarships, to make up the differ-
ence in a professors salary which
makes him decide to leave Michigan,
and go elsewhere, to aid in meeting
the growing requirements of the libra-
ry, or could be used to benefit the uni-
versity in numerous other ways.
A fund similar to the one suggested
was established at Yale a number of
years ago and to date has yielded the
university $1,066,984.68. One-fifth- of
the living graduates have contributed
to it and the various graduating class-
es have vied with one another in at-
tempting to contribute the largest
amount of money. It is customaFy to
use only the interest on the total. The
income for the current year was
$55,280.66.
DEAN EFFINGER ATTENDS
MEETINGS AT IOWA CITY
Dean John R. Effinger left yesterday
for Iowa City, Ia., where he will attend
the convention of the Association of
Deans of State Universities. The meet-
ings will be held today and tomorrow
at the University of Iowa. Dr. Effinger
will also attend the meetings of the
North Central Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools, which will be
held in Chicago the last of the week.
Professors A. S. Whitney and F. N.
Scott will probably be present at the
Chicago meetings.

LOCAL PHILOSOPHER - COBBLER
CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY BY
COLLECTING OLD SHOES.
Tom Lovell is 50 years old today.
Undaunted and optimistic, the bard-
philosopher-preacher-cobbler who has
become as intimately linked with Ann
Arbor institutions as the hamburger
joint and the Orient, today passes the
half century mark of a rugged, adven-
turesome road.
Tom's troubles began at his birth, he
'says. This occurred in; a picturesque
hamlet in Northamptonshire, England.
Like most great men, Tom came of
humble parentage. He never attended
school. In his tenth year, says' the
preacher, he had a vision in which his

TOM LOVELL REACHES FIFTIETH
MILESTONE OF RUGGED ROAD
19_ d. ,s f t E-p toi,,Ais., L'Tni-

66j-mlilejourney to ouoiouaoo-cr . m
grating to Canada, Tom began his
tramp westward until he found him-
self in Windsor. Here he proposed to
settle down. The cobbler whose jove
for poetry and philosophy was rapid-
ly. overwhelming him, visited Ann -Ar-
bor one autumn day of that year and
hied himself campusward. He went
back to Windsor the next day, gather-
ed up .his tools and came back to Ann
Arbor.
Since then Michigan has been dis-
cussing philosophy with Tom while
bargaining with him over the price of
its old shoes.
Tom likes philosophy, and he likes
to preach. He hit upon the scheme of
utilizing a down-town picture show
in which to deliver Sunday sermons
last year. The scheme did not prove
a success without the pictures. While
he has not published any of his treat-
ises, he is at present preparing a se-
ries of essays on "Success" which may
appear shortly.
"Never say die" is Tom's philosoph-
ical creed.
"W'en ye're daown in th' mou'," he
says, "always t'ink of a pair of aold
boots. -No matter haow bad they're
twisted, they'll always bring ye a'f a
shillin'. An' if ye've got th' boots, call

W. J. Galbraith, '94L, Visits Universitf mission of instilling hope into the

William J. Galbraith, '94L, of Calu-
met, was in the city yesterday *s a
guest of Regent J. E. Beal. Mr. Gal-
braith was formerly a member of the
state legislature and an officer of the
university committee.
Honor System Defeated at Syracuse.
Students of Syracuse University, vot-
ing on the honor system at the annu-
al spring elections, defeated the pro-
posed measure..

.souls of the discouraged was pointed
out to him.
Subsequently, Tom became a shep-
herd boy. The rugged life gave him
a strong, healthy body and he soon be-
came the village "scrapper." His ref-
ormation followed and he joined the
Salvation army to become a preacher.
At the age of 23 Tom married and
settled down to the cobbler's bench.
Economic necessity drove him to oth-
er climes in 1907 .and he made the

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