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March 13, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-13

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LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

The

an
.9,

Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

___.I IV

Vol. XXIII, No. 113.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

- -- - - - -i

BULLETIN GIVES
WIDE SCOPE OF
MICHIGAN WORK

University Benefits Thousands
Lectures and Hospitals;
Naiture of Work
Explained.

With

COLLEGE DIRECTLY SERVED
80,000 PERSONS LAST YEAR.
Official Pamphlet to Legislature and
Citizens of State is
Issued
Through the extension lectures, hos-
pitals, clinics, and laboratories more
thian 80,000 people of the state are di-
rectly served by the University of
Michigan every year. The extent of
these different branches of work has
been made public in a bulletin of in-
formation just published and address-
ed to the legislature and the people
of the state.
During the year ending June 30,1911,
thereweret2,791 patients received and
treated at the two hospitals. Many of
these persons would be public burdens
had it not been for the free treatment
which they were enabled to secure
here in the hospitals. The only ex-
penses are nominal charges for bard
Andhmediine and for extra nursing
when necessary; as operations, pro-
fessional treatment, and care in the
wards is free to all patients.
The pasteur institute has treated
1,058 persons for the prevention of hy-
drophobia since its establishment in
1908, and there has not been a single
((ath from any of the case treated
here,
The dental department, in clinics
and demonstrations, annually treats
more than 4,500 patients without any
expense other than for materials.
The various laboratories of the uni-
versity serve the public in a variety of
ways. By the sanitary analysis of
drinking water, epidemics have been
prevented in many Micligan cities,
and the det. rate of the state is thus
materially lowered. Analysis of foods
and drugs is also made without charge
under certain conditions, and this ser-
vice is widely used. In the chemical
laboratory, tests of clay soils are made
for the State Geological survey.
The museum cooperates with the
schools of the state, having given tn
collections aggregating 1,000different
sppcimens to different institutions in
the past four years
The engineering department main-
tins a highway laboratory for the
testing of rod mterials, the service
beipg performed for necessary expen-
ses, This laboratory is identical to
the one mlaintained by the government
at Washington. A sanitary laboratory
for the benefit of the public is also be-
ing planned by this department.
PROF.KN TOLKFN
WILL GO SOUTH
Prof. Jerome C. Knowlton, of the
law depatment, Annonced to is
glasses yesterday that he would leave
tOday for his first vacation in 25 years
e ywill be accompanie by Mrs
Jnoiltn, whose ill-health has m4
the trip imperatiyt . eew Orleans an
the southern reserts will be the ob
jective points on the trip.
Prof. Knowlton yesterday dispelle
the doubt that his own Ill-health woul
interfere with further meeting of class
es, and expressed an intention to re
turn immediately after spring vaca
tion. So far as is known no one ha
Peen selected to conduct Prof. Knowl
ton's classes in contracts, but the clas
wll meet as usual Tuesday.

IWEWATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Thursday
rain,
University Observatory-Wednesday,
7:00 p. i., temperatue 42.3; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
53.7; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 27.0; wind velocity 6 miles
per hour.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS TO DANCE
AT UNION TOMORROW EVENINGf
Junior engineers will hold the sec-
ond of a series of dances at the Mich-Q
igan Union tomorrow evening. Mr.
and Mrs. Frank R. Finch will act as
chaperones. A majority of the 100
tickets have been disposed of but the
remaining cards may be procured
from members of the social committee.
for $1.00. St. Patrick's day specialties
have been planned.
UNION MEMBERS
TO DINETONIGHT
Dean "I. E. Cooley Will Discuss U. S.*
Navy's Offer to
Students.l
PROF. C. B. VIBBERT WILL TALK.
Michigan Union members will dine
tonight at the regular monthly mem-,
bership dinner. The tickets have been+
having a good sale and those remain-
ing may be obtained today at the desk
in the Union or from any member of
the committee.
Sec. Shirley Smith will act as toast-
master. Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of
the engineering department, will dis-
cuss the recent offer of the navy de-
partment to college students for sum-
mer service on battleships. Prof. C. B.
Vibbert, of the philosophy department,
has chosen for his subject "Two Types
of College Students." E. B. Chaffee,
'13L, will talk on "Latent Ability," and
Frank Gibbs, '13E, will discuss topics
of present interest to the campus.
George P. Becker, of the School of Mu-
sic will sing,
The dinner will start promptly at
6:00 o'clock,
PANHELLENIC IS UNABLE TO
DECIDE PLEDGING QUESTION
One Faction Wants Gradual Changes;
Others Desire Immediate
Settlement,
Panhellenic, the inter-sorority coun-
cil, met again Tuesday to discuss the
question of pledging freshmen. While
no definite conclusion was reached,
owing to outstanding committee re-
ports, there seems to be two distinct
veiws of the matter among the women.
One view prefers a gradual adoption
of pledge limitations, leading up to a
time when no woman shall be pledged
until her sophomore year. The other
view is that it would be better, and
probably fairer, to legislate definitely
on the matter. The fact that the uni-
versity administration has been con-
siderate enough to leave the proposi-
tion entirely in the hands of the Pan-
hellenic, is one of the reasons urged to
, take action as soon as practicable.
Michigan1, it seems, is unique in its
e sorority question in that the dormi-
tory system in vogue at most other
- colleges is but prospective here, With
the advent of dormitories, it is claimed,
d comes tr solution of the pledge ques-
4 tion,
-J

- Chaperones Selected for Law Dance.!
- Prof. and Mrs. J. H. Drake
s and Prof. and Mrs. E. N.
- Durfee will chaperone the "Home
s Rule" dance to be given by the 1915
laws March 17 at the Michigan Union.

ARTISTS START
WORK ON OPERA
PARAPHERNALIA
All New Costumes Will be Used in 1913
Production; Special Scenic
E1fects for Show Are
Being Painted.
MRS. ROBERT HOUSTON AGAIN
TO HAVE CHARGE OF GOWNS.
Glee Club )Iembers Holding Parts in
Opening and (losing Choruses
to Rehearse Tonight.
Active work for the costuming of
"Contrarie Mary" was commenced last
night. Mrs. Robert Houston, profes-
sional costumer, who has garbed the
manly forms in every Michigan Union
play for five years, was present at the
regular rehearsal held at the Union,
and the measures of some of the chor-
usmen were taken.
All new costumes will be used in
the 1913 production. Not a remnant
of the old gowns and incidental par-
aphernalia has been saved, and shoes,
hose, skirts ad infinitum will be made
especially for this year's show.
The scenery for "Contrarie Mary" is
now being painted on the frames of
the Detroit Opera house, and will be
completed several days before the date
of the first performance. Two sets
will be used, one representing the ex-
terior of an old English inn and the
other the depleted hallway of a ruined
feudal castle.
A call was issued yesterday for the
Glee club men who are to take part in
the opening and closing choruses to be
present at last night's rehearsal, but
only a few attended. A second prac-
tice of men filling these roles will be
held at the Union at 7:00 o'clock this
evening.
PROF. ZOWSK'S TURBiNE
BREAKS ALL PAST RECORDS
Expects to Improve Engine as Result
of Tests Made at Holyoke
Testing Station.
Prof. S. J. Zowski, of the mechanical
engineering department, received
word yesterday from the public test-
ing station at Holyoke, Mass., that the
new high speed, high power water tur-
bile which he designed last summer,
had again broken all records for effi-
ciency.
The former high efficiency record of
turbines of this type was held by the
wheel which Prof. Zowski designed a
year ago. This machine developed an
efficiency of 89.37 per cent, an excess
over the power which had been de-
veloped up to that time of over 40 per
cent. With the new wheel the power
was further increased and the best ef-
ficiency reached the value of 90.1 per
cent.-
"The results show," said Prof. Zow-
ski, "That I am not yet through with
my work of driving the power of a
turbine to a commercial limit." He is
already considering plans for improv-
ing the present design.
HONOR SOCIETIES PREPARE I
ELABORATE DANCE PROGRAM
Elaborate decorations in yellow and
blue will conceal the walls of the Un-
ion when the Barristers, Vulcans and
Druids assemble there on March 21,
for the much talked of "B. V. D."
dance. Each organization will feature
one of the dances and present its own

favors. Harold Abbott, '13, has. de-
signed an eight-page program for the
affair and the Wright Saxophone trio
will come from Columbus to furnish
the music.

VARSITY TEAMS
ANNOUNCED FOR'
SYRACUSE MEET
Squad Leaves at 9:30 O'Clock Tonight
in Special Car; Will Become
Familiar With Track
Friday Afternoon
TRYOUTS FOR FRESH-3f. A. C.
STRUGGLE ARE HELD AT GYM
Although Eight First Year Candidates
Are Ineligible, Situation is
Not Hopeless.
Few surprises were sprung yester-
day afternoon when Trainer Farrell
posted the names of the track athletes
to represent Michigan in the Syracuse
indoor meet Saturday, at Syracuse.
Only one man is to be carried for the
dash and one for the hurdles, but in-
stead of a single contestant in the half
mile and pole vault, two men in each
of these events will make the trip.
The team leaves at 9:30 o'clock this
evening, occupying a special sleeper,
and will arrive in Syracuse at 11:00
o'clock tomorrow morning.
Some of the chosen 14 made their
places as the result of their showing
in the trials which Trainer Farrell
held yesterday. It was due to this op-
portunity that Jansen qualified in the
relays.
The following names were posted
on the bulletin board with the vets
assigned to lower berths and the re-
cruits in the lofts: Capt. Haff, Craig,
Kohler, Sargent ,Haimbaugh, H. Smith,
Baier, C. M. Smith, Carver, Seward,
Cook, Daskam, W. H. White, and Jan-
sen.
Trainer Farrell is certain that Laps-
ley, the colored sprinter, would have
had a place if he were not disabled
with a strained tendon. His leg was
weak before the Varsity meet, but
seemed well enough to admit his run-
ning, and he felt no ill effects from it
until Tuesday. Daskam's consistent
performances in the pole vault entitled
tim to make the journey, as he clears
11 feet with regularity. Jansen, be-
sides showing well for the relays,
made fast time in the half mile.
A light work out will be given the
men this afternoon, and they will have
one more chance to stretch their limbs
before the meet, when they practice on
the Syracuse track, Friday afternoon.
In the short time they will have, the
men will try to make themselves as
familiar with the turns 'of the strange
,track as possible. In this difference
of track, Syracuse will have a strong
advantage over the Wolverines.
During the absence of the Varsity
athletes, the freshmen will be cocks
of the walk in Waterman gym, and all
the rubbing privileges will be extended
to them in preparation for their meet
with the Varsity of M. A. C. Saturday.
It is a prevalent idea on the campus
that the fresh squad has been crippled
by the ineligibility of eight of their
candidates, that the coming meet
would be a farce, This is not exactly
the case, for though the team will not
be so strong as expected, with 25
youngsters of promising ability to picl
from, the situation is by no means a
gloomy one.
The majority of tryouts were held
yesterday, and the following men
will probably appear in the list of en-
tries:.Capt. H. L. Smith, Monetta, Lyt-
tIe, Shulkin, Darnall, Gore, Uffer, Fox
Davis, Hamill, Lynch, Richards, Shaf-
fer, Page, Maguire,, Cross, Catlett,Chat-

field, Bruch, Gault, Benton, Armstrong
Pan, Crumpackor,. and Nye, Furthe'
trials are scheduled for this afternoon
when the personnel of the fresh Lean
will be definitely tnown. + -t

JUDGE KUHN WILL SPEAK HERE.
Graduate of '94, Will Feature Program
at Annual J-Law Banquet.
Judge Franz C. Kuhn, '94L, of Mt.
Clemens, a member of the State Su-
preme -bench, has accepted an invita-
tion from the junior laws to speak at
their annual banquet at the Allenel ho-
tel Friday evening at 7:15 o'clock.
Prof. T. A. Bogle, Harry Lippincott
and Frank Stephan will also speak.
Frank Murphy will act as toastmaster
and will be introduced by R. M. Sny-
der, class president. Two or three
musical numbers will also be on the
program which includes a selection
by the class quartet.
Faculty Man Talks to Cercle Francais.
M. Rene Talamon of the French de-
partment spoke to the Cercle Francais
yesterday at Tappan hall. The subject
of his address was "Le Mason de
Francais."
ALL-STAR HOCKEY
TEAMSSELECTED
Michigan*Daily Chooses Two Lineups
of Pucksters From Squads
in Local League.

OPERA TICKETS
WILL BE SOLD
BY NEW PLAN
Cards Permitting Union Members to
Purchase Six Seats For Any
Performance to be Given
Out Saturday.
SALE TO GENERAL PUBLIC TO
OPEN MONDAY, MARCH 24
Management Will Not Attempt to Fil
Mail Orders Until Selling
is Commenced

I
i
1
1
l
3
1
j

MEN GET' SIX PLACES.

LIT

First Team Second Team
Spring(lit........ L.W. . .Hunting(lit)
Cohen (lit) ........ R.W. ..Raatz (E)
Wharton (L).......R. ..Morrison (L)
Doyle (lit).........C.....King (Sc.);
Buerile(Sc.)...... P.....Healy (L)
Warrel(Sc.)...... P. .. McLeod (lit)
Carpenter (E)..... G. ..Barnum (lit)
The above named hockey teams are'
the choice of The Michigan Daily sport'
staff for a first and second all-star
lineup, picked from the four depart-
mental sevens. The men given posi-
tions upon the first aggregation in
some cases may not be the -best indi-
vidual players, but from all the men
performing in the four league teams,
these seven are believed to be the best
seven to work together as a team.
The literary team was especially
strong this season in the wing posi-
tions and anyone who followed the
games carefully realized that in Cohen
they had by far the best man in his
position that skated on the rink. Hunt-
ing and Spring of the same squad, and
Raatz on the boilermakers' list were
in about the same class. Spring was
given the decision over the other two
on account of his superior ability to
use the stick on both sides.
For the center position, Doyle and
King were picked on the consistency
of their work during the entire
schedule. Doyle was placed on the
first choice seven on account of his
speed and dodging ability. Wharton
and Morrison were' easily the logical
man, for the rover jobs, the former
having a shade the advantage of the
latter in making his strokes find the
net.
Warrel and Beuerile won their re-
spective positions at point and cover
point with, no opposition. The two
science men were by far the best pair
of puck chasers that have performed
upon the local rinks. Healy and Mc-
Leod both played strong games
throughout the season and are deserv-
ing of being placed second only to the
two science men.
The goal job gave the hardest prop-
osition to solve. Carpenter and Bar-
num both played phenomenal games
' protecting the net, and it was nearly a
toss up to decide which should be giv-
en the decision. Carpenter finally
swung the vote owing to the fact that
he played the defensive position upon
a team that played on the defense
in most of the battles, so it was he
who played the greater part of their
contests.

Slips permitting members of t1
Michigan Union to buy from one to si
seats for any performance of "Cor
trarie Mary" will be given out at thi
Union Saturday from 9:00 a. m. to 6.
p. m. Only one of these coupons wi
be given to each Union member, an
membership cards must be show
when the slips are secured.
The advance sale for members c
rhe Union only will take place FrIT
and Saturday, March 21 and 22, fro
10:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. Slips may I
obtained any time before that dat
Any one member may hold as many)
five slips, each representing anodiE
member, but no one person may bu
more than six tickets for any one pe
formance.
Under the system in use in form(
years, one Urnion member could col.e
a large nuraber of ticket slips fro
acquaintances, and obtain six admi
sions for eaci slip presented. In th
way, one member who was fortuna
enough to get far up in the line cou
corner a good portion of the availab
seats.
Tickets for the opera will go on s t
to the general public Monday, Marc
24, three days preceding the first pr
sentation. In former seasons all
the tickets for the favorite Friday a.
Saturday evening shows have beE
sold out at the membership sale, ai
it is expected that the seats will go
fast this year, despite the new meth
of distribution.
Mail orders for seats will not
filled until after the general sale b
gins. Persons sending in orders f
seats for particular performances w
run somewhat uncertain chances
being accommodated. The manag
ment feels that it is unfair to alko
outsiders and individuals who wish
avoid standing in line, to secure pasi
boards before the regular sales.

CHANGES MADE
FORESTRY COU

I

Changes in the requisites for de-
grees and additional courses of study
for the coming year were announced
by the faculty of the forestry depart-
ment yesterday. The new catalog
which has just been published will be
sent out today.
The number of courses offered has
been changed from 14 to 26, and the
required number of hours credit a
semester have been increased from
20 to 30. These increases will neces-
sitate a reduction in the lit studies,
consequently the language courses re-
quired heretofore have been dropped.
The courses strengthened. and length-
ened are those in silviculture, the util-
(Continued on page 4.)
Prof. Levi Speaks at J-Lit Dinner.
Junior lits to the number of 75 din-
ed at the Union last evening. Prof.
M. Levi and Percival V. Blanshard ap-
pealed for a higher standard among
college men. Blanshard used Pres.
Woodrow Wilson as a model for col-
lege students.

Seat Sgle at Tjiniyc-
sity Hall -Box Office
or Wahi's Today at
4 P. M.

The

UNIVERSITY

HALL,

By Ooidoin
Friday Evening, March
At EIGHT O'CLOCK

14th

Prices
5oc

- 35C

O,,atorical

Associa-

tion Ticket Admi

..
,. ~ - '
t v:_

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