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March 11, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-11

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OCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

he

icigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50I

No. 111.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

y.--f

H SWINGS

.

THE WEATHER MAN

E IN

FIRST
YEAR

CUT

OF

Richey Reduces Original Squad of
Men to 30 Aspiring Diamond.
ists; All Pitchers Are
Retained.

80

ADD ANOTHER HOME CONTEST
TO VARSITY BALL SCHEDULE
University of Kentucky to flay Return
Game on Ferry Field
April 29.

The axe fell with a vengeance on the
baseball squad yesterday and as a re-
sult of the wholesale~slaughter about
30 hopefuls are now cavorting about
inside the net where over 80 were
once wont to congregate. All the
pitchers were kept on the roll call but
infielders and outfielders were behead-
ed without regard and Coach Rickey
now has the task of weeding out a
team from the remaining squad. The
cut was not absolutely final as all the
men who were dropped at this time
will be given another chance directly
after spring vacation when the team
gets outside.
Out of the 30 men wlo remain will
be picked the team to take the south-
ern trip and just now the rivalryis
so keen that it would be next to im-
possible to pick the aggregation who
will take the journey. There are six
catchers who aspire to do the back-
stopping and about ten infielders seek
to divide three places equally. Three
men are out for first and five hope
to assist Capt. Bell in the gardens.
It is probable that four pitchers w.l1
be taken on the first jaunt as the work
will be hard and since the men will
not be in mid season form, they will
need rest. Just'who the four will be
is hard to say and nothing definite can
be said except that Sisler and
Quaintance are coming in great shape.
One more home game has been ad-
ded to the schedule in the shape of a
return game with the University of
Kentucky. The southerners will ca-
vort on Ferry diamond on April 29 and
the contest-should be a good one.
TTO OPEN EXHIBITS
OF AMERICAN ART
Original Drawings of Illustrators
Will be Displayed in
Memorial Hall.
WILL CONTINUE FOR TWO WEEKS.
Original work of prominent Amer-
ican illustrators will be exhibited on
the second floor of Alumni Memorial
building for two weeks, commencing
tomorrow. Over 200 designs are in-
cluded among which are drawings by'
Charles Dana Gibson and other mag-
azine contributors of note.
The exhibit is given under the aus-]
pices of the Ann Arbor Art association
which has secured it from the Society
of National Illustrators. Among the de-1
signs will be illustrations of fiction as1
well as frontispieces and all kinds1
of popular illustrating.All of the draw-
ings are much larger than the maga-
zine reproductions.. The committee be-
lieves that the exhibit will be the most,
popular of any art display given by the
association.
Some of the artists represented are]
Cha'rles Dana Gibson, Joseph Pennell,
S. Benda, Vernon Howe Baifey, C. Al-
len Gilbert, and Louis Hitchcock.
Drawings of Orzon Lowell, contribu-
tor to. Life will constitute another ex-
hibit to be given by the association.

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Unsettled,
with probably rain, and moderate tem-
perature.
University Observatory- Monday,
7:00 p. m., temperature, 32.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
39.6; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 24.0; average wind velocity
5 miles per hour.
SENIOR LITS TO HAVE LAST
CHANCE TO PAY DUES TODAY
Senior lits will have the last chance
to pay their class dues and order their
-invitations this afternoon at the S. L.
A. window in University hall from 1:00
to 5:30 o'clock. Cards have been sent
to all delinquents and those who do
not respond this afternoon will be un-
able to obtain any invitaions, as the
orders must be sent in at once.
Another consignment of canes will
be sent for, so all who desire sticks
and have not ordered them may do so
this afternoon at the S. L. A. window.
"Pip" Titus, '10, Writes New Story.
"Squared" is the title of a story by
Harold Titus, '10, which appeared in
the Sunday magazine of the Detroit
Free Press on March 9. Titus was
elected managing-editor of The Mich-
igan Daily for 1911-1912, but he was
forced to leave school on account of
poor health. At present he is writing
short stories for various magazines.
DECIDE CAMPUS
CHAMPS TONIGHT

Twenty-Seven Men Selected
ioie Organizations to Take
o Paciic Coast
Next Month.

ANNOUNCE TREP
PERSONNEL OF
NUSICAL CLUBS,

PROF. H1BROOK APPOINTED
TO REPRESEN I THE FACULTY'
Selden Dickinson, Pianist, and Mal-
clni McCormIck, Manager,
Will ake the Trip.
Names of the members of the Glee
and Mandolin clubs, who will make
the trip to the Pacific coast next
month, were announced last evening
as follows.
Glee Club: First tenors, Kenneth N.
esterman, '14; Lyle M. Clift, '14; Peter,
A. Hartesveldt, '14; George M. Moritz,
'15; Claire L. Strath, '15.
Second Tenors, Rolfe Spinning, '13;
John P. Manna, '13; Spencer S. Scott,
'14; Raymond S. Taylor, '13L; Waldo'
E. Fellows, '14; alternate, Henry E.
Spring.
First Basses, Richard J. Simmons,
'11-'13L; Robert N. Ogden, Jr., '11-
'13L; Jeptha A. Wade, '13E; Freder-
ick T. E. Munson, '14M; George D. Sut-
ton, '15M; alternate, Cregor Quaint-
ance, '14L.
Second Basses, Edward G. Kemp, '12-'
'14L; W. Campbell Trible, '13; Bruce
D. Bromley, '14; J. Herbert Wilkins,
'14; Frank E. Kohler, '14; alternate,
Frank Daniels. '13E.
Mandolin Quartet: Irving E. Latti-
.iner, '12E; Stanley T. Mills, '13E; Al-
fred 0. Williams, '14E; John G. Bruce,;
'15.
Prof. Evans llolbrook, of the law de-
partment, has been appointed by Pres-
ident Harry B. Hutchins to accompany
the clubs on their trip. Selden S. Dick-
inson, '13, will go .along as accompa-
nist, and Manager Malcolm McCor-
mick will also take the trip.
The home personnel of the musical
clubs comprises 50 men, and it was
only after some discussion that the
committee in charge of khe selections,
including the respective leaders, the
president of the clubs, and the musi-
cal director, was able to come to a de-
cision as to the most suitable men to
make the long journey.
POSTERS rOR "CONTRARIE MARY"
ABE PUT ON SALE AT IWAHWS

From
Trip

VARSITY MEETS
ORANGEMEN AT
CLOSEOF WEEK
Track Team Will Journey to Syracuse
But Men Who Will Be Taken
Have Not Yet Been
Chosen.
FINAL SELECTION MAY BE
MADE TODAY OR TOMORROW
All-Fresh Team to Meet M. A. C. Var-
sity in Waterman Gym This
Week End.

Junior Engineers and Third
Laws to Battle for Bansket-
ball Supremacy.

Year

BOILERMAKERS HAVE ADVANTAVE
In the light of the article of play put
up by the junior engineers in their
preliminary contests, chances for this
five to triumph in the final match with
the junior laws tonight in Waterman
gym at 7:30 o'clock loom up very fa-
vorably. On the result of this contest,
the coveted campus championship
hinges, with the sweaters and caps
that the athletic association deals out
to the holders of this honor.
Interest in the basketball series
struck a high pitch from the very first
game, when the soph lits nosed out the
freshmen of that department by one
point, the totals standing 21 to 20. The
next three contests were not remark-
able for finished play and for a space
the interest waned until revived by the
championship quality manifested by
the junior engineers in the trouncing
they administered to the senior engi-
neers.
Lack of practice and roughness at
times characterized the first matches,
but when the poorer teams had been
weeded out in the competition and
the surviving quintets hooked up in
the semi-finals, the play was markedly
more polished and the teams showed
that some semblance of team work had
been drilled into the men.
Confidence will be a strong factor
on the side of the junior engineers in
the impending championship tilt, as
this squad has annexed the basketball
title in the two previous years. The
future barristers are on their mettle
and are practicing every afternoon.
Their great difficulty will be to toss
baskets over the heads of the junior
engineer's forwards as the latter have
demonstrated unusual proficiency in
covering. The players will be called
promptly to the floor at the scheduled
time and the managers must have their
men ready.
LOAN FUND IS ESTABLISHED
BY THE ALUMNI OF. TOLEDO.

Michigan's Varsity track team faces
a real track meet this week, when
the squad will journey to Syracuse to
compete with the orange team Friday
evening in the Syracuse gymnasium.
The preliminary meet for the novic-
es, and the Varsity meet for the veter-
ans and novices alike, have served
only for competitive training. The real
culmination of the indoor training
comes with the Syracuse meet of this
week and the Cornell contest of March
22, and with these two important dual
engagements in view, the candidates
for the team have renewed their en-
deavors for places on the squad.
The men who' will represent the
Maize and Bluq at Syracuse have not
been chosen as yet, but as the squad
will leave on Thursday, it is probable
that today and Wednesday will witness
the final selection of the athletes to
make the trip. The Varsity meet serv-
ed to show Trainer Farrell and Cap-
tain Haff what the candidates for the
team could do under competitive con-
ditions, and with the work that the
men do today and Wednesday, it is ex-
pected that ample basis for the selec-
tion of the team will be furnished.
Of the men who are likely to be tak-
en to Syracuse, Captain Haff for the
quarter, Kohler for the weights, Sar-
gent for the high jump, Haimbaugh
for the mile, Seward for the 35 yard
dash and Craig for the hurdles are
practically sure of their places. In
addition it is not at all unlikely that
Baier for the quarter, Carver for the
half, Jansen for the half and Cohn for
the dashes and hurdles will also be
taken to Syracuse. Lapsley may have
an opportunity to compete for Mich-
igan in the dashes and McNabb in the
hurdles. Other men who have a chance
at being taken to Syracuse are Cook
in the pole vault and White in the
high jump. The final choice for the
team will probably be made from this
list of men, with possibly one or two]
exceptions.
While the Michigan Varsity athletes
are competing in Syracuse, the rem-
.nants of the All-Fresh team will enter-
tain the M. A. C. Varsity at Waterman
gymnasium. In preparation for the
meet, the men who are eligible to com-
pete for the freshmen will hold tryouts]
all day on Wednesday. The men who
are to represent 1916 will be chosen
after their competition against time
or records on Wednesday, though it
is probable that past performances
will also be taken into account.
Prof. Knowlton Will Meet Classes.
Prof. J. C. Knowlton, of the law fac-
ulty, was able to be out yesterday and
expects to meet his classes today. An
attack of pleurisy has confined Mr.
Knowlton to his home for the past
week.

ORATORICAL PLAY TICKETS
TO BE PUT ON SALE TODAY.
a.
Reserved Seats for Goldoni's Comedy
Will be Free to Association
Members.
Seats for -"The Fan," e annual ora-
torical play, wNill be put on sale to as-
sociation and faculty? members this
afternoon and will be offered to the
public the remaining afternoons of the
week, including Friday, the day of the
production.
Persons holding tickets, which are
equivalent to membership in the vsso-
ciation, will be entitled to a 35 cent
reserved seat without charge, and will
have the privilege of securing a 50
cent reserved seat upon the payment
of the difference.
The sale will be held at the S. L. A.
window in University hall from 4:00
to 5:00 o'clock each afternoon othis
week. General admission has been set
at 25 cents.}
Saxophone Trio Party to be April 3.
The next party of the saxophone trio
will be held April 3, the Thursday Ve-
for spring vacation. This will be the
last regular party of the season and
will be informal.
Prof. Wilgus Met Classes Yesterday,
Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of the law de-
partment, met his classes yesterday
for the first time since his recent ill-
ness. Mr. Wilgus has been confined
to his home for more than a week with
la grippe.
SCIENTISTS WIN
HOCKEY PENNANT
Athletic Association Awards Cham-
pionships at Close of First Round
of Schedule.

TO

PUTS TABOO ON
OUT OF TOWN
CLASS AFFAIRS
Senate Council Adopts Resolution De
claring That All Functions Must
Hereafter Be Held in
A nn Arbor.
FACULTY FEELING HAS BEEN
GROWING FOR SEVERAL YEARS
Claim Students Take Advantage of
Their Temporary Freedom
From Supervision.
That banquets and other class func-
tions must be held in Ann Arbor in
the future, was the dictum of the sen-
ate council at its meeting last night.
A resolution was passed as follows::
"Resolved, That no class dinner,
banquet, or other class function
shall be given outside the city of
Ann Arbor without the consent of
the senate council."
Within the past few years faculty
sentiment has beeii growing stronger
against allowing classes to go out of
the city for their social affairs. Rea-
sons given are that at such gatherings
the students are away from all super-
vision and often take advantage of
these conditions.
MEMBERS OF UNION WILL DINE.
Secretary Shirley Smith to Preside at
Thursday Dinner.
Secretary Shirley Smith will preside
as toastmaster at the Union member-
ship dinner to be given Thursday ev-.
ching. There will be talks by C. B.
Vibbert, of the philosophy department,
Frank Gibbs, '13E, and E. B. Chaffee,
'13L. Another speaker will be an-
nounced tomorrow. Prof. W. D. Hen-
derson was to have spoken but owing
to an engagement which calls him to
Cleveland he will not be able to be
present.
The dinner will start promptly at
6:00 o'clock. Tickets are now on sale
and may be obtained at the desk in the
Union or from any member of the com-
mittee.
i I .
PICK WOMEN FOR
'14 PLAY CASTS
Names of Two Plays and Dramntis
Personae Wl Be Kept Secret
UntilNProducton.
WILL BE GIVEN APRIL 2 AND 3.
The names of the junior womenwho
will handle the principle roles in the
two plays which the third year women
will present April 2 and 3, were an-

PICK ALL - STAR

Final standing of Hockey
'I * * * * ' * * '

TEAM.
League:
* * *

*
*
*
*
*

Team Won Lost
Science ........3 0
Literary......2 1
Engineer.......1 2
Law ...........0 3
* * * * * * *

Pct.
1.000
.666
.333
.000
* *

*
*
*
*
*
,*

This

Year's Prints is Said to Be
Most Attractive of Any;
Price is 15 Cents. t

the

Posters for "Contrarie Mary," the
Michigan Union opera to be presented
March 26-29, were put on sale yester-
day. The prints sell for 15 cents, and
may be obtained at Wahr's. The 1913
poster is considered to be the most at-
tractive ever drawn for a Union opera,
and for this reason it is expected that
the sale will be large.
Rehearsals for the annual Union
show are being held every day, and ac-
cording to Director Bert St. John, the
material on hand is above the average.
The members of the cast have memor-
ized practically all of the book, and
the time between now and the first
performance will be devoted to polish-
ing up the action and lines.

Hockey formally closed its 1913 sea-
son last night when the science team
was awarded the pennant by the ath-
letic association. On account of weath-
er conditions the second round of the
schedule could not be completed, so
the ratings of the teams were made
entirely from their records in the first
section of the contests.
The science "six" went through with
a clear slate, while the lits were a
close second with only one defeat reg-
istered against them. The laws and
engineers did not play up to the pace
set by their, departmental rivals and
so are the members of the second di-
vision.
If weather had permitted the entire
schedule to be completed the standings
might have been a little closer, but
it is probable that the scientists would
have carried away the bunting. This
aggregation was composed of five
dents and one pharmic, all of whom
had chased the puck for otheramateur
teams before entering the university,
and so were able, regardless of their
lack of practice, to perform in winning
style in the icy square.
The season brought out some real
hockey material. All the scores have
been close and no team has had a
walkaway in any game. Handicapped
by the small-sized rink it was impos-
sible to use a full team, and only six
men were used in all the battles.
Among the 25 or more men perform-
ing upon the rink this seasons a first
class all-star team could be picked,
which would be a credit to any'univer-
sity when skating against rival insti-
tutions. The managers of the four
teams together with a few enthusias-
tic followers of the winter pastime,
will pick a seven composed of the men,
who in their judgment played the
most consistent game throughout the
season. This team will be announced
in The Michigan Daily.
"At Home" Cancelled Account Illness.1
Mrs. David Murray Cowie will bei
unable to be "at home" to college
girls today on account of illness.

nounced last evening.

There have

Former Student Is Principal Actor
In One Hour Six-Cylinder Elopement

been no definite cast assignments as
the plays are to be presented as
"grands" upon the senior women, and
according to an established custom
the names of the plays and ethe dra-
matis personae are not disclosed.
Those who will have parts. In the
large play written by Marjorie Nich-
olson are: Isabel Rizer, Marie Root,
Carol Dow, Irene Bigalke, Margaret
Irving, Nellie Hanna, Ilda Jennings,
Jessie- Cameron, Francis Lakin, Irma
Ilogadone, Hazel Albano, Ellen Riggs,
Maud Mills and Beatrice.Hopkins. The
quartet which will sing several selec-
tions is composed of: Mary Haynes,
Ethelwyn Robinson, Frances Ticknon
and May Connoly. The list of special
dancers is made up of: Emma Heath,
Jane'tte Higgins, Jean Scott, Beatrice
Merriam and Emily Gilfillan.
The second play which is a short
musical comedy written by Emily Gil-
fillan will be handled by Irene McCor-
mick, Louise Robson, Bessie Smurth-
waite, Delia Marks, 1Vladeline McVoy
and Phyllis Dunn.
These plays will be presented to uni-
versity women in Barbour gymnasium
April 2 at 8:00 o'clock. The follow-
ing afternoon they will be offered at
the annual woman's banquet to be held
in Barbour gym. In past years the
junior plays have been given in the

r Women Entertain Toda3
ions will be held this aft
university women in 1V
itchins' district beginning
>ck. Nine homes will be of
rmen incluing:Mr s. H.

ter-
drs.

Income Will Be Used For Benefit
Deserving Students From
Tlmt City.

of

An elopement featured in a big sir-
cylinder car is worthy of mention, but
when the solemnn "I wills" are pro-
nounced within sixty minutes from the
"honk!" at the curb, and the first ap-
pearance of the man-in-the-case at the
door, the event borders on the phe-
nomenal.
The residence, before which this car
stopped, was located in Los Angeles
and the man behind the wheel was R.'
C. Diggins, a one time aspirant to the
Varsity football team. When he reach-
ed front door he was received by Miss
Vera McKenzie, of Detroit, who was

his chum's sweetheart eight years ago
when he was attending the university.,
Since leaving school, Diggins has
been an aviator, a moving picture act-
or and coach of the high school foot-
ball team at Pasadena, Cal. Now he
is a full fledged eloper. As soon as
he 'learned that his roommate's "old
girl" was "in town" he started all six
cylinders and within one hour from
the time when he let them slow down
for a minute before Miss McKenzie's
residence, they, the sixes, were propell-
ing the very newly Mr. and Mrs Dig-
gins along the streets of unauspecting1
Los Angeles.'

at At. the initial meeting of the Toledo
pen Alumni Association of the University
B. of Michig'an at Toledo Saturday night,
M. the establishment of a loan fund to as-
C. sist students to go through the univer-
E. sity was the first step taken. Under

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