100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 09, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

The

Ml(hI'*gl

Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

No. 110.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY,, MARCH9, 1913.

PRIGE FIVEU

ENIORS LAND

I

i

THE WEATHER MAN

FIRST HONORS
IN. TRACK MEET
Prediction That Juniors Would Carry
Away Honors Is Upset by
Stars in Fourth
Year Class.
COHN'S LEAD OVER CRAIG IN
HURDLES JOLTS PROPHECIES
Haff's Work in 440, and Seward's Dash
Occasion Much Favorable'
Comment.

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Warmer,
with probably rain or snow.
University Observatory -Saturday,
7:00 p. n. temperature, 40.7; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
43.6; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 18.9; average wind veloci-
ty 8 miles per hour.
Capacity Crowd Attends Union Dance.
Last night's Union membership
dance was attended by 100 couples, the
entire number of tickets having been,
sold in advance. Prof. and Mrs W. G.
Hegner and Mr. and Mrs C. H. Conley
acted as chaperones.

ORATORS PREPARE
FOR ANNUAL PLAY
"Trihe Fan" to be Staged by Association
Next Friday Evening in
University Hail.
SPECIAL COSTMVIES TO BE USED
The date for the production of "The

COUNCIL TO TAKE
UP ROUTINE WORK
Conference Speeches and Band Topic
Expected to Come Up
For Discussion.
SPRING CONCERTS LOOKED FOR.
Routine business will occupy the at-

Fan," the oratorical association play, I tention of the student council at its1

Upsetting the predictions of a 1914 BISHOP W ILLIAMS

victory in a walkaway, the 1913 aggre-
gation of track stars won out in the
four-cornered Varsity track meet at
Waterman gymnasium last evening,
by the close margin of three points.
The seniors annexed a total score of
33 during the evening's competition,
while the juniors, failing to show in
several of the events in which they
were counted on to take one or more
places, had to remain content with a
total of 30 points.
The seniors and juniors divided
eight firsts on an equal basis, but the
seniors were ortunate enough to take
three extra points in the second and
third class, and thereby the winning
margin. The sophomore and fresh-
men teams failed to take one unquali-
fied first, though the sophomores split
first in the pole vault with the 1914
team, and with both class squads pick-
ing up a second or third wherever pos-
sible, the underclass teams scored a
total of nine points apiece.
The event in which the seniors real-
ly upset the dope was in the 40-yard
low hurdles. "Jimmie" Craig, expect-
ed to enter only in this one event, was
given first place in the meet by most
of the prophets. " Craig entered the
high hurdles, however, and after win-
ning this event, he lost out to "Dave"
Cohn of the 1913 team in the low bar-
rier event. Cohn's time was 5 1-5 sec-
onds.
Mile and 440 to Seniors.
The senior. team scored most heav-
ily in the 440-yard dash and mile run,
in both of which events the 1913 class-
men captured first and second. Sar-
gent's first in the high jump, Laps-
ley's second in the 35-yard dash, and
three points gathered' by Herschel
Smith and "Dave" Cohn in the shot
put, were also large factors in building
up the senior total.
The 35-yard dash was one of the
best events of the evening, although
Seward took the dash in predicted
fashion. With Seward, Lapsley, D.
Cohn and H. L. Smith in the finals, the
race was bound to be a close one.
When the men came down the stretch
to the finish line they were nearly
abreast, and it is doubtful if space
could be seen between them. Seward
was the victor, however, with Laps-
ley a close second and Smith a good
third.
Haff's stellar performance in the
440-yard dash brought out no end of
favorable comment. Though the
Michigan leader was in no danger of
being headed, he exerted himself to
the utmost and finished in the excel-
lent time of 52 1-5 seconds. A great
many supporters believed that Haff
had broken the track record for the
quarter, but investigation brought to
light the fact that Keck made the dis-
tance in 51 4-5 in the Michigan-Cor-
nell meet of March 26, 1910. This fact
did not take away from Haff's bril-
liant performance, however, nor from
the fact that Baier ran a good second.
High Jump is Popular.
The competition between Sargent of
the 1913 team, and White of the 1914

AT UNION TODAY
Episcopal . Dignitary is Principal
Number on the Sunday
Afternoon Program.
ALEXANDER SPEAKS NEXT WEEK,
The Right Rev. Charles D. Williams,
bishop of the Episcopal church of
Michigan,will speak at this afternoon's
meeting at the Union. Bishop Will-
iams is almost as well known for his
forceful personality, and his partici-
pation in practical affairs, as he is for
his work in the field of religion.
Albert G. Goetz, '13L, will furnish
the musical numbers on the program,
which will start promptly at 3:00
o'clock.
Kirkland B. Alexander, who was ex-
pected to appear today, will be the
speaker next Sunday afternoon. The
following week Hugh Black, of the
Union Theological Seminary, in New
York City, a prominent author and
preacher, will be present. The Man-
dolin and Glee clubs respectively will
furnish the music for these programs.
class, in the high jump brought out
round after round of applausefrom
the spectators. Sargent took the event
with the bar at a height of 6 feet, 2
inches, with White clearing 6 feet, 1
inch. Actual measurement from the
mat showed that Sargent's winning
leap was for a height of 5 feet, 11 3-4
inches. After the event the bar was
placed at a height of 6 feet, 2 inches
by actual measurement from the mat,
and Sargent made two attempts to
leap it, but did not succeed in either
of the trials.
The summaries for last evening's
meet follow:
Final score-Seniors 33, Juniors 30,
Sophomores 9, Freshmen 9.
Pole Vault-Cook (1914) and Das-
kam (1915) tied for first, height 10
feet, 6 inches; Chatfield (1916) and
Bruch (1916) tied for third, height 10'
feet, 3 inches.
Shot Put-Kohler (1914) first, dis-
tance 44 feet, 9 inches; H. Smith(1913)
second, 38 feet, 5 inches; D. Cohn
(1913) third, 34 feet, 7 1-2 inches.
High Jump-Sargent (1913) first,'
height 6 feet, 2 inches. (Actual meas-
urement from the mat gave the height
5 feet, 11 3-4 inches.) White (1914)
second, 6 feet, 1 inch; Perkins (1915)
third, 5 feet, 8 inches.
35-yard Dash-Seward, Brown, D.
Cohn, H. L. Smith, and Lapsley, quali-
fied for the finals. Seward (1914)
first; Lapsley (1913) second; H. L.
Smith (1916) third. Time 4 1-5 sec-
ond.
40-yard High Hurdles-Craig, Mc-
Nabb, Greene and Armstrong quali-
fied for the finals. Finals-Craig,
(1914) first, Armstrong (1916) second;
McNabb (1915) third. Time 5 3-5 sec-
onds.
40-yard Low Hurdles-Craig, D.
(Continued on page 4).

has been set for Friday, March 14.
The play will be given in University
Hall, and the carpenters will begin
work tomorrow on the special staging
which has been planned. The costum-
es have been ordered from the Whitney
Scenery and Costume Co., of Detroit,
and will arrive in time for the dress
rehearsal.Thursday night.
Practicing has been going on near-
ly every night since the Christmas hol-
idays, and the play is already running
smoothly. There were two rehearsals
yesterday, and after the evening ses-
sion Director R. D. T. Hollister stated
that this year's production would ex-
cell- "Honeymoon," which was given
last year.
EDITORS OF PUBLICATIONS
TOB E DECIDED ON SATURDAY
The board in control of student pub-
lications, at its meeting yesterday, de-
cided to elect next year's officers for
the Students' Directory and the Wol-
verine at its meeting next Saturday
morning.
SENIOR WOMEN MEET AT THE
UNION TO DINE AND DANCE.
Senior women held the second of a
series of luncheons yesterday after-
noon at the Union, followed by a
dance. Announcement was made at
this time that women may still. enroll
in the course in dramatic technique,
which began Friday under Prof. L. A.
Strauss. This course is given in prep-
aration for the senior play.
FIRST "PAY-ENTER" CAR WILL
COMMENCE DUTY HERE TODAY
Officials of the Detroit United Rail-
way ,announce that the first of the
"pay-enter" cars will be run today on
the university-depot line. The re-
mainder of this division will be equip-
ped with new cars by the end of the
month. Hereafter all cars will stop
on the near side of the street.
Will Hold Third Fischer Party Friday.
Tickets for the third Fischer party
of the season, to be given Friday night+
at Granger's were placed on sale yes-
terday. The number of admission
cards will be limited to 70.
One Alumnus Stars in Another's Play.
Donald Stuart, '03, A.M. '04, instruc-
tor in modern languages at Princeton,7
has written a play entitled "The De-
ceiver.- Norman Hackett, '94-'95, is
playing the leading part.
Leaves 'College For Vaudeville Stage.0
Edward W. Ham, '15, has left college
to go into vaudeville work. Ham left+
Ann Arbor Friday night, and will make
his first appearance on the vaudevillel
stage tomorrow.

regular bi-weekly meeting to be held
in the oratorical room Tuesday even-
ing at 7:00 o'clock. A report will be
heard from the committee having in
charge the securing of Judge James
Murfin, of Detroit, and Prof. Evans
Holbrook, of the law department, to
discuss the Conference question with
members of the organization.
The band committee's findings will
also be presented to the council at
this time. It is not known exactly
what action has. been taken by the
council's committee, but it is believed
that Varsity band conditions will be
remedied, and that the customary an-
nual spring concerts will be heard
again this season.
Prof. Aubrey Tealdi, of the land-
scape designing course, and S. H.
Marks,superintendent of buildings and
grounds, will probably address the
council on the subject of "Campus
Beautification."
WRESTLERS FAIL TO SECURE
FALLS IN SATURDAY MATCHES.
In the two matches which were
wrestled yesterday afternoon at Wat-
ermgn gym, in the heavy and middle-
weight classes, none of the contest-
ants were able to get a fall registered
to his credit.
Watson and Handy, in the heavy-
weight class, struggred for 30 minutes
without either pair of shoulders being
forced to the mat. In the middle-
weight division, Harris and Bleisch
took the mat and stayed the full time
without a fall.
GERMAN TEACHER TO EXPLAIN
MUSICAL QUALITY OF SPEECH.
,"The Melody of Speech" is the sub-
ject on which Prof. Felix Krueger, of
the University of Halle, Germany, will
speak tomorrow afternoon, at 4:10
o'clock, in the west physics lecture
room. The lecture is open to all and
no admission fee will be charged.
Cohocta Grange Hears Prof. Anderson
Prof. H. C. Anderson of the mechan-
ical engineering department, returned-
yesterday from Livingston county,
where he addressed the Cohocta
Grange on "The Heating of Homes."
Driver Hurt When Car Strikes Wagon.
A city car struck a wagon at the
corner of Packard street and Fifth av-
enue yesterday afternoon at 5:30
o'clock, throwing the driver of the ve-
hicle to the ground. The man was not
seriously injured.
Grand Rapids Club May Secure House
If plans now being considered by
members of the Grand Rapids' club
are carried out, this organization will
occupy a house of its own next year.
It is expected that half of the mem-
bership may be accommodated in the
clubhouse.

MAY LIMIT ACTIVITIES OF WOMEN
Faculty Committee Considers Plan to
Introduce Point System.
At its meeting yesterday afternoon,
the non-athletic committee expressed
itself as being in favor of limiting the
number of honorary offices which
women of the university may hold.
No definite action was taken.
It has been proposed that the vari-
ous offices in the different classes and
other campus organizations be rated
at a certain number of points, and that
a limit be placed on the number of
points which any one woman may
obtain. A system now in operation at
the Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology, and at Mt. Holyoke College, is
being used as a basis for the new
project.
TICKET SALE FOR
FESTIVAL BEGINS
Number of Admissions Sold Yesterday
Shows Large Increase Over
1912 Record.
COMPLETE DETAILS FOR SERIES.
Tickets for the annual May Festival
were put on sale yesterday at the Uni-
versity School of Music, and eight tim-
es as many seats were sold as compdr-
ed with the entire first week's sale of
last year.
A large number of mail orders for
reservation of tickets has been receiv-
ed by the management, as a result of
the circulars that were recently sent
throughout the state. Unsold tickets
may be procured any day until March
30 at the School of Music.
Detailed arrangements for the fes-
tival are well under way. An agree-
ment has been made with the Detroit
United Railway, whereby special cars
for both Detroit and Jackson will leave
the Hill Memorial auditorium imme-
diately after the concert each evening.
ALPHA NU DECIDES ON ITS
INITIATE DEBATING TEAM.,
Alpha Nu literary society chose its,
initiate debating team at the regular;
meeting held last evening. E. W.,
Hoogsteen, '14, Maurice Weinberger,
'16, and Wilber M. Brucker, '16, with;
Walter E. Rankin, '16, as alternate
were selected to represent Alpha Nu,
In the annual initiates' debate with the
Adelphi society, which will take place,
after spring vacation.
"PROF." ISSUE OF GARGOYLE
APPEARS LAST OF THIS WEEK.,
Impertinent and foolish, the faculty;
number of the Gargoyle is to make its,
appearance the last of this week. Deep
secrets and much hitherto unpublished
aid original matter will be brought to1
light for the first time, according to
the management.
CIVIC HEAD SPEAKS TODAY
ON NEEDS OF MODERN CITY.
Mr. Frank Almendinger, president of
the Ann Arbor Civic Improvement as-
sociation, will address the Chinese Stu-
dents' club this afternoon at 4:00,
o'clock in McMillan hall. He will
speak on "The Needs of aModern City;
and How They May be Met," and will,
show how practical problems can1
be solved by the cooperation of intel-;
ligent people.
EarI Moore to Study Music in Paris.-
Earl V. Moore, '12, will leave for
Paris within six weeks to continue the

study of music. He will take instruc-
tions under Windor, the well-known{
Parisian teacher. Moore has been as-
sistant to Prof A. A. Stanley, of the
School of Music, for several months.

FOREIGNERS IN
UNIVERSITY TO.
GET CLUBHOUSE.
Cosmopolitan Club, With Aid of Allied
Association, Plans to Erect
Home of Its Own
Here.
INSTITUTION WILL GIVE AID
TO ALL MEN OF OTHER LANDS.
Rooms Will be Decorated in Styles
of Various Nations; Senior
Draws Plans.
A clubhouse to serve the -purpose
of a congregating place for all foreign
students in Ann Arbor, and to cater to
their needs, is now an immediate prob-
ability, and the Corda-Fratres Cosmo-
politan clubhouse announces that it is
in a position to push the erection of
such an edifice.
Funds for the purpose are being
raised from several sources. The
Cosmopolitan club alumni are being
canvassed, and it is expected that a
generous response will result. The
international peace societies are deep-
ly interested in the experiment, and
some of the wealthy members have
come forward with aid.
The need of such a clubhouse is be-
lieved to be imperative by all convers-
ant with the situation of the foreign-
ers at Michigan. The house will be
open to all foreign students, whether
members of the Corda-Fratres Cos-
mopolitan club or not, and necessary
assistance will be rendered them. The
Cosmopolitan club, however, will as-
sume the management of the house,
and for this purpose the entire gov-
ernment of the club has been Teorgan-
ized, and busienss and faculty men ad-
mitted to membership on the adminis-
trative board of the club.
Will Offer Varied Menus.
A distinctive feature of the new club
house will be the serving of food pe-
culiar to various nationalities, and
foreign students will be able to ob-
tain their own native dishes at all
times. The dining room will also be
open to Americans.
The various rooms will be decorated
after the fashion of national halls.
Each room of this kind will contain
equipment and furnishing character-
istic of some nation. No dormitories
will be maintained, but the club house
will serve the foreigners much in the
same way that the Michigan Union.
meets the needs of the other. students
of the campus.
Victor Bonilla, '13E, of Columbia,
S. A., is drawing the plans for the neW
edifice. Accommodations for a large
(Continued on page 4).
BALANCE OF CORNELL MEET
TICKETS TO BE DISTRIBUTED
Students Drawing Blanks to Be Given
Another Opportunity
Tomorrow.

Next Friday, Mar.14
ANNUAL PENNY SOCIAL
McMillan Hall
Presbyterian C. E.

There are 75 tickets for the Cornell
Michigan indoor meet of March 22
which were not taken up at the offic
of the athletic association yesterday
Tomorrow morning at 9:00 o'clock,
all thoseupperclassmen andhm.ember
of the graduate school, who drew~
blanks in the first drawing for seats
may present' coupo~n number 14, prop
erly stamped for identification, an
have a second opportunity to draw fo
the tickets.
A steady stream of students poure
into the athletic office all day yester
day for the purpose of procuring th
Cornell pasteboards, but notwithstand
ing this fact, there were still a larg
number of seats in the east, nort
and south stands left.

2,

Rev.

E.

Wiourner Allen,
Washington street Congregational Church, Toledo, Ohio

D.

D.

iChurch Tonight

Union Ser

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan