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March 08, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-08

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LOCAL $1.50,
MAIL $2.00

I

The

Michigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

XXIII, No. 109.'

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1913.

PRIOR F'IVEU*CENTS

c

PICK JUNIORS
WINNERS OF

THE

WEATHER

MAN

z

VARSITY MEETI

Campus Sentiment Favors'

Third Year
Furnish

Class, ,but Seniors Will
Good Competi.
tioti.

CAPTAIN HAFF MAY RUN
IN HALF-MILE TONIGHT.

New, Gym Records are Expected
be Set ib 440 and High
Jump.

to

Forecast for Ann Arbor.-Saturday,
cold and fair; moderately westerly
wind.
University Observatory. - Friday,
7,00 p. m., temperature 14.8; maximuri
temperature 24 hours preceding, 19.4;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 1.6; average wind velocity 10
miles per hour.
TOLEDO MEN BANQUET THIS
EVENING TO FORM CLUB.
Michigan alumni and students of To-
ledo and vicinity will banquet at the
Toledo Commerce club in that city to-
night. After the dinner the meeting
will be devoted to establishing and or-
ganizing the University of Michigan
club of Toledo.
Wilfred B. Shaw, secretary of the
alumni association will give a short
talk at the dinner, and a glee club
quartet will sing a few selections.
MUST DRAW TODAY
FOR CORNELL MEET

i
f
',
.r
f
f
I
e

PRESENTS ANNUAL
CONCERT TO MANY
Glee and llandolin Clubs Entertain-
ment Given to Largest At-
tendai ce in Years.
NEW STUNTS FEATURE PROGRAM.
Presenting a program that vacillated
almost momentarily from the comical
to the sublime, the University of Mich-
igan Glee and Mandolin clubs gave
their annual home concert before 1,300
persons last evening in University
Hall.

JUNIOR LAWS WIN
FROMFRESH MEDICS
Barristers Take Most One-Sided Con-
test of Interclass Series;
Score 41 to 18.
PLAY J ENGINEERS FOR TITLE.
By romping away with a 41 to 18
victory over the fresh medics last night
the junior laws won the right to play
against the junior engineers for the
campus basketball championship Mon-
day night.
The game was the most one-sided
contest that has been played in the
interclass series this season. From
the first whistle the laws took charge
of the festivities and the medics had
no chance to win.
Cory, the fleet forward, was the
chief counter for the laws. He located
the iron circle ten times from the field
and added one more point to his string
by throwing a foul, making a total of
21 to his credit. Tower at guard for
the winners also played a strong game,
making six baskets and keeping his
man harmless at all times.
For the medics, Statz at forward
played the most consistently. He made
two remarkable shots from the cen-
ter of the field. Seeley playing at
guard also aided materially in the
point getting for the doctors.
The summaries are as follows:

Though every class team entered in
the four-cornered Varsity meet this
evening has a group of loyal support-
ers, campus sentiment seems to favor
the juniors to win from the other three
teams without the slightest degree of
uncertainty. It is expected that the
seniors will furnish good competition,
but no intense opposition is expected
from the sophomore and freshmen
teams. The freshmen team was ex-
pected to put up a good fight for first
place until eight men of better than
average ability were declared ineligi-
ble by the faculty.
Nearly all men entered in the
meet are in first class shape accord-
ing to Trainer Farrell, and from all
indications the meet promises to be a
lively one from start to finish. Inas-
much as the meet will give Michigan
students their first real opportunity to
see the full strength of the Michigan
track squad, and competition between
veterans and novices, a large crowd is
expected.

Predictions of Meet
Sargent will start the ball rolling by
appropriating five points in the high
jump for the seniors, and the remain-
ing points will fall either to Perkins
for the men of '15, or White of the jun-
iors. First place in the short dash.
would seem to be the personal prop-
not been slightly injured in a collision
with another runner. Trainer Farrell
expects him to get into the meet, but
in the event of his defection, Lapsley
can be relied upon to cabture the
points. H. L. Smith for the fresh, is
looked to follow these two men closely.
Craig may be in shape to win both the
low and high hurdles, leaving the oth-
er places to be contested among
Greene, Armstrong, McNabb and the
two Cohn brothers.
Haff May Run in 880.
Trainer Farrell waxes enthusiastic
when the name of Haff, as a middle
distance runner is brought into the
conversation. He advances the opin-
ion that Haff is not only one of the
best quarter-milers in the country, but
that with practice in the half he
would rank equally as high. There is
a possibility of Haff running the 880,
tonight, but if he concentrates on the
quarter, it would not be surprising to
see the gym record in that event go by
the boards.
Baier and Jansen, seniors and jun-
iors, respectively will trail Haff in the
quarter, and Carver, with Haff out of
the way, will hand the juniors the 880_
run. Uffer should come in for second
or third in this distance. The seniors
will get 5 more points in the mile
from Haimbaugh, the juniors will get
3 points from Brown, and the remain-
ing one point will lie between Rich-
ards and Lynch of the freshmen.
Through the efforts of Cook, the jun-I
iors will have a first, added to their
score in the pole vault, with Daskam,
(Continued on page 4).
DECLARES WILSON'S ADDRESS
GIRATEST INAUGURAAL SPEECH

After Tonight Athletic Association
Will Not Guarantee Tickets
to Upperclassmen.
OFFICE OPEN FROM 9:00 to 5:30.
Today will be the last day on which
upperclassmen and members of the
graduate school may procure tickets
for the Michigan Cornell track meet
of March 22. After today the athletic
association has announced that it can-
not guarantee an opportunity to get
tickets on the first drawing. It is also
announced, however, that on Monday,
providing there are any tickets for the
meet left,those who have drawn blanks
will have an opportunity for a second
drawing.
In order that all who care to draw
today rAay be accommodated, the office
of the athletic association will be open
from 9:00 to 5:30, with no intermis-
sion for the noon hour. If there are.
tickets left, the office will be open for
the second drawing on Wednesday at
9:00 o'clock.
Those who have drawn blanks and
desire a second drawing must show
coupon number 14 with the proper
identification mark upon it placed
there by the officials of the athletic as-
sociation for the emergency.
ECCENTRIC COSTUMES VOGUE
AT WOMEN'S PARTY TONIGHT.

Every number was applauded to
such a degree that continued encores
became a matter of course. The crowd
was the largest that has attended a
musical clubs' entertainment in a
number of years, and the bubbling en-
thusiasm of the popular portion of the
program was soon communicated to
the audience.
From a purely musical standpoint,
the number entitled "Keep a Goin',"
by, the Glee club, was probably the
best rendered piece on the program.
The swinging melody of this selection,
combined with the highly effective
blending of tones in the closing
strains, made this number the most
pleasing of the entire repertoire offer-
ed by the singers.
All of the numbers rendered by the
Glee club proved popular with the au-
dience, but "The Tinkers' Chorus"
came in for the largest amount of ap-
plause. The work of the Varsity quar-
tet, both serious and frolicsome, was
also well received.
The "Old Irish Song," a solo by
Kenneth N. Westerman, '14 with the
assistance of the Glee club, displayed
the soloist's clear tenor voice to ad-
vantage.
The work of the Mandolin club, es-
pecially, in "Naughty Marietta," and
the following encores, contributed
largely to the success of the concert.
The offerings of the instrumentalists
showed a marked improvement over
the selections played by them on their
last appearance here.
The concert was announced as a
popular affair, and the features intro-
duced amply warranted this appela-
tion. "The Midnight Sons' Quartet,"
although only organized one week, and
still showing lack of polished work,
made an excellent impression, and
proved especially entertaining in its
rendition of "My Ragtime Fireman."
The stunts by "Bill" Williams, '14E,
which constituted the fifth number of
the program, also made a hit.
The Musical clubs' treasury was
augmented to the extent of about $400
by last night's concert. This money
will be used to help defray the expen-
ses of the trip to the Pacific coast next
month.
FESTIVAL SEATS GO ON SALE.
First Block Sell for $6.50 and $3.50;
to be Reduced Next Week.
The first block of seats for the May
festival goes on sale this morning at
8:00 o'clock at the office of the
School of Musi. This block includes
the best seats in the new Hill Audito-
rium, where the Festival will be given..
Initial prices beginning today will be
$6.50 for the entire five concerts, or
$3.50 if the purchaser holds a course
ticket for the winter concerts to ex-
change.
These prices will continue for one
week, and on Saturday March 15 the
prices for Block A will be reduced to
$6.00 and 3.00.
SENIOR LIT WOMEN WILL
DINE AT UNION TODAY.
Senior lit women will dine at the'
Union this noon at 12:00 o'clock in
the second of a series of dinners given
by the women of the class. Discus-
sions on the plans for the big women's
banquet to be held April 3 will take
place.

1914 Laws
Cory........... .L.F.
McCoy, Helm......R.F.
Collette........... C.
Tower, Kerwin.... L.G.
Wright........... R.G.

1916 Medics
.. Statz
.. Courier,
Henderson
..........May
.... Baker,
Tappan
.......Seeley

THREE WRESTLING BOUTS ARE
SCHEDULED THIS AFTERNOON.
Three bouts are schedule4 on the
wrestling tournament for this after-
noon. Those who will work on the
mat are as follows:
Light weight-below 133 pounds;
Champ vs. Demon.
Middle Weight-below 158 pounds;
Bleich vs. Harris.
Heavy weights-above 158 pounds;
Watson vs. Handy.
The match between Harris and
Bleich will decide which man is to
tussle with Amtsbeuchler for the mid-
dle weight championship. These two
middle weights battled or 45 minutes
last season before Harris's shoulders
were pinned to the mat by Bleisch, so
it is sure to be a lengthy struggle this
afternoon before the verdict is. given.
The semi-finals in the other classes
will be wrestled next week, so that
next Saturday the finals in all weights
can be staged.
MAKE CHANGES IN
ORGAN EQUIPMENT
University Authorities to Add Echo
Organ and Movable Keyboard for
New Columbian Instrument.
TO BE READY FOR MAY FESTIVAL
In moving the Columbian organ into
the new Hill Auditorium the univer-
sity authorities are contemplating
many changes in the equipment.
Among the most important are the
installation of a small echo organ and
a new movable key-board.
The latest type of movable key-
board will be used. It will operate
on 125 feet of free cable, thus enabling
the organist to take any position he
wants on or off stage.
A small echo organ will be built
high up on the ceiling, operated by
the same key-board. With the excel-
lent accoustic features afforded by the
new building this combination should
offer great possibilities to a capable
organist. A feature of this supple-
mentary organ will be a set of cathe-;
dral chimes comprised of 20 notes.
For the last six weeks Harry R.
Law, representing the Hutchings Or-
gan Co. of Boston, has been at work
taking down the organ from its placeI
in University Hall, in preparation for
its removal to the auditorium. This
end of the work is now practically
completed. The ceiling decorators in7
the new building completed their work
yesterday, giving the organ men a
chance to get in. Mr. Law's force
will soon be supplemented by seven
expert organ builders, and work will1
be rushed to completion for the May
Festival.
The 4,000 original pipes will be put
in place, and will be supplemented by"
500 additional ones, making the organ3
one of the largest in the country. An
idea of the range of tone thus afford-E
ed may be realized when it is consid-
ered that the pipes vary in length
from 32 feet to 3-8 of an inch.
LIT AND SCIENCE TEAMS}
BATTLE FOR TITLE TODAY

FACULTY MEN
FAVOR ANNUAL
.ALUMNI PRIZE

Prof. Davis
For

SENTIMENT IS PREVALENT
AGAINST MONETARY PRIZE

Women will serve luncheon in cos-
tumes of shamrock at the St. Patrick
fancy dress party given in Barbour
gym this evening at 8:00 o'clock. Priz-
es are offered for all eccentric cos-
tumes and a forfeit will be imposed
upon those who attend in plain dress.
Mrs. Gilbert Barnes, Mrs. Lawrence
Johnson and Mrs. Waldo Abbott will
act as judges.
A short play is to be presented dur-
ing the luncheon. General admission
is 15 cents, to league members 10
cents.
Senior Laws Elect Class Valedictorian
Charles Avery was elected valedicto-
rian by the senior law class yesterday.
Avery and Sidney Doyle were the can-
didates who received the highest num-
ber of votes in last week's election
when no majority was reached. In
yesterday's ballot Avery received 75
votes against Doyle's 53.
Soph Lits Will Dance on Thursday.
Soph lits will hold a dance next-
Thursday night at Grangers. The
number of tickets is limitedto 90 and
over half of them have already been
sold. They may be procured from any
member of the social committee.

Proposes Hall of Fame
Michigan Alumni
in Memorial
Building.

Plan Suggested by Secy.Smith
Being Considered by New
York Alumni.

Final score-laws, 41; medics, 18.
Field goals-Cory, 10; Tower, 6;
Wright, 2; Collette, 2; Statz, 4; Seel-
ey, 3; Henderson, 1; May, 1.
Fouls-Cory 1.
Referee-Ratschaefer.
HONORS CHINESE STUDENTS.
Tau Beta Pi Elects First Men From
New Republic.
H. Y. Tang, and S. H. Waung, two
of the 15 junior engineers elected
Thursday to Tau Beta Pi, are the first
Chinese students who have been hon-
ored by the local chapter.
Both Tang and Waung were sent
by the Chinese government to this
country in September 1910. They will
return to China after graduation to
serve the government for a period of
five years in accordance to contracts
which they agreed upon with the Bu-
reau of the Chinese Educational Mis-
sion to the U. S. A. before they came
to this country.
Tang graduated from the Canton
Christian college, Canton, China, and
Waung attended St. John's college,
Shanghai, China.
Millard and Neilson Win Prizes.
G. F. Millard, '16, and R. H. Neilson,
'14, won the prizes awarded to high
men at the Union card party last night.
Auction bridge was the game featured
this week There were only eight ta-
bles of players, a slight falling off
from previous attendances, due no
doubt to the fact that auction bridge is
not played by so many as five hundred
and other games.
GRAD WRITES ON HIGHER
EDUCATION IN LATIN-AMERICA
Edgar E. Brandon, '88, who was sent
by the -Pan-American union to get first
hand information concerning higher
education in the Latin American re-
public, has returned to Washington
after a trip which lasted nearly a year.
He visited every university in Pana-
ma, PeJu, Bolivia, Chili, Uruguay, Ar-
gentina, Brazil, Venezuela and Costa
Rica. He has given an interesting ac-
count of the unique educational sys-
tems and facilities found in these coun-
tries in the bulletin of the Pan-Amer-
ican Union.

Now

Secretary Shirley W. Smith's recent
suggestion to the Michigan alumni of
New York city that a prize be offered
each year to the graduate making the
most important contribution to the
human welfare met with the enthusias-
tic approval of prominent faculty men
last night.
While few of the professors inter-
viewed offered any definite opinion as
to what such a prize should be, there
was a unanimous sentiment against a
monetary reward. All maintained that
a careful administration of the awards
whereby no field of human endeavor
would be overlooked was essential to
the success of the plan.
Prof. Calvin 0. Davis, of the depart-
ment of education,proposed the institu-
tion of a Michigan hall of fame in the
Alumni memorial building, where a
tablet, or bust or picture of the most
worthy alumnus of each year might
be placed as a tribute to his achieve-
ments.
"Such a prize if it Is offered," said
Prof. Davis, "should be a mark of rec-
ognition of worthy accomplishments
rather than a direct inducement in it-
self, as a monetary prize might' be-
come. At any rate, any cash sum of-
fered probably would prove paltry to
the man who deserved it.
Favors Tablet in Memorial Hall.
"I believe that the erection of a tab-
let to the most deserving alumnus each
year would be a suitable form of rec-
ognition. A room might be set aside
in the Memorial building for this pur-
pose."
Prof. Henry C. Adams, of the eco-
nomics department, similarly opposed
a monetary prize, while heartily en-
dorsing the plan.
"Michigan has set a standard for
modesty in recalling the deeds of her
alumni," said Prof. Adams. "Although
it has sent out many men into govern-
mental affairs and the technical world,
it has been the last one to blow its
horn, and I should hate to see it begin
now.
"However, if properly administered,
such a prize would stimulate graduat-
es for action in fields other than com-
mercial. For this reason I regard the
scheme as highly commendable."
erty of "Howdy" Seward, if he had
Prof. Wenley Pleads for Ideal.
Pointing out the danger that the
practical interests might be permitted
to crowd out the ideal, Prof. Robert M.
Wenley pleaded for a varied repre-
sentation on the board or committee
which would make the awards.
"The most wonderfful man that
Michigan ever produced," said Dr.
Wenley, "was James Craig Watson,
the astronomer. At the present time-
there is the danger that a man in such
a field might be overlooked.
"The plan is not only unique but ad-
inirable. I sincerely hope that it will
be adopted and carried out wisely."
Prof. Filibert Roth, of the forestry
department, held that while the move-
(Continued on page 4.)
PREMANADA DAS, '12P, TALKS
BEFORE THE PRESCOTT CLUB

Last

Year Champs Out For Revenge
and Expect to Tie
Up Series.

Owing to the forfeiture of two games
by the laws and engineers to the sci-
ence team the championship issue
will be fought out this afternoon be-
tween the lit and science teams at
2:30 o'clock at Weinberg's rink.
The science hockeyites are virtually
champions with a perfect record to
their credit, but the last year cham-
pions are out for blood and fully ex-
pect to land the big end of the score
today. If their expectations are rea-
lized the series will be tied up neces-
sitating another game to decide the
better aggregation.

President Woodrow Wilson's inaug-'
ral address was referred to by Prof.
. M. Wenley yesterday in his ethics
ass as the greatest of these address-
ever given.
"These words are not those of a
hilosopher-although they might well
e-but of the president of the United
ates speaking in the greatest inaug-
ral address ever delivered," he de-
ared. "Why? Because he is a schol-

I'

Gargoyle Will Issue "Profs" Number.
The "Profs" issue of the Gargoyle
will appear March 15, in which the
faculty will be treated from every
angle. A complete disclosure of the
inner workings of the intellects of
these beings is promised by the man-
agement of the campus humor maga-

Newberry Hall Tea Room is a Success Prof. Lane Leaves on Legal Business.
Newberry hall's tea room this week I Grand Rapids Men May Have a House. Prof. V. C. Lane, of the law faculty,
has already eclipsed last week's record Men from Grand Rapids held a left yesterday for a trip through the
of patronage reaching an average of smoker at the Union last night. Be- northern part of the state visiting
100 a day. Home cooking is being sides the social part of the meeting Ionia, Grand Rapids, Mackinaw and
served every college day from 12:00 some routine business was taken up, Bay City. Private legal business is the
until 1:00 o'clock and from 3:00 until and plans were discussed for securing cause of is trip and he will return to-
5:00 o'clock. .a house for the club next year. morrow.

Premnanada Das, '12P, of Bengal, In-
dia, addressed the Prescott club last
night on "Antitoxins anid Serums." He
illustrated his lecture with lantern
slides explaining the preparation of
vaccine.
After completing his course -here
Das has been pursuing advanced work
at Harvard in the field of serums and
it is his intention to return to his na-
tive country and aid in the widen ra

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