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March 07, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-07

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The

Michigan

Daily

I MAIL $2.00

I, No. 108.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1913.

PRICID FIVE

PRICE FIVE

s

BADLY

I

THE WEATHER

MAN

'LED FOR'

RSITY MEET

nt Ones, Specialists
pective Events, Are
ible For Contest
norrow Night.

in

TANDING OF
MATERIAL IS

GO

Battle For First Place Will
Between Junior and Senior
Classes.

OD
Be

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Friday, un-
settled, probably light snow; colder,
zero.
University Observatory- Thursday,
7:00 p. in., temperature 7.4; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding
30.8; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding 3.2; wind velocity 17 miles
per hour.
SENIOR LITS CONDUCT BIG
CAMPAIGN FOR CLASS DUES.
More than 340 senior lits paid their
class dues in the two day campaign
that ended Wednesday afternoon.
About 1,900 invitations and 115 canes
have been ordered.
Those who were delinquent in paying
their dues will be notified by postal
card and will be given another chance
to pay on Tuesday afternoon from 1:00
to 5:30 o'clock in University hall. In-
vitations and canes may also be order-
ed for the last time.
CHAMPION OF LAST
YEAR DEADLOCKED,
In Yesterday's Wrestling Match, Doyle
Is Held Powerless by Lewis For
Thirty Minutes.

MANY STUNTS
WILL FEATURE
HOME CONCERT
University of Michigan Musical Clubs
to Offer New Program at Annual
Performance Tonight in
University Hall.
FOUR "MIDNIGHT SONS" TO
SING ANTI-CLASSICAL AIRS.
Is Last Appearance of Musicians Before
Trip to Pacific Coast; Tickets
Sell Fast.

STUDENTS ARE
INTERESTED IN-
SOCIAL WORK
Arthur E. Gilman, '14, of Industrial
Organization Has Spoken Three
Times to Workingmen
of Ann Arbor.
Y. M. C. A. WORKER SUGGESTS
PLAN FOR FORMING SOCIETY.
Body, of About Forty Students, is Not
Yet Complete But Committee
of Five is Appointed.

COMMUNICATION.

(This paper assumes no responsibility
for sentiments expressed in com-
munications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily-
Griffins, interdepartmental society,
at its meeting Thursday evening,March
6, unanimously adopted the following
resolution:
Whereas, It is not in accord with the
best interests of either the Michigan
Union or the Y. M. C. A. for these two
organizations to unite in a joint cam-
paign for building funds, be it
Resolved, That the Michigan Union
start an active solicitation of funds
for a new building as soon as possible,
and not combine with the Y. M. C. A.
In this campaign.
CARL EBERBACH, '16M.
Membership Dance Tickets Go Fast.
More than fifty of the one hundred
tickets for the Union membership
dance tomorrow night have been sold.
Maurice Lohman, '15M, is chairman
of the committee in charge of the
dance. Other members of the commit-
tee are, Chester Lang, '15, T. J. Caley,
'14L, and J. R. Lisa, '14M.
TO ATTEND ANNUAL
PEACE CONFERENCE

FIFTEEN MEN
ELECTED TO
TAU BETA

Chances for the class of 1916 to win
LO four-cornered Varsity track meet,'
be staged in Waterman gymnasium
morrow evening, have been consid-
ably lessened by the announcement
f the entry list,, revised on a basis of
Igibility. The final entries lack the
ames of eight freshmen aspirants be-
,use of deficiencies in their scholas-
e records for last semester.
Phelps and Quail, weight men, Es-
ry, Shulkin and C. B. Smith, middle
stance runners, and Murphy and
ay, specialists in the mile, have been
clared ineligible by the faculty and
ill not be allowed to compete in the
arsity meet tomorrow evening. Sev-
al of these men were regarded as
ire point winners on the basis of their
rformances in the preliminary and
esh soph meet, and their absence
ill be keenly felt by the members of
e verdant class.
The same list which points out the
eakening of the freshmen team,
ows that few, if any, of the senior,
nior or sophomore athletes will be
Aiged to stay out of the meet because
scholastic standing. The candi-
tes for the 1913 Varsity track team
,me through the semester practically
iscathed, which means not only that
e class teams of 1913, 1914, and 1915
[11 have their full strength in the
(Continued on page 4.)
M ,CIA. LOCATES
JOBS FOR STUDENTS
nlversity Branch Writes to Boards
of Commerce For Information
Regarding Positions.'

IE

nl

Arthur E. Gilman, '14, chairman of
Stunts and features in profusion are the organization for social and indus-

SEMI-FINALS TOMORROW.

HOLD

IS PRELIMINARY

ONE

Sleuthing for jobs to .pass away the
are time of ambitious students this
immer, and for more permanent lo-
tions for graduates, the University
M. C. A. has written Boards of Com-
erce in all of the larger cities in this
d neighboring states for information
to possible positions.
So far, the search has but a prelimi-
ry one, in order to secure publicity
r the request, and to find names of
ncerns who are likely to need men.
)wever, many definite offers of sum-
er as well as more permanent work
ye been received. One is the offer
a position as assistant manager of
West Virginia mining company, open
an engineer.
Further letters will be sent out by
e association to the firms whose ad-
esses have been furnished, and it is
pected that, by this means, many
>re students, than ever before, will
supplied with both vacation and
rmanent jobs.
ERIMAN PROFESSOR WILL
LECTURE HERE ON MONDAY
Professor Felix Kreuger, of the Uni-
rsity of Halle, Germany, will lecture
"Melody in Speech" next Monday at
15 p. m. in the lecture room of the
ysical laboratory. Professor Kreu-
r is one of the university's non-res-
nt lecturers.
escotts to Hear Premananda Das.
Premananda Das, '12P, will talk on
nti-Toxins and Serums" at a meet-

Interest in the wrestling tournament
reached the high water mark yester-
day afternoon, when Doyle, last year's
light-weight champion was dead-lock-
ed by Lewis for 30 minutes, and Morris
won a hotly contested fall from Rei-
mann, making himself eligible for
heavy-weight semi-finals on Saturday.
The draw in the light-weight match
will be settled next .Tuesday, the win-
ner to meet Kendrick in the first semi-
Anal.
No wrestling was done in the 145
pound class because of the defection
of Voorheis who was scheduled to fight
out a previous draw with Tonouchi.
The 158 pound grapplers were given
a rest to collect strength for the semi-
finals to begin tomorrow.
Wrestling bouts have been decided
every Tuesday, Thursday, and Satur-
day afternoon, until now all divisions
except the light-weight are ready for
the semi-finals, and only one match
intervenes in this competition. The
first semi-finals will be held tomorrow
in the wrestling room of the gym.
With all the semi-final matches due to
be settled next week, plans are being
made to hold the final match in each
weight on the main floor of the gym
a week from tomorrow.
BRIDGE PLAYERS TO HOLD
BOARDS AT UNION TONIGHT.
Auction bridge will be featured at
the regular Friday evening card party
tonight at the Union. Five hundred
has been the popular game up to this
time but tonight the bridge enthusiasts
will be given a chance. Two prizes
will be awarded to the winners as us-
ual. The committee in charge of these
affairs is: Berry Ratliff, '13E, chair-
man, Proctor Brown, '13 E, and W. J.
Thienes, '14E.
J Lits Wage Successful Campaign.
Junior lits waged a successful cam-
paign for funds during the first three
days of this week. The class respond-
ed to the appeal, and dues to the
amount of $120 were collected,
Prof. Wilgus Will Not Meet Classes.
Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of the law de-
partment, who has been confined to his
home with an attack of la grippe, will
not be able to meet his classes today
as he had expected.
Senior Laws Hold Dinner at Union.
At the senior law dinner held last
night at the Union, Prof. J. R. Rood
gave a talk on, "Reforms in the Justice
of the Peace Courts." Speeches were
given by members of the class and so-
los were rendered by R. S. Taylor and
H. M. Lautman. About 60 men were

promised for the annual home concert
of the Michigan Glee and Mandolin
clubs, to be given at 8:15 o'clock this
evening in University Hall.
The concert will be largely popular
in nature, and in an effort to attract as
large a crowd as possible to hear the
clubs in their last appearance before
their trip to the Pacific coast, the ad-
mission price has been placed at 25
cents, with a few seats selling for 50
cents.
On the occasion of their recent trip
to Saginaw and Port Huron, the Mus-
ical club men tried out a number of
novelties which will be used on the
western journey. All of these featur-
es, and several new ones worked up
since, will be on'the program tonight.
It is expected that the Midnight Sons'
quartet, which will consecrate its ef-
forts .largely to the anti-classical, will
be the most popular of the new num-
bers. The four men in this aggrega-
tion have been imbibing ragtime fea-
tures for the last week in preparation
for tonight, and their work so far is
said to be of a lively nature.
"Bill" Williams, '14E, is on the pro-
gram for a number entitled simply
"stunts." That Williams can manage
the stunts portion of the entertain-
ment was proved by the hit which his
act made at the recent Junior Hop
performance, and at the concerts on
the last trip through the state.
Tickets for tonight's affair have had
a rapid sale, and it is expected that.
many more will be disposed of today.
Admission cards are on sale at the
bookstores, or may be purchased at the
box office in the main corridor of Uni-
versity hall before the concert this
evening. No seats have been reserved.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS WILL BE
GUEST AT CHICAGO BANQUET.
Annual Dinner of Michigan Alumni to
Be Held in Windy City
on April 1.
President Harry B. Hutchins will be
the guest of honor at the banquet of
the Michigan alumni, of Chicago, to]
be held in that city on April 1. This<
is the annual affair given by the Windyt
City organization and an attendance
of more than 200 is expected.
Prominent Michigan graduates will
also speak, among them, Dr. Robert S.
Woodward, '72E, president of the Car-1
negie Institution in Washington and
Dr. Woods Hutchinson, '84M. Effortst
are being made to obtain Gov. Ferrist
for the occasion.
WOMEN OF SENIOR LIT CLASS
TO DINE AT UNION TOMORROWc

trial work among the workingmen of
Ann Arbor, has spoken three times this
week before factory men.
On Tuesday he addressed the em-
ployees of the Superior Manufacturing
Co., on Wednesday those of the Com-
Packt Co., yesterday those of the Ann
Arbor Machine Co.,'and today he will
speak to the employees of the Newton-
Haggerty Co.
The industrial organization which
will work with all classes of people is
composed of about 40 students, and
was formed after the lecture delivered
here by Mr. F. H. Rindge, a Y. M. C. A.
worker. The society has not yet been
fully organized, but a committee of
five, of which Arthur E. Gilman, '14,
is chairman, has charge of affairs.
William H. Maler, '14, who is direct-
ing the boy scout movement, is en-
deavoring to interest those who are
not members of the three patrols. Nor-
man Laird, '13E, Mortimer A. Clark,
'13E, and Fred W. Hoogsteen, '14, are
in charge of the classes in technical
instruction. Arthur E. Gilman is co-
operating with Elizabeth V. Bodmer,
the visiting nurse of the city, to uplift
the standard of unfortunate families.
The students are making their ap-
proaches to the workingmen through
the assistance of Mr. C. L. Young, the
secretary of the city Y. M. C. A.
Several engineers of the organiza-
tion have volunteered to teach classes
for men handling statipnary engines.
A new law requires these workers to
pass an examination, and it is to aid
these men that the engineers have of-
fered their services.
A meeting will be held in McMillan
hall next week to discuss the various
phases of the work.
STUDENTS GO FAST AFTER
MICHIGAN-CORNELL TICKETS
Upperclassmen and Grads Pour Into
Athletic Office; Distribution
to Continue Today.

Pres. Harry B. Hutchins Will Repre-'
sent Michigan at Meeting in St
Louis, May 1, 2, and 3.
GOT. FERRIS IS ALSO INVITED.
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins will rep-
resent the University of Michigan at
the fourth American Peace congress to
be held in St. Louis, Mo., on May 1, 2
and 3. All of the prominent univer-
sities will be represented by their
presidents. Gov. Ferris has also ac-
cepted the invitation of the executive
committee of the congress. Other gov-
ernors to be present will be Govern-
ors Cruce, of Oklahoma and Stewart,
of Montana.
The American Peace Society, which
is the initiator of the peace congress,
is composed of over 80 peace societies
in the United States and all will send
delegates to the St. Louis meeting. It
is expected that most of the countries
of the western hemisphere, will be
represented at the congress.
TWO TEAMS LOSE BY ONE POINT.
In Women's Basketball, Juniors Down
Seniors; Sophs Win From Fresh.
One point victories were the results
of the first two basketball games the
women played in Barbour gym, when
yesterday afternoon the juniors de-
feated the seniors 5 to 4; and the soph-
omores won from the first year girls
by a 10 to 9 tally.
These games are the first of a series
of three that the contestants will play
for the championship of the upper and
lower classes. The winner of two out
of three of the senior-junior games will
play the winner of two of the soph-
fresh games for the silver cup and
banner offered to the campus cham-
pions. The second games of the series
are to be played next, week.
SOPH ENGINEERS DINE TUESDAY.

. i .x .;"2U = a:s rs n !.:mis
CHAPTER CHOOSES CHINESE
STUDENTS FOR FIRST TIME
Students are Picked Only From First
One Eighth in Reference to
Scholastic Standing.
Tau Beta Pi, the honor society of the
engineering department, announced
yesterday the election of fifteen men
from the junior class to its member-
ship. The selection was based on schol-
arship and personality.
Among the newly elected men are
Hung Yee Tang, of Canton, China, and
Song Hee Waung, of Chinkiang, China.
These two men are the first Chinese
students that have ever been elected
to membership in the local chapter of
Tau Beta Pi.
The following is the list of men who
were selected; the choices were made
from the first one-eighth, in reference
to scholarship, of the junior class:
George Winne Ballentine, civil, Den-
ver, Colo.; Henry James Bill, civil, De-
troit; Joseph Croswell Bogue, chemic-
al, Denver, Colo.; Wihtred Cook, civil,
Saginaw; Harold Osborn Davidson,
B.S.E., Iron Mountain; Francis W. Du-
Bois, civil, Washington, D. C.; Louis C:
Fisk, mechanical, Detroit; Charles W.
Howell, electrical, Lancaster, N. Y.;
George Cornell Paterson, mechanical,
Detroit; Carl Boes Pfeifer, chemical,
Utica, N. Y.; Beauford H. Reeves, civ-
il, Louisville, Ky.; Albert Roth, civil,
Lowell; Chester Seitz Schoepfle, chem-
ical, Sandusky, O.; Hung Yee Tang,
chemical, Canton, China; Song Hee
Waung, mechanical, Chinkiang, China.
J -LAWS, CAPTURE
DISPUTED, GAME
Juniors Win Second Basketball Scrap
From Freshmen Last Night and
End Argument,

FINAL SCORE STANDS 32 TO

Upperclass and graduate students
poured into the office of the athletic
association yesterday to procure tick-
ets for the Michigan-Cornell indoor
meet to be held in Waterman gymnasi-
um March 22.
Although a great many seats were
disposed of, yet many students drew
blanks. This means that there are
many good seats for the meet left for
those who wish to draw lots for them
today.
If any seats remain after 2:00 o'clock
on Saturday, it is possible that those
who have drawn blanks will have an
opportunity to procure tickets. Final
arrangements for disposing of the ex-
tra tickets will not be made until after
today's drawings, owing to the fact
that the entire allotment of tickets
may be given out today.

17.

Women of the senior lit class will
hold the second of a series of lunch-
eons at the Union tomorrow at 12:00
o'clock. Dean Myra B. Jordan and
Mrs. G. L. Jackson will chaperone the
affair. Dancing will follow the lunch-
eon, tickets for which will sell at 50
cents.,
Tickets for the women's banquet to
be given during the last of March may
also be purchased at the same time
for $1.00.

Senior Dents Will Dance Tonight.
For the second time this year, senior
dents will dance at the Packard acad-
emy tonight at 9:00 o'clock. "Ike"
Fischer has charge of the musical pro-
gram. Dr. and Mrs. H. O. Barnes will
chaperone the party.

Dean Cooley, Prof. Willard and Mem-
bers of Class to Speak.
Soph engineers will hold their first
dinner of the year at the Michigan Un-
ion next Tuesday night. Dean Morti-
mer E. Cooley, of the engineering de-
partment, will be the principal speak-
er of the evening. He will be followed
by Prof. H. H. Willard and several
members of the class who will be call-
ed upon for impromptu talks. "Tom-
mie" Hughitt will act as toastmaster.
Tickets, which are selling for 60 cents,
went on sale yesterday and may be ob-
tained from the social committee.
At a meeting of the class yesterday,
"Tommie" Hughitt was chosen general
chairman of the committee which will
have charge of the Soph Prom. ,
Jeffersonians Will Meet Tonight.
A meeting of the Jeffersonian soci-
ety will be held tonight at 7:00 o'clock
in its room in the law building. C. E.
Clement will talk on "Our New Presi-
dent." This number will be followed

In a one sided basketball contest,
the junior law quintet last night out-
tossed the freshmen of that
department by a count of 32
to 17. This makes the sac-
ond time the 1914 men have defeat-
ed the 1915 aggregation this season.
The other game was protested on the
grounds that the first year men were
not notified in time to have their reg-
ular team on the floor.
The freshmen. started out in real
winning style, but the juniors soon
took a brace, and the first period ended
with the long end of an 18 to 10 score
registered to the upperclassmen's
credit. The second half was a walk-
away for the 1914 quintet which al-
lowed their opponents only seven tal-
lies to their 14.
Corey was the big point winner for
the'juniors, the speedy forward caged
the sphere seven times from the field
and took advantage of fouls by the
freshmen for a total of four counts.
Wright and Tower playing the two
guard positions for the winners, were
on the job every minute and made it a
difficult task for the freshmen's for-
wards to get a chance at the net. Be-
sides keeping his man safe at all times
Tower tossed the ball through the
circle four times.
Donelly at forward, and Heuser -at
center for the freshmen, played strong
games. The lengthy center had no
trouble in taking the ball to his for-
wards by clever dribbling and also
was responsible for four points.
The summaries are as follows:
1914 Laws 1815 Laws
Helm.............L.F. ... McClellan
Corey............R.F. .. Donnelly,
Goldstick

MICHIGAN MUSICAL CLUBS'
CONCEn.R

Snivers tsy Ha e, 8:15 P. M
5c No Seats Reserved 500

2

(c

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