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March 02, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-02

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'A

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

I

The

Michigan

Daily

j LOCAL $1.50
MAIL

G 2.00

m

Vol. XXIII, No. 104. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENTS

I ---- --

SALE OFOPERA
TICKETS WILL
BE RESTRICTED
Plan Prevents Monopoly of Coupons
By Small Group of Students
Experienced at
Other Sales.
SLIPS TO BE GIVEN OUT TO
UNION MEMBERS MARCH 15.
General Sale Opens March 24; Thurs-
day Performance Will Be
"Faculty Night."°
In order to prevent a monopolization

I.

Jolly, Jolly, Tars!

THE WEATHER MAN

BRIDGE TOURNAMENT BEGINS
AT UNION WEDNESDAY NIGHT.
Entries for Annual Encounter of Whist
Players dust be in by
Tuesday.

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Sunday,
cloudy with snow and colder; moder-
ate to brisk westerly winds.
University Observatory- Saturday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 21.0; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 28.8;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 15.0; average wind velocity 5
miles per hour; precipitation, .2 inches.
NAVY OFFER ATTRACTS MANY.
Dean Cooley Has Received Numerous
Inquiries About Trip.
More than 30 letters and cards have
been received by Dean M. E. Cooley
inquiring about the offer of the navy
to students for next summer. Inquir-
ies come from students in nearly all
departments.
"The keenest interest is being shown
in the offer" said Dean Cooley," and all
of the letters show much enthusiasm.
In a few more days most of the in-
quiries will be in, and then to show
the navy officials what the sentiment
of the students is in the matter, I am
going to send all of the correspond-
ence to Washington."
WORKING STUDENTS

of the ticket sale for "Contrarie Mary"
on the part of comparatively small
groups of students, the management
of the 1913 Michigan Union opera has
devised a plan by which admission
cards may be more evenly distributed.
According to the new system, slips
will be given out to members of the
Union beginning Saturday, March 15,
and each of these slips, as in the past,
will entitle the holder to purchase six
tickets for any one performance, when
the advance ticket sale for Union mem-
bers opens Friday, March 21. But one
slip will be accepted from any one per-
son, calling for six tickets on any par-
ticular evening.
Formerly members of the Union
could collect a large number of ticket
slips from acquaintances, and secure
six admissions for each slip presented
at the box office. In this way, one
man who was fortunate enough to be far
enough up in the line, could sequester
whole blocks of seats. Under the new
system, one man may only secure six
seats for any single performance, al-
though if he posesses sufficient slips,
he may buy as high as six pasteboards
for every one of the five presentations.
Later Sale Opens March 24.
Tickets for the opera will go on sale
to the general public Monday, March
24, three days preceding the first per-
formance. Last year all of the ad-
mission coupons for the Friday even-
ing and Saturday afternoon shows
were sold entirely out in the advance
Union sale, and it is expected that the
membership requisitions will be equal-
ly as heavy this year.
In former years it has always been
found necessary to give an extra per-
formance on Saturday evening follow-
ing the last show, to meet the inces
sant demand for tickets. This year
the Saturday night show is regularly
scheduled, and tickets for this per-
formance will be put on sale from the
first.
Mail orders for seats for "Contrarie
Mary" will not be filled until after the
general sale commences. Persons
sending in orders for seats on particu-
lar nights will run rather uncertain
chances of being accommodated, as it
is felt by the management to be unfair
to allow outsiders, and individuals who
wish to avoid standing in line, any
precedence over members of the Union
and others, who secure their admis-
sions in the regular manner.
Will Have Faculty Night.
The Thursday evening performance
will be "Faculty Night." Tickets for
this presentation will go on sale to
members of the faculty, who are also
members of the Michigan Union, on
March 19. Each faculty man will be
allowed at this time to purchase as
many as six tickets for this night only.
On other evenings, faculty members
will be expected to procure their tick--
ets in the same way as students.
The music of "Contrarie Mary," in
sheet form and in scores, will go on
sale at 8:30 o'clock, Wednesday even-
ing, March 26, the date of the first
performance. The book of the opera
will not be published this year.

t /

Commencing Wednesday evening, a
bridge tournament extending over
four weeks will be held at the Michi-
gan Union. Entries " for the contest
must be registered at the Union before
Tuesday night, and all games will be
played according to rules prescribed
by the committee in charge. Playing
will begin at 7:30 o'clock each Wed-
nesday evening while the tournament
continues.
The regulations framed for the con-
duct of the tournament stipulate that
only straight auction bridge shall be
played; that four hands shall be play-
ed around at each table; and that no
two couples may play together at more
than one table during theasame even-
ing. No doubling will be allowed, and
rubbers will not count 250.
Kenelm W. Collamore, '13E, will act
as chairman of the committee which
will direct the tournament. Herbert
Wilkins, '14, George Moritz, '15, and
Ralph Conger, '14, are the other mem-
bers of the committee.
HOCKEY PENNANT,~
DECIDED MONDAY
Lit and Science Puck Artists to Fight
For Championship of
Ice Sport.
DOPE FAVORS SCIENTIST TEAM.

.
r
t
i
r
a
t
L

SOPHS SHOWED STRENGTH
EARLIER EVENTS OF

IN
MEET.

Mile Run

Was Most Exciting Event;
Attendance Was
Poor.

Strength in the mile and middle dis-
tances enabled the All-Fresh track as-

SOPH TEAM IS
TROUNCED BY
1916 ATHLETES
By Winning in Mile and Middle Dis.
tances, Fresh Make Clean
Sweep With Score
of 51 1-2 to 29 1-2.

FORMULATE PLANS
Committee Meets Today to Discuss
Union Idea; Have Probed
Conditions.
MASS MEETING MAY BE CALLED.
Plans for the organization of the
projected working students union will
take definite shape this afternoon when
the committee, recently appointed to
work out the idea, will hold its first
meeting. The committee is composed
of R. A. Hess, '13L, M. E. Case, '15E,
and L. D. David, '14L. At this meet-
ing the committee expects to arrange
for the appointment of a larger com-
mittee with about 50 members, each
working in different boarding houses
throughout the city. This committee
will, in turn, call a general mass meet-
ingin the near future, which all work-
ing students will be asked to attend.
Up to the present time the commit-
tee has met with considerable success
i its efforts to arouse interest in a stu-
dent's union. It has investigated con-
ditions in a number of the local board-
ng-houses and this data will be sub-
mitted at the. mass meeting.
Coincident with the investigation of
local conditions, the committee has
learned that at Cornell the authorities
found the boarding-houses to be un-
sanitary, and that through a union of
the students better conditions were se-
cured. The committee believes that a
similar improvement in existing condi-
tions and a shortening of the hours
of work could be accomplished by a
union of the working students.
1913 Lits Should Order Canes Now.
Senior lits who wish to take advan-
tage of the special rates for class can-
es must get their orders in before
Tuesday night. All orders will be tak-
en at the S. L. A. booth where tha
invitations are now on sale. There
will be no special day set aside for the
inauguration of the new custom.
Entries Must be Submitted Today.
Entries for the Hamilton Oratorical
contest must be in the hands of.W. W.
Schroeder, '14, or R. K. Immel, before
6:00 o'clock today The contest will
be held either Monday or Tuesday
night, depending on the number of
men who enter.

DIAMOND PLAYERS
GET FIRST, LESSON
About 50 Aspirants Appeared at Initial
Gathering Yestpyday
Afternoon..

CAST REHEARSES

Hockey league standings:
* * * * * * * *

* * *1

ACT

I

OF OPERA

Preliminary -Work on Curtain Raiser
Practically Completed at
First Meeting.

:
*
*
*
*
*

Team . Won Lost
Science........3 0
Literary ........4 1
Engineer .......2 3
Laws ..........0 5

Pet.
1,000
.800
.400
.000

*
*
*
*
*
*

ACTIVE WORK BEGINS MONDAY. TO ANNOUNCE ROLES THIS WEEK.

* * * * * * * *

* * *

A delegation of about 50 aspiring
ball players met Coach Rickey at Wat-
erman gym yesterday afternoon and
got the first instructions of the 1913
season. No time was lost in the pre-
liminaries and the first general prac-
tice was announced for Monday after-
noon in the cage.
The turnout was large for the first
call and the amount of available ma-
terial makes it apparent that there will
be some tall hustling for berths. Most
of the men who appeared have had ex-
perience on various teams, but the
coach announced that past records er
positions will be overlooked and the
places given only on present perform-
ance so that the old men will have to
uphold their reputations to stick to
the job. The coach also gave a short
talk on training and the spirit that
should be shown on the team, cleverly
illustrating it with big league expe-
rience. Capt. Bell also made a short
talk.
At 1:00 o'clock Monday the big net
will be lowered and the squad will en-
ter on the active work of the season.
Owing to the largeness of the aggrega-
tion it will be divided into two squads
each working an hour, though men are
not barred from endeavoring for the
entire two hours. "Red" Campbell
(Continued on page 4.)

Principals, chorusmen and members
of the orchestra for "Contrarie Mary"
met at the Michigan Union yesterday
morning, and a large part of the pre-
liminary work on act one of the 1913
Union opera was completed. The per-
sonnel of the cast was practically de-
cided upon at this rehearsal, but the
final list of the fortunate tryouts foir
the principal roles will not be made
public until later this week.
The first act will be rounded into
form during the course of the week,
and it is expected that the last act will
be taken up for practice within a few
days. The singing chorus will hold
its next rehearsal tomorrow evening
at 7:00 o'clock, and the cast and danc-
ing choruses, together with the sing-
ing chorus, will be given their next
workout Tuesday evening at 7:00
o'clock.
The showing made by the broiler
chorusmen was especially pleasing to
Director St. John, at yesterday morn-
ing's session. These men have been
perfecting their various steps since
last December,
Journalists Hold Lunch at Union.
Sigma Delta Chi, a journalistic fra-
ternity, lunched at the Union yester-
day. Professor Fred N. Scott spoke on
"Journalism as a Life Work."

Tomorrow the science and lit teams
will battle for the first berth in the
hockey league. The science men are
on the defense, having remained unde-
feated. The lits have gone down un-
der the science's combination once
during the season but the winners of
last year believe that with their team-
work developed they can spoil the per-
fect average tomorrow afternoon.
Dope is in favor of the leaders, but
the literary men have the edge on the
scientists in the number of games they
have played, together with the fact
that the league leaders are made up d
men that have only played together
three times. The lit team has four of
the stick wielders that helped to bring
the flag to that department last season.
When these two teams clash there
will be some real hockey brought to
light. With such men as Bueril, War-
rel, Cohen, and Barnum on the square
at one time there is bound to be some
trouble in carrying the puck any great
distance.
PROF. JAMES R. ANGELL TO
SPEAK ON UNION PROGRAM.
"The Relation of the University to
Its Organizations, particularly Frater-
nities" will be the subject of the ad-
dress to be given by Dean James R.
Angell of the University of Chicago, at
the Michigan Union this .afternoon at
3:00 o'clock. Dean Angell is a son of
President Emeritus James B. Angell.
Selden Dickinson, '13-'15L, and
Chase Sikes,'16E, will furnish the mu-
sical numbers on the program. An at-
tempt is being made to engage mando-
lin club members for next week and
members of the glee club for the fol-
lowing week.

pirants to triumph over their second
year rivals by a score of 51 1-2 to 29
1-2 in the annual dual competition held
last evening in Waterman gymnasium.
The freshmen captured every point in
the mile, half mile and 440, and the 27
points resulting from the clean sweep
of the distance events served to give
the verdants the margin by which they
won.
The sophomores surprised their most
ardent supporters by taking the lead
in the early events, the shot put and
pole vault, and holding their own un-
til the distance runs were staged. The
sophomores came back strongly in the
hurdle events, but with the freshmen
having the better of the argument in
the 35 yard dash and the points evenly
divided in the high jump, the distance
runs proved the undoing of the second
year track men.
Not a sophomore competed in the 440
yard dash and the freshmen naturally
had this event all their own way. In
the half mile the sophomores furnish-
ed some competition but it was not
strenuous enough to prevent the fresh-
men from taking all three places. In-
cidentally it is stated that Murphy,
who won this event, ran his last race
of the season because of ineligibility.
The mile run furnished the best
event of the evening, though the rival-
ry for places was entirely among the
freshmen. Day, who won the event,
came from the rear on the last lap and
a half by a magnificent spurt and won
the event running strongly. Lynch,
who took second, also ran a good race.
The time in this event was 4 minutes
42 1-5 seconds, comparatively the best
time of the meet.
The attendance at the meet was far
below the mark expected. In fact the
lack of interest manifested in the
drawing of tickets for the meet by un-
derclassmen,was again plainly shown,
by the size of the audience of under-
classmen. Little enthusiasm was mani-
fested by the two rival un-
derclasses, until Announcer Quinn
informed the freshmen and
sophomores that cheering for
their respective teams was not barred.
The mile run followed this announce-
ment and the freshmen got up enough
pep to cheer their men roundly and at-
tempt to drown out the- yells of'the
sophomores.
Directly after the meet, the members
of the winning team held a meeting to
elect a captain for the 1916 All-Fresh
track team. The choice of the fresh-
men athletes fell upon H. L. Smith,
who will act as the team leader for
the remainder of the season.
The summaries of last evening's
meet follow:
Final Score-Freshmen 51 1-2, Soph-
omores-29 1-2.
Shot put-Cole (S) first; distance 39
feet 3 inches; Phelps (F) second, 35
feet 1 1-2 inches; Quail (F) third, 34
feet 5 inches.
Thirty-five yard dash-Sulkin, Gore,
H. L. Smith, Monetta, C. B. Smith and
Lyttle (all freshmen) and Hughes and
.~ (Continued on page 4.)

jOre bvtertau Cburch
12:1o-Class for University Men.
President Mackenzie.
Subject: "Sin."
6:30--C. E. Musical Service.
Concluding with a ten minute talk by President Mackenzie.

m

Union Series
7:45 P. M.

Christ and the Church

PRESBYTERIAN

President W. Douglas Mackenzie
OF HARTFORD, CONN.

C H U R C H

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