100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 28, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


c .a

L OCAL $1.60 LOCAL $1.60
MAIL $2.00 MAIL $200
. XXIII N. ITheMichiganY D aily LOCAL $1.0 T
Vol. XXIII, No.'102. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 191. PRICE FIV CENT,

KEEN INTEREST
IS SHOWN IN
NAVY'S OFFER
Opportunity Afforded to Michigan Stu-
dents to Spend Summer on U. S.
Battleships Meets With
Campus Favor.
FACULTY MEN EXPRESS VIEWS
IN COMMENDING THE PLAN.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Friday,
generally clear and colder.
U~niversity Obseryatory-T ursday,
7:00 p. in., temperature 24.0; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 31.0;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 23.6; average wind velocity,
12 miles per hour; precipitation one-
tenth inches.
SENIORS ARE CHOSEN TO
SPEAK IN ORATORY CONTEST
H. E. Goodenow, '13, and E. J. Ros-
enberg, '13, were chosen to represent
the seniors in the University Oi'atori-
cal contest at the class tryouts yester-
day afternoon. These men will com-
pete against the sophomore represen-
tative, and two juniors yet to be select-
ed, for the right of representing Mich-
igan in the Northern Oratorical League
this year. The junior contest will be
held Saturday, and the final contest
March 21.
SHOW NO DESIRE

COACH RICKEY
CALLS POR ALL
CANDIDATES
Baseball Mentor, in Spite of Stormy
Weather, Will Arrive Tomorrow
and Start Proceedings
Immediately.
TRYOUTS TO MEET AT 4:00
TOMORROW AT WATERMAN GYM

Details of Measure Are Not Known
Here; Only General Orders
Are Issued.
The opportunity offered Michigan
students by the United States Naval
department for spending two months
this. summer aboard a battleship is
meeting with universal approval on
the campus. Faculty men and stu-
dents alike commend the plan, and the
keenest interest is being shown.
Yesterday afternoon the postal cards
requested by Dean Cooley from all
who were interested in the matter be-
gan to come in, and by last night there
was a pile of enthusiastic indorsements
of the measure. Many students called
in person upon the dean, and all were
eager for more information.
The exact workings of many featur-
es of the plan are not shown here,
since few details are included in the
general order issued by the Secretary
of the Navy, a copy of which was sent
to Dean Cooley. Furthermore, it is
understood that several features of
the plan have not yet been worked out
by the authorities.k
Students Must be Recommended.
The only reference as to who shall
go is in the following clause: "Stu-
dents recommended by the proper au-
thorities of the institutions where they
are pursuing courses will be embark-
ed in battleships and armoured cruis-
ers in full commission, not more than
20 students to a vessel, for a training
period of about two months duration.
They must have completed two years
or more of their courses and be not
under 18 years of age." There is no-
where in the orders or correspondence
any limitation set on the number of
men who may go from one institution.
As to the instruction given the or-
ders read, "Instructions will be issuedj
later concerning the details of the
courses of training to be given. The1
training will take on at the point
where the second year ends in the av-
erage course. It is intended by this
conference to formulate a system of
instruction that will be of the maxi-
(Continued on page 4.)
HEALTH BILL .IS
DRVAUGHAN'S IDEA1
Senator Armberson Introduces Measure
Originated by Medic Dean
in Senate.K
WOULD REVISE EXISTING LAWS.t

Coach Expects Large Amount of
terial to Report for Team
This Year.

Ma-

4,

TO, ATTEND MEET

cnderclassmen Are Slow in Drawing
Admission Cards For Meet
Tomorrow Night.
CONTINUE TO GIVE OUT TICKETS.
Drawings for seats for the. Fresh-
Soph meet of Saturday evening have1
brought to light a marked lack of in-1
terest in the ranks of the underclasses,
according to a number of upperclass-
men who have been watching the al-
lotment of seats.
.The office of the athletic associationt
was open all day yesterday for the
purpose of distributing tickets for thet
meet to members of the freshmen and1
sophomore classes, who with membersi
of the faculty, are the only ones eli-i
gible to attend the event, and so farI
less than half the tickets have beenN
disposed of. It was only because ity
was thought that underclass interest
would completely fill the gymnasiume
with spectators from the ranks of thet
sophomores and freshmen that juniors,
seniors, and graduates were debarred
from attending the meet.&
Provisions have been made to con-c
tinue the drawings today, and it isv
expected. that a few more of the tick-C
ets will be taken up.t
HEALTH OFFICERS ADJOURNI
AFTER TWO DAYS SESSION.
Municipal control of disease was the
subject of a paper read yesterdayt
morning belore the meeting of thep
health officers from all over the state
who have been in convention here thes
past two days. The talks outlined the.
methods to be followed in coping withp
the foes of public health. In the af-o
ternoon, papers on "The Prevention
and Cure of Tuberculosis" were readt
and, following a general discussion,b
the convention was adjourned.U

With Ann Arbor having its first real
taste of Medicine Hat weather, the in-
consistency of human affairs becomes
apparent in the first general call for
baseball candidates. But according to
the words of some great warrior, "In
time of peace prepare for war," so
are the diamond artists of Rickey pre-
paring tol get out the trusty clubs. To-
morrow afternoon at 4:00 o'clock the
baseball mentor will meet his pupils
for the first time and start the active
work of the practice.
Call Applies to Everybody.
Coach Rickey will arrive here to-
morrow noon and without wasting any
spare minutes will call the squad to-
gether and hand out a few instruc-
tions. The Battery men have already
received a few words but this is the
call for everybody, infield, outfield, or
bleaches. The meeting will be held in
the trophy room at Waterman gym and
the cage will probably be lowered for
work on Monday.
Rickey is anxious that a large num-
ber of candidates appear at the try-
outs as this may be his last year here
and it has always, been his ambition
to turn out a team that will make a
record. The coach contended that
there was a wealth of material in col-
lege that never turned out and that it
is his intention to get every available;
man on the job whether they have had
previous experience or not. Prospects
were really never brighter than this
year but it is a safe guess that many
f the men who are now picked as com-
ers will have to do some tall hustling
to hold their jobs and reputations.
Instructions to be Given Out.
All candidates are expected to be
present tomorrow afternoon at 4:00
o'clock in the trophy room where they
will be addressed by Coach Rickey,
Capt. Bell and others and full instruc-
tions handed out.
WILL ATTEMPT TO UNITE
CLUBS AT MEETING TONIGHT
At a meeting of the Kansas club at
the Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight a
plan will be discussed for the combin-
ing into one club the men from Kan-
sas, Missouri, Texas and Oklahoma.
Although both Missouri and Texas at
present come within the requirements
of the constitution of the Dixie club, it
is thought that there will be no difficul-
ty on this account for these two states
have no separate state clubs. It is
understood that the plan is in favor
with the men from the sun flower
state.
ALUMNI IN PORTO RICO
GIVE BANQUET FOR GRAD
Michigan alumni in Porto Rico re-
cently tendered a banquet to Congress-
man D. E. Anthony, '91L, of Kansas.
Graduates from all parts of the island
attended the affair. Toasts were giv-
en by President del Valle, of the as-
sociation, Dr. Jose C. Barbosa,''80M,
and Dean Frederick K. Fleagle, '07, of
the University of Porto Rico. Michi-
gan songs were sung with old time
enthusiasm.
BAIER EQUALS RECORD OF
CRAIG IN TWO LAP RUN.
"Ted" Baier, quartermiler and can-
didate for the Varsity one mile relay
team, greatly enhanced his chances
of making the team yesterday after-
noon when he turned off two laps o
the running track in 27 2-5 seconds, a
mark which equals that of Ralph
Craig. Baier ran the distance, which
corresponds to a little over 250 yards,

DOPE FAVORS
FRESH TRACK
TEAM TO WIN
Verdant Ones Have Worked Hard i
Preparation for Event and Hare
Entered More Men
Than Sophs.
CONTEST TO BE STAGED AT
GYMNASIUM TOMORROW NIGHI
Entry List is Closed and But One Da
Remains for Underclassmen
to Train.
There is little doubt in the minds of
those who have been watching the
progress of the underclass athletes,
since the floor of Waterman gymnasi-
um was turned over to them for track
work, that the freshmen will win the
annual fresh soph meet tomorrow
night at Waterman gymnasium.
The freshmen have been working
hard in preparation for the meet, and
the entry list shows that there are
more freshmen booked to take part in
the various events than there are soph-
omores. With only one day left in
which to train and with the entry lists
closed, underclass athletes, who, ex-
pect to participate in the competition,
are putting in their final efforts before
the staging of the contest.
Members of the second year class,
state that the small number of
sophomores entered for tomorrow ev-
ening's meet is due rather to a lack of
material in the class than. a laek of
interest, although this statement
sounds a trifle ambiguous to the con-
fident verdants. Sophomores, howev-
er,state that the men they have entered
will be heard from, and are waiting
for the results to show that they are
not lacking in "pep" as might be sup-
posed.
The list of entries follows:
McCabe, R. C. Perkins, V. J. O'Connor;
Freshmen-J. W. Pennie, M. E. Page,
W. H. Pan, S. R. Augspurger, K. Ber-
ray, T. H. Maguire.
Shot put: Sophomores-W. M. Cole,
H. R. Spencer, R. H. Ruedemann;
Freshmen-W. E. Nye, M. E. Page, C.
E. Bastian, F. D. Quail, H. A. Phelps,
Martin Gault.
Thirty-five yard dash: Sophomores-
W. M. Cole, J. E. Hughes, E.S. Cohn,
W. S. Davidson, C. E. Begole; Fresh-
men--C. E. Bastian, S. H. Lyttle, D.
Robinson, Ivan Gore, W. E. Nye, H. L.
Smith, W. H. Pan, S. Monetta, W. E.
Essery, D. T. Rosenthal, C. B. Smith,
S. Shulkin, E. D. Crumpacker, H. Jam-
es, George Bourquin.
Forty yard high hurdles-Sopho-
mores-C. A. McNabb, E. D. Cohn, R.
C. Perkins, E. J. Greene; Freshmen-
W. E. Nye, F. G. Armstrong, George
Bourquin.
Thirty-five yard low hurdles: Soph-
omores-C. A. McNabb, E. D. Cohn, E.
J.. Greene; Freshmen-W. A. Pan, W.
E. Essery, D. T. Rosenthal, F. G. Arm-
strong, S. T. Steen, E. D. Crumpacker,
George. Bourquin.
Four hundred forty yard dash: Soph-
omores-F. A. Kloffer, J. E. Hughes,
E. J. Bushjan, H. H. Hammel; Fresh-
men-S. H. Little, J. E. Darnall, Ivan
Gore, C. Shutes, C. B. Smith, F. G.Pred-
more, George Murphy, J. Hamill, M. H.
Wilkinson, H. James, J. Dillon, Ned
Scott, D. H. Wolfe, W. W. Sanderson.
Pole vault: Sophomores-C. E. Be-
gole, Dascam; Freshmenf-C. Cross, L.
M. Brush, R. A. Nadeau, D. Chatfield.
Eight hundred eighty yard run:

Sophomores-L. F. Terry, J. C. Abbott,
W. Slaght, K. S. Baxter, W. L. McKen-
zie, C. B. Gray, F. A. Kloffer; Fresh-
(Continued on page 4.)
JUNIOR WOMEN WILL HOLD
SECOND LUNCHEON AT UNION
Junior women will hold the second
of a series of three luncheons at the
Michigan Union Saturday noon.
The luncheon will be followed
by music and dancing. Tickets
for this event and the remaining num-
ber of the series on April 26 may be
procured for $1.00 from Phylis Dunn,
Irene Bigalke, Helen Lohman, Julia
Anderson, and Jessie Cameron. Single
admission is 50 cents. -

WILL HOLD FIRST
PRACTICE TONIGHT,
Bert St. John Arrives Today and Will
Conduct Opera Rehearsal
This Evening.

MEMBERS TO GET TOGETHER
FOR ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT
Michigan Union's Second Friday Even-
ing Social Will Feature
Card Party.
Tonight at 7:30 o'clock at the Union,
members will "get together" for the
second of the Friday evening enter-
tainments. The program will consist
of a progressive card party, featuring
.five-hundred, bridge and pinochle.
There will be favors for the winners.
Last Friday night, owing to a number
of other affairs at the Union there was
a lack of room and tables to accommo-
date those who came out. However
tonight there will be plenty of space
for everybody and additional tables
have been provided.
The idea of these Friday night events
is to bring together as many as possi-
ble of the Union members in an in-
formal way. The committee expects
in the near future to provide other
mean's of entertainment for those who
do not play cards. All members are

urged to drop in for
night.

a short time to-

SENIOR LITS
FAVOR RETURN
TO CONFERENCE
After Considerable Debate, Class Votes
By Large Majority to Have Their
Attitude on Question
Recorded.
TAKE ACTION TO LET BOARD
KNOW STUDENT SENTIMENT
Other Business is Transacted at Meet.
ing With Reference to
Commencement.
Resolutions favoring the return of
Michigan to the Western Conference
were passed by the senior lits yester-
day afternoon by a vote of 63 to 10.
The pros and cons of the situation
were debated at length, and a large
majority of the class was in accord
with having their attitude on the ques-
tion recorded. The action was taken
in order that the .board in. control of
athletics will know the sentiment of
the students at its next meeting when
the conference question v ill come up.
A motion to create a sentiment on
the campus for the honor system was
also passed by the class. A commit-
tee was appointed to confer with the
senior classes of the law and engineer-
ing departments in regard to the sys-
tem and consists of Karl Mohr, chair-
man; Russell McNair, Ed Thurston,
Howard Ford and Bernard Fallon.
Select Class Memorial.
A reading desk for the Hill auditori-
um was selected as the class memorial.
It will be a companion piece to the
chair given by the 1912 lits for the
new building. The desk will cost $250
and will be designed by Albert Kahn,
of Detroit.
The class tax was fixed by the fin-,
ance committee as $2.00 and a stand
will be placed in University hall on
Tuesday and Wednesday for the pur-
pose of collecting the dues. At the
same time, orders for the invitations
must be placed and only those who
have paid all their dues will have their
names in the invitations. The price
will be 30 cents and each member of
the class may order as many as he

ANNOUNCE

CAST

TOMORROW.,

Bert St. John, director of the 1913
Michigan Union opera, will arrive in
Ann Arbor at 2:33 this afternoon, and
the first general rehearsal for both
cast and choruses will be held at the
Union this evening.
Mr. St. John has been detained in
New York City on business during the
last few days, and his absence has
made necessary the postponement of
rehearsals for over a week, but begin-
ning this evening practice for "Con-
trarie Mary" will be commenced in
earnest. Tonight's rehearsal will last
from 7:00 to 9:00 o'clock.
With the date of the first presenta-
tion of the 1913 opera less than one
month away, those in charge realize
that only grueling practice can
whip the production into shape in time.
All materials for the speaking roles
and choruses will be picked following
this evening's session and the results
of the competition will be announced
tomorrow.
Some trouble has been experienced
in getting the tryouts for "Contrarie
Mary" to fill out their eligibility cards
The committee in charge announces
that no candidates will be allowed to
continue their work unless the requir-
ed blanks are returned in proper form
by Saturday afternoon, when the sec-
ond general rehearsal will be, held.
Further tryouts for positions in the
orchestra have been called for tomor-
row morning at 9:00 o'clock. At this
time, new men as well as those who
have previously tried out, will be giv-
en a chance to demonstrate their in-
strumental ability.
TO HOLD ELIMINATIONS FOR
PARTS IN JUNIOR'S PLAY.
First eliminations for parts in the
junior girl's play will be held at Bar-
bour gym tomorrow morning at 10:00
o'clock. Several meetings will be nec-
essary before the final cast is chosen
because of the large number of tryouts.
The number of women that have al-
ready reported exceed 150; this is the
largest number of candidates that has
ever reported since the junior play
was inaugurated.
Cercle Francals Holds Annual Party.
More than 100 members and associ-
ate members. of the Cercle . Francais
attended the annual "soiree dansante"
held at Barbour gymnasium last night.
The chaperones at the affair were
Dean and Mrs. J. R. Effinger and Mr.
and Mrs. H. A. Kenyon. "Ike" Fisch-
er's orchestra supplied the music.
Prof. Hildner to Meet Classes Today.
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner of the German
department,,will meet his classes as
usual today. Owing to important bus-
iness he was unable to meet his class-
es yesterday.

A bill, representing some four years Fresh Lits to Dance Tonight.
of research, observation, and study Admissions for the fresh lit dance at
on the part of Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, the Union tonight have sold rapidly;
of the. Medical department, has been there are only 15 left. These will be
introduced into the legislature by disposed of at the Union from 4:00 to
state Senator Verne Amberson, of 5:00 o'clock this afternoon. Dancing
Adrian. will begin promptly at 8:30 o'clock
The bill, which was modeled to in- and continue until 1:00 o'clock. The
corporate Dr. Vaughan's ideas, as chaperones are Mr. and Mrs. M. C.
those of the foremost health authori- Weir and Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Coe.
ty of the state, might be termed a
uniform system. of health protection. Gargoyle to Discuss "Profs."
It is as unique as it is revolutionary "Profs." wilf-'>e the subject to which
in what it seeks to accomplish. The the next issue of the Gargoyle due
plan has been submitted to the great- March 14 will principally devote-itself.
est authorities, on the subject in the The faculty will be treated in all phas-
country and has been pronounced by es, and from the material now in, it is
them to be the very acme of efficiency assured that the number will be a
and practicability. It is conceded that "snappy" one,
with such a law on the statute books,
Michigan would soon become the mod- Prof. Scholl Writes for Paper.
el for health regulating legislation by "Longfellow and Schiller's 'Lied von
all other commonwealths. der Glocke,' " is the title of an article
The plan involves the establishment by Prof. J. W. Scholl, of the German
of a uniform system under the direc- department, in the February number
tion and control of the state board of of "Modern Language Notes." Prof.
health, and means a complete revision Scholl discussed the influence of Schil-
of most of the existing state health ler upon Longfellow, and particularly
laws. . on "The Building of the Ship."

wants.
Make Plans for Senior Reception.
For the senior reception $200 was
allowed and the plan of the committee
in charge is to have it the most demo-
(Continued on page 4.)
STUDENT FRANCHISE
MEASURE PROPOSED
Senator Verdier, '99, Proposes Resolu-
tion to Grant Suffrage to
Michigan Students.
TO BE REPORTED TO HOUSE 800N
As a result of the recent agitation
on the campus intended to secure for
all Michigan students at the universi-
ty, the privilege of casting their vote
in all the general elections, a reso-
lution to amend the constitution of
the state has been introduced into the
senate by Senator Verdier, '99, '01L.
He is on the election committee, to
which the measure has been referred
and, owing to his influence k in that
body, the resolution is expected to be
reported out of committee either today
or tomorrow.
The movement for suffrage for col-
lege students had its inception in
Michigan at a mass meeting held at
the Union in December.. At that time,
the University of Michigan suffrage as-
sociation was formed, and an organis-
ed campaign was instituted to inform
the campus and the members of the
legislature on the value of the meas-
ure. Nearly every college in the state
has taken up the movement and senti-
ment among them is decidedly in fa-
vor of the resolution.
A meeting of the various commit-
tees of the suffrage association will be
held this afternoon in room 207 eco-
nomics building to discuss the details
of the campaign.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan