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February 26, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-02-26

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b)

1.50

'I

The

IAIL $200

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Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

I'

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

XXIII, No. 100.

- -,~--- - -....-.-~-- ---~-- - 1

I

i RENEWS

THE

WEATHER

MAN

CALL FOR 1914
114K.OPERA BOOKS
Committee Decides to Reopen Compe-
tition for ilanuscript for the
Michigan Union 1914
Opera.
ALL CONTRIBUTIONS MUST
BE HANDED IN BY MAY 1.

Reheagrsals For This Year's Opera
Start on Arrival of Bert
St. John.

Willi

As only six contributions were hand-,
ed in as a result of the first call for
books for the 1914 Michigan Union op-
era, another chance will be given cam-
pus playwrights to compete for first
honors. Philip K. Fletcher, '13E, gen-'
eral chairman of the 1913 opera, an-
nounced last evening that May 1 will
be the final date for books to be en-
tered in the competition.
Several of the books handed in at
the union following the first call were
considered meritorious to a degree,
but those in charge feel that there
should be a larger number of offerings
from which to select. It is expected
that several men who wrote books in
this year's competition will submit en-
tries for the 1914 opera. " .
Expect Bert St. John Tomorrow.
No word was redeived here yester-
day from Bert St. John, director of
"Contrarie Mary," but he is, expected
to arrive in Ann Arbor tomorrow. In
that case a general rehearsal will be
called for tomorrow evening, at the
Union, at which time all those who
take part in the show will be given an
opportunity to learn the details of the
production. Eligibility cards must be
filled out by all tryouts at this time,
but as the candidates for positions
have known from the first that they
would not be able to take part should
their work be belpl par, it is not ex-
_ _.,earta many will be eliminated
by this ordeal.
A rehearsal of the orchestra picked
for the opera will be held at the Union
at 9:00 o'clock Saturday morning.
Members of the singing chorus will
meet at the Union this evening at 6:45.
A picture of the committee in charge
of the 1914 production will be taken
at Rentschler's tomorrow noon.
CLASSES FAVOR "SOPH PROM"
Soph Engineers Turn Down Project
for All 1915 Dance.
As far as the soph engineers are
concerned there will be no All-1915
dance this year. At a meeting of the
class yesterday afternoon the question
of changing the usual Soph Prom to
a 1915 dance was discussed from all
sides, and the present method of hold-
ing the dance was thought to be pref-
erable.
At a recent meeting 'of the soph lits
some of the class favored one dance
and some the other, and to settle the
matter satisfactorily for both classes,
the social committee was instructed
to confer with representatives of the
engineers to learn the sentiments of
that class.
At the meeting yesterday the opinion
seemed to be that considering the ac-
tion of the lits, the best plan would
be to declare in favor of the usual
function with the two classes repre-
sented rather than, allow the other
1915 classes to take part.
R. C. Jeter to Run for Class President
Richard C. Jeter's name was omitted
as a candidate for president of the
fresh engineer class. The other can-
didates are Everett Judson, Paul
Wagner, and Horace Corey: The elec-
tion will be. held Wednesday, March
5, the time and place to be announced
later.
Senior Lits to Hold Meeting Tomorrow
* Senior lits will hold an important
meeting tomorrow afternoon at 4:00
o'clock in Tappan Hall. Reports of
various committees will be made and
matters relating to invitations, me-
morial and souvenir will also be dis-

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Wednesday,
snow; slightly warmer.
University Observatory-Tuesday,
7:00 p. m., temperattre, 22:6, maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
28:4, minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 13:;0; average wind veloci-
ty 5 miles per hour.
C. P. CUSHING CONTRIBUTES
ARTICLE TO PAINTED WINDOW
Charles P. Cushing, '07, associate
editor of Collier's, is a contributor to
the "Good Cheer" number of the Paint-
ed Window, which will appear March
10.
"Some Uses of Adversity" is the title
of Mr. GCushing's article, in which are
described the experiences of a free
lance in the magazine world, and
which is illustrated by H. L. Druck-
lieb, of the art staff of Collier's.
Mr. Cushing was the last managing
editor of the Inlander, a student lit-
erary and humorous magazine which
went out of existence in 1907.
PLAY TWO GAMES
OF BASKE T-BALL
'13 Lits and '15 Engineers Are the
Winners in Double-
Header.

While the veterans of the Varsity
track team are not to be slighted in
their training for the indoor season,
this will be the big week for the nov-
ices,-freshmen and sophomores. The
annual Fresh-Soph indoor meet is

Tf
Sc
Li

Hockey league standing:
am Won ..Lost
cience ............3 0
iterary..........3 1

..Pct.
1,000,
.750
.333
.000

Engineer ...........1
Law ...............0

3
3

FRESH-SOPH MEET
STIRS UP RIVALRY
Unde r Trainer Farrell's Direction
Underclassmen Prepare For
Annual Event

ENGINEERS TAKE
GAME FROM LAWS
Boilermakers Win Overtime Hockey
Contest by Score of
5 to 4.

Five and four was the final count in

scheduled for Saturday evening of this the engineer-law hockey game yester-

FE VW S)PlVORES TURN OUT. LITS MEET SCIENTISTS TODAY.

COMMNUN ICATION.
(The Michigan Daily assumes no re-
sponsibility for sentiments express-
ed in communications.)
Editor, Michigan Daily:-
Detroit, Feb. 20.
I note a communication in your is-
sue of last Wednesday excusing the
florid accounts of the so-called riot
precipitated at the J-Hop. Had the
writer's purpose been to arouse the
ire of newspaper. men, and nothing
more, he would have succeeded admir-
ably. I fail, however, to understand
his motive in attributing these exag-
gerations to hasty telephonic corres-
pondence and fabricating state editors.
May I ask of him a pertinent question
or two?
1. Why were the most ridiculous and
disgraceful articles published in the
next evening's papers, and not in the
morning journals?
2. Why did his own paper (and
mine), The Detroit News, print but a
paragraph of sane description of a
more or less immaterial incident?
3. Will he not admit that telephones
are used in preference to telegraph
wires on practically all stories; hence
his excuse a poor one for a particular
(Continued on page 4)
PICK JUNIORS iN
ORATORY TRIALS'
Three Men Win Right to Enter Final
Junior Oratorical
Contest.

MEMBERS WANT ASSURANCE
OF ONE TRIP NEXT FALL.

Committee
Will

of Athletic Association
Also Probe Question
This Wee.

k.ommittee
For

Appointed to Devise Means
Providing Financial
Support For
Musicians.

PLAY TWO GAMES

TONIGHT

Playing on the second leg of the in-
terclass basketball series, the 1913 lits
and 1915 engineers were returned vic-
tors over the 1914 lits and 1916 engi-
neers, respectively, in a double-head-
er staged last evening in Waterman
gym.
In the first game, called promptly at
7:00 o'clock, the senior lits ran far
ahead of the junior five, counting up
23 points to their opponents 11, be-
fore the whistle blew to end the last
half. Spring who starred in last year's
contests showed no deterioration in
form, being the principal basket shoot-
er for his squad. The 14 lits were lax
in covering, and made it easy for the
seniors to get the ball past them. The
inaccuracy of the winners in tossing
the baskets kept the score down, as
they let slip many opportunities to
score.
The second attraction of the evening
resulted in a score of 24 to 16 with the
soph engineers on the heavy end. This
game was hotly contested from start
to finish, but was marked by cleaner
playing and less propensity to rough-
ness than characterized the preceding
fracas. Lack of practice was shown
(Continued on page 4)
SOME TICKETS ARE STILL LEFT.
A Few Pasteboards May be Obtained
At Association Office.
There are still a number of tickets
left for the Varsity and All-Fresh-M.
A. C. track meets, at the office of the
athletic association. Those who have
not procured tickets may get them to-
day. The athletic association has pro-
sided that those who attended the pre-
iminary meet may get tickets for
either of the above mentioned meets
oy showing ticket Number 14 in their
athletic book.
The drawing of seats for the Fresh-
3oph meet, to which only underclass-
nen and members of the faculty are
Aigible for admission, will commence
Thursday morning at 9:00 o'clock. It
_s expected that interest in the annual
underclass indoor competition will
:ause a run on the tickets and it is de-
Aired that those who wish the admit-
Lance pasteboards call for them early.
DR. V. C. VAUGHAN TELLS OF
NEW MEDICAL PROFESSION
At the ninth annual conference of
the American Medical Association,
held in Chicago on Monday, Dr. V. C.
Vaughan, of the medical department,
stated that a new medical profession
was in the process of development.
The new departure will be taken along
sanitary lines and will in time take
the place of medical legislation and
preventive medicine.

COUNCIL WILL
TAKE HAND IN
BAND PROBLEM

week, and the underclassmen are pre-
paring for the event under the direc-
tion of Trainer Steve Farrell.
From the showing made by several
of the first year men in the prelimina-
ry meet of r Saturday evening the
youngsters have a great opportunity to
get the best of their natural rivals.
Armstrong and C. B. Smith look good
for points for the first year men,
while several other verdants have
been showing almost as well. The
freshmen have been working faithfully
since the work in the gymnasium com-
menced and are planning on a victory
Satutday evening.
As far as the sophomores are con-
cerned there seems to be a marked
lack of interest on the part of all but
a 'few men who are eligible for the
second year team. Several of the stars
of the All-Fresh team of last season
are working hard for the coming meet,
but compared with the number of
freshmen working out, the sophomores
are greatly in the minority. An effort
is being made by the sophomores in-
terested in the meet to get the men out
for practice so that a good showing
may be made against the underlings.
The entry lists for the Fresh-Soph
contest are open in Dr. May's office at
Waterman gymnasium, and all under-
classmen desiring to coirpete in the
event are urged to sign at once. The
entries will close at 6:00 o'clock this
evening.
PROF. WENILEY TO SPEAK AT
SOPH LIT DINNER THURSDAY
At the soph lit dinner tomorrow
night at the Union, Prof. R. M. Wenley
will be the principal speaker of the;
evening. He will be followed by "Bill"
Davidson, and "Eddie" Hamm will
preside at the piano. Several other1
musical numbers have also been ar-
ranged. Tickets, selling for 50 cents,,
are going rapidly. The dinner will
be served at 6:00 o'clock.
CAMPUS BEAUTIFICATION
IS TAKEN UP BY COUNCIL.
Communication From Superintendent
Marks States Appropriation Will
be Made,

day afternoon, with the engineers on
the heavy side. This game was a con-
tinuation of the contest which was in-
terrupted by the closing hour during
the first part of the season.
The battle was hard fought through-
out for the teams were both register-
ed beside a zero percentage, and each
fought for the raise. The game was
started at the point where the original
battle was stopped, but at the end of
the regulation halves the count was
four and four, so ten minutes more of
skating was needed before the decision
was rendered to the engineers.
For the boilermakers, Carpenter was
the man who saved the day, for the
sturdy goal' guardian was invincible
against the drives of the laws. Whar-
ton played the most consistent game
for the laws being responsible for
most of the tallies.
Today the literary and science teams
will skate for the honors at 4:00
o'clock. The lits are planning upon
pulling the science aggregation from
first place. If the lits win it will give
them an average percentage of .800
while it will lower the science record
to .750.

WILL

COMPETE

SATURDAY.

PLAN TO

BOOST MICHIGAN.I

Das and Bal Receive Slides to Use in
Their Campaign.
Stereoptican slides depicting scenes
in and about Ann Arbor will be utiliz-
ed by Premananda Das, '12, and Sar-
endora Bal, '1?, of India, in the cam-
paign to boost Michigan which they
are planning to conduct throughout
the principal cities of their native
land.
Das, who will return to India next
month, received a set of 60 colored
slides from President Harry B. Hutch-
ins yesterday, together with a trunk-
load of university catalogues and oth-
er literature which will serve to in-
duce young Hindus in quest of western
culture to come to Michigan.
OFFICERS OF STATE HEALTH
ASSOCIATION MEET TODAY.
ilayor Walz Will Open Program With
An Address of Welcome to
Visitors.
Michigan state health officers will

Percival Blanshard '14, C. C. Lock-
wood, '14, and W. C. Mullendore, '14,
won the right to enter the final junior
oratorical contest,, at the second class
preliminary tryout held last night.
The subjects of the winners were,
respectively, "Christianity and the So-
cial Crisis," Progressivism in Govern-
ment," and "The Degredation of our
National Honor."
These three together with three con-
testants selected Monday evening, will
compete in the final junior contest
Saturday evening, at which time two1
men will be selected for the University
contests.
The sophomore contest, from which
one man will be selected for the uni-
versity contest, will be held tonight
in room B of the law building at 7:30
o'clock. The following are the speak-
ers and their subjects in the order in
which they will appear: C. E. Frank-
lin, '15L, "The Broad Function of the
the Common School;" A. A. Scheerer,
'15, "Philippine Independence;" C.
C. Chang, '15, "The Chinese Republic
and Recognition;" S. J. Rosenstein,
'15L, "America and the Jew;" O. P.
Grant, '15, "The Eight Hour Law for
Women Workers;" and T. H. Hood,
'15, "Armed Peace."
PROF. RIGGS DEPLORES LACK
OF INTEREST IN LECTURES.

In an effort to settle the much moot-
ed band question, the student council
last night appointed a committee to in-
vestigate the announcement of the mnu-
sicians that there would be no con-
certs on the campus this spring and
to effect an arrangement providing
permanent financial support for the
band. The action came as a result of
the declaration of Manager Max Stan-
ley, of the band, that failure of the
'band to reorganize before the close of
this semester may mean no band next
fall.
The committee, consisting of Rolfe
Spinning, '13, D. H. Strickland, '13P,
and H. J. Trum, Jr., '14E, will ascer-
tain the demands of the musicians and
endeavor to settle matters so that the
concerts will not be omitted this
spring. Its report will be presented to
the council at the next meeting of the
student body.
According to Manager Stanley, un-
less matters are arranged satisfactor-
ily so that the bandmen can reorgan-
ize within the next few months, the
rush of other activities next fall may
prevent the musicians from getting
together in time for the football sea-
son. This would mean that there will
be no band music at the football gam-
es.
"By a satisfactory arrangement,"
said Stanley last night," we mean as-
surance that the band will have per-
manent backing of some kind. We
believe that the student body Is willing
to give it to us; it's up to the authori-
ties to decide how.
"One of the reasons for dissatis-
faction on the part of the bandmen is
that they were not given a single trip
during the football season last fall and
one of the conditions of a satisfactory
arrangement will have to include at
least one trip next fall.
"At present the members of the
band do not feel that they are under
any obligations to go to the trouple
and expense of preparing for spring
concerts. Unless some inducement is
offered next fall the men will not reor-
ganize this spring and this may result
in their failure to do so in time for the
football season."
Prof. A. S. Whitney, chairman of the
committee appointed last fall by the
athletic association to investigate the
band question; said last night that a
meeting of the committee would prob-
ably be held within the next fortnight
at which some means will be devised
to give permanent organization to the
band.
Oratorical Association Meets Today.
A meeting of the oratorical associa-
tion will be held this afternoon to pass
upon several amendments to the con-
stitution. These are all of a technical
nature, but none the less necessary.
Other important matters in connec-
tion with the annual play will be act-
ed upon, and a meeting of the board
will be held immediately following the
association meeting, which is called
for 5:00 o'clock in room 302 north
wing.
Hold Annual Cercie Dance Tomorrow.
The annual Cercle Francaise dance
will be held in Barbour gymnasium
tomorrow night. The program will
begin at 8:00 o'clock. "Ike" Fischer's
"Parisian" orchestra has been obtain-
ed to furnish the musical numbers for
the dancing. Prof. and Mrs. J. R. Ef-
finger and Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Kenyon
will act as chaperones. Admission to
the party is by the regular course tick-
et of the society.

Further impetus was given to the hold the second meeting
plan of the senior lit class of beauti- organization into a state

since their
association

Lecture

fying the campus when a communica-
tion from Superintendent of Buildings
and Grounds J. H. Marks was read
before the student council meeting
last night. The letter stated that inE
all probability the board of regents
appropriate several thousand dollars
this spring for the purpose of campus
beautification.
In consequence of the communica-
tion Supt. Marks and Professor Au-
brey Tealdi, of the landscape garden-
ing department will be invited to at-
tend the next meeting of the council
at which time they will present some
plans they have worked out which
will follow the resolution passed by
the 1913 lits.
. After a consideration of minor busi-
ness, the council went into executive
session, for a further consideration
of the hop riot question. No definite
plans have as yet been made public
for dealing with the men implicated
in the affair.
hop Committee Considers Souvenirs.
Several samples of souvenirs for
junior hop committeemen are now be-
ing considered by the sub-committee
appointed at the last general meeting.
The souvenirs, which are purchased
from the hop surplus, will be picked in
a few days.

by Mr. Willard Beahan
Attended by Only 75
Students.

is

today and tomorrow in the west am-
phitheater of the medical building.
The program this afternoon is to be
formally opened by an address of wel-
come by Hon. Wm. Walz, mayor of
Ann Arbor. Three papers in regard
to sanitation and the care of public
health will be read at this time by
members of the association. All pa-
pers are open for general discussion.
Dean V. C. Vaughan will lecture be-
fore the association on the subject of
"Eugenics" at 8:00 o'clock this even-
ing. The address will be followed by
a business session.
The meetings will be continued to-
morrow; one session will be conduct-
ed at 9:00 a. m. and another at 2:00
p. m.
C. J. CONOVER, '11, SPEAKS
TO FORESTRY CLUB TONIGHT
Forest destruction by insects and
fires will be discussed by C. J. Cono-1
ver, '11, before the Forestry club to-
night at 7:30 in room 407 of the engi-
neering building. Since his gradua-
tion Mr. Conover has been employed
as a forest ranger on the Klamath res-
ervation in California. He will illus-
trate his talk with piicares taken by
himself. The lecture will be open to
the general public.

"One of the most surprising things
that I have found since I came to the
university last June," said Prof. Riggs,
head of the civil engineering faculty,
yesterday afternoon, "is the manifest
lack of interest by the students of this
university in their opportunity to hear
the big men of the country, who come
here as lecturers."
As an example of this lack of inter-
est, Prof. Riggs cited a lecture yester-
day afternoon, by Mr. Willard Beahan,
Principal Assistant Engineer of the
Lake 'Shore and Michigan Southern R.
R., who spoke to the members of the
engineering society, on "The Engi-
neering of Men." "Mr. Beahan's lec-
ture, one of the best of the year, was
attended by only 75 or so enigineers,
and yet there are over 1,200 men in
the engineering department.- At M. A.
C., a much smaller institution, Mr.
Beahan delivered a lecture last night,
and over 600 men turned out to hear
him.".
Mr. Beahan's lecture emphasized the
necessity for the engineer to try and
study the men under him, especially
the laborers. "Kindness will take you
a long ways toward the prevention of
strikes," said Mr. Beahan.

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