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February 25, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-02-25

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1;h3 .

LOCAL$1$.5 0
MAL $2.00

The

0ian

Daily

IMAIL $2.00

XXIii, No. 99.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY, 25, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

WORKING MEN
IN UNIVERSITY
TO FORM UNION
Students Putting Themselves Through
College Want Shorter Hours,
Better Pay, and Cleaner
Environments.
COMMITTEE IS FORMED TO
TAKE CHARGE OF' CAMPAIGN
Boarding House Help Claim That Long
Waiting List Keeps Wages
at Minimum.
Condemning existing conditions un-
der which-university men are compell-
ed to work in Ann Arbor boarding
houses for an average wage ranging
from seven to nine cents per hour,
working students have inaugurated an
active campaign aiming towards the
organization of a union which will en-
deavor to obtain shorter hours, higher
pay and more sanitary environment for
the workers.
The committee in charge of the cam-
paign, consisting of Robert A. Hess,r
'13L, Melvin E. Case, '15E, and Louis
D. David, '14L, is planning to circular-
ize, the 1,000 working students in the
university within the next fortnight
and to call a mass meeting for public
discussion of the question.
The movement is the outcome of a
general discussion at a recent meeting
of the Intercollegiate Socialist society
at which several working students re-
counted ,their personal experiences in
the boarding houses. At the close of
the discussion the society refused to
undertake the campaign to organize
the working students and a self-ap-
pointed comimttee was formed to car-
ry out the work.
"Student Workers Eat What's Left"
"We find that students are compelled
to work two and one-half hours for a
single meal worth 20 cents," declared
Robert A. Hess, chairman of the com-,
mittee, last night. "In many instances
they are compelled to eat what's left
and usually this isn't much. For this
work hired girls are paid $4.00 a week
and board, whereas figures show that
the rate actually paid to students is
seven to nine cents an hour.
"The cause for this is the fact that
there are such long lists of students
ready to work under any conditions be-
cause they are unable to make organiz-
ed demands. If a student does not
work hard enough to suit the board-
ing house keeper or growls about what
he gets, he is fired peremptorily. A
call to the labor bureaus usually brings
half a dozen applicants for his posi-

e

1.

THE WEATHER MAN

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Cloudy and
unsettled, probably snow tonight or
Wednesday. Colder; moderate nor-
therly winds.
University Observatory - Monday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 14.8; maximum
temperature, 24 hours preceding, 18.5;
minimum temperature, 24 hours pre-
ceding, 5.0; average wind velocity, 5
miles per hour.
MICHIGAN HEALTH OFFICERS
TO CONVENE HERE TOMORROW
Papers on Public Sanitation Will Be
Discussed Before Big Medical
Gathering.
Health officers from the entire state
will come to this city tomorrow for
the second meeting of the Michigan
Health Officers' association. The ses-
sion will cover a space of two days and
will include four. different programs
and discussions. At least 250 are ex-
pected to be present.
The address of welcome is to be giv-
en by the Hon. William Walz,mayor of
Ann Arbor. Three papers will be read
and discussed at the first session, re-
lating to sanitation and public health
service.
Dr. V. C. Vaughan will lecture to the
members of the association tomorrow
evening at 8:00 o'clock on "Eugenics."
Following this address, the association
will conduct its regular business ses-
sion.
On Thursday morning at 9:00 o'clock,
three papers will be given which relate
to the municipal control of disease. At
the final meeting to be held the same
afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, two papers
in regard to tuberculosis and its rela-
tion to public health will be read.
Dr. Vaughan Returns From Hyde Trial
Dr. V. C. Vaughan, of the medical
department, will return from Kansas
City tomorrow in time to lecture be-
fore the health officers' meeting. He
has been testifying in the Hyde mur-.
der trial in that city.
ARRIVAL OF BERT
ST1JOHN DELAYED
First General Rehearsal of "Contrarie
Mary" Postponed by Non-ArrivaL.
of Opera Director.
ENTIRE CAST NOT YET CHOSEN.
Bert St. John, director of the Mich-
igan Union opera, will not arrive in
Ann Arbor today, as was expected.

HOME CONCERT
.ANNOUNCED BY
Stud eInts Will Have Chance of Hearing,
Varsiy Al r and String
Ar~sin IUniversity
Iaall March 7.
MEN WELL RECEIVED BY PORT
HURON AND SAGINAW ALUMTNI.

LIBRARY

WILL

NEW WING FOR

BE REQUESTED
Librarian Koch Recognizes Xecesity
of Providing More Stock
Room for Increasing
Supply of Books.
SHELF ROOM SPACE WOULD
BE DOUBLED BY ADDITION.
Other Improvements Including Better
Desk Facilities May Also
be Made.
An addition which will require an
appropriation of $50,000 is proposed by
university authorities for the general
library to relieve the present congested

Manager Reports First Week-End
of Year Was Made Without
Financial Loss

Trip

According to an announcement made
yesterday, the Michigan Glee and Man-
dolin clubs will give their annual home
concert Friday evening, March 7, in

University Hall. This will be the only conditions caused by the increasing

opportunity during the year for the
entire student body to hear the Varsity
warblers and string-artists in action,
and inasmuch as the clubs are ac-
knowledged to be much above the av-
erage this season, it is expected that,
the attendance vill be large. The us-
ual combined concert with the Wom-
en's Glee club will be held late. in the
spring, as usual.
Members of the Glee and Mandolin
clubs, 48 strong, returned from Sagi-
naw Sunday morning. The concert giv-
ex in that city Saturday night was not
an entire success financially, but the
college musicians were heartily wel-
comed by the 300 persons who attend-
ed the affair. The Port Huron concert,
given the preceding evening, was the
big society event of the season in
Michigan alumni circles in that city,
and the local theater was almost sold
out for the occasion. Malcolm Mc-
Cormick, '15, manager of the clubs,
announced last evening that although
the trip was not especially profitable
from the box-office point of view, no
money had been lost by the clubs.
Following the concert in Port Huron,
the men from Ann Arbor were enter-
tained at a dance at the Elks' club hall,
after which a midnight luncheon was
served.
On May 2 and 3, the Michigan clubs
will give concerts at Detroit and To-
ledo. The matter of a western trip
for the mnsicians has not been definite-
ly decided, owing to the reticence of
western alumni in regard to guaran-
teeing funds for the long trip. It is
expected that a final decision as to
whether the clubs will make the Pa-
cific tour will be reached the latter
part of this week.
Committees Named for Oratorical Play
Committees have been appointed to
take charge of the oratorical associa-
tion annual play, "The Fan," which
will be given March 7. The general
committee consists of the following:
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, the director,
chairman, Arthur G. Andrews, '13, Ray
K. Immel, and Earl Black, '11-'14L.
The chairmen of the sub-committees
are: Earl Black, costumes and tick-
ets; Paul Blanshard, '14, programs; L.
H. Dunten, '14, advertising; R. K. Im-
mel, preperties; Karl Mohr, '13-'15L,
invitations; C. E. Phillips, '14L, ush-
ers; and W. W. Schroeder, '14, pub-
licity.

number of new books. The probable
location of such a wing would be south
of the main buildinlg, west of, and par-
allel to the stacks.
Librarian Theodore W. Koch yester-
day gave a summary of the present
conditions showing that the proposed
addition or a similar one is possible.
The library at present contains 315,-
000 volumes. The size -has exactly
doubled in the last 11 years and is con-
tinually growing. Books to the num-
ber of 17,500 are received each year,
making an average increase of over
45 volumes per day. This flood of
books necessitates 2,187 feet of new
shelving per year.
The addition if built will be similar
to the present stack wing and will be
only a short distance west, leaving two
wings in the plans connected in the
center by a shaft. The new structure
would be of the same height and ca-
pacity as the present one.
OtheAT imPprovements to the building
are planned, including greater facili-
ties for desk service which is now in-
adequate especially just before and af-
ter classes. It is probable, however,
that the addition in stack capacity will
be given precedence over any other
improvements requiring a large ap-
propriation.

TICKETS FOR TRACK EVENTS
WILL BE GIVEN OUT TODAY.
All Students and Faculty Members
May Have Pasteboards on
Application.
Tickets for the Varsity and M. A. C.-
All fresh indoor track meets may be
obtained at the athletic office today and
tomorrow from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m.
As was announced at the prelimina-
ry meet on last Saturday night, many
of the tickets for the two remaining
meets, which are open to the student
body as a-whole, remain to be given
out to members of the association. Any
student or faculty member may draw
again for the two remaining events
upon presentation of coupon, number
14, not detached from the yellow book,
until the supply of tickets is exhausted.
Tickets for the fresh-soph meet,
which is open to freshmen, sophomores
and members of the faculty exclusive-
ly, will be ready for drawing the lat-
ter part of this"week. The names of
all members of the association have
been indexed according to class. By
means of this index, admission cards
can be given out rapidly and only to
those who are entitled to them. Every
student who wishes a ticket for any
meet must present his yellow coupon
book:
VARSITY STAR RETURNS FOR
SECOND SEMESTER'S WORK.
Grover Herrington, varsity football
star during the seasons of 1910 and
1911, has returned to school to com-
plete his course in the dentistry depart-
ment. Herrington was obliged to leave
college last spring on account of the
illness of his sister, who died shortly
after his departure from the universi-
ty. As he needs only the dne semester
to secure his diploma in Dentistry,
Herrington will of course be unable to
try again for a berth on the Michigan
eleven, a fact much to be regretted
by Michigan gridiron fans, in as much
as the Spokane player, up to the time
when he sustained a broken ankle in
the fall of 1910, was considered one of
the most promising of the Wolverine
pigskin artists.
DR. BOHN SPEAKS
ON LABOR REFORM
Socialist Sees Hope of International'
Brotherhood in Uprising of
Unskilled.
FIRST STEP TAKEN BY MINERS.
In his lecture last night -on "The Up-
rising of the Unskilled," Dr. Frank
Bohn emphasized the fact that 50,000
American miners in the Illinois coal
fields had resolved to strike in case of
a foreign war.
"This action marks a new epoch in.
American history," the speaker said.
"It shows'that the laborer has begun
to realize that international brother-
hood is a bigger and grander thing1
than national selfishness, and that he
is willing to sacrifice his job, the one1
thing that provides him with a liveli-
hood, in order to realize that brother-
hood.
"The philosophy of life preached in
"The Sermon on the Mount" has never
had a fair chance. Today it is regard-
ed by many as a failure. And why
did it fail? Merely because it was'
left to gain a footing in a world where
one man is exploited for the benefit of
another. When industry is managed
on a democratic basis and each work-
er receives the full product of his toil,

then the words of the Nazarene will be
read again and understood, and being
understood, those grand teachings
will become a practicable possibility."
STUDENT COUNCIL TO HOLD
REGULAR MEETING TONIGHT
The regular meeting of the student
council will be held this evening at
7:00 o'clock in the oratorical rooms.
Business concerning the J Hop riot
may be considered at this session'
which will probably be open but most
of the evening will be devoted to rou-9
tine business which has acumulatedi
during the probing of the Hop dis-
turbance. The band concert question
may alsn h bronht un.

STUDENTS WITH
LOW STANDINGS
ARE DISMISSED
Faculty Orders 39 to Withdraw From
Literary Department Because
of. Poor Work; Many
Are Warned.
ONLY 25 WERE SENT HOME
AT END OF LAST SEMESTER
Perfect Grades Received by 12"Grinds,"
Six of Whom Are Freshmen
in University.
Because of unsatisfactory records
made in last semester's work 39 stu-
dents were dismissed from the liter-
ary department at a meeting of the
faculty last night. Last year only 25
were asked to withdraw on account of
poor work. The number of warned
students this semester is considerably
larger than that of last year while the
list of probationers will be about the
same.
The faculty also recommended to the
board of regents that the combined
six year literary-medical course be ex-
tended to all students entering the lit-
erary department on or before Septem-
ber 1913.
The 11 students down in their work
who left the university before the ad-
ministrative board's action and who
were not dismissed, will not be allow-
ed to reenter the university without
special permission. The degree of
A.B. was recommended to be granted
to 13 students and the B.S. degree to
five.
Twelve students, six of whom are
freshmen, have completed the semes-
ter's work with A's in every subject.
Last year 13 came through with clean
slates.,
CHINESE MEN PETITION TAFT.
Students' Magazine Wants Recognition
of Republic by President.
A remarkable feature of the Febru-
ary number of the Chinese Students'
monthly paper which has just made its
appearance, is a letter sent by the
Chinese Students' alliance represent-
ing some 900 students in this country
to Pres. Taft asking for the immediate
recognition of the Chinese Republic.
Among other contributions are "The
Demand of the Hour" by T. F. Hwang,
'14L, and "Commercial Opportunities
of China" by P. Y. Lo, '14E.
A hope has been expressed by W. A.
Chung, assistant director of the Chin-
ese Educational mission, that a num-
ber of young Chinese women will be
sent to the United States to be educat-
ed in the near future. -
"RED" CAMPBELL WILL GIVE
TALK TO BATTERY TRYOUTS.
A meeting of the battery candidates
for the 1913 Varsity baseball team is
called for 7:30 o'clock this evening in
the trophy room of Waterman gymna-
sium. "Red" Campbell, former Varsity
pitcher, who will coach the twirlers
and receivers, will address the men
who are battery aspirants as a starter
for his coaching work which he will
take up the latter portion of the week.
TOASTMASTER, PROPHET AND
POET NAMED BY ENGINEERS.
At a meeting of the senior engineer
class yesterday, "Ed" Howell was

elected class prophet. The oratorical
honors were divided between "Jinx"
Otto, who was chosen toastmaster,
and Frank Gibbs, who was elected
class orator. After a thorough searoh
among those present for someone who
could write a "Pome," H. B. Pickering
was selected as class poet.
PRELIMINARY 'CONTEST IS
HELD BY JUNIOR ORATORS
L. S. Hulbert, '14L, J. W. Harding,
'14L, and L. D. David, '14L, won the
right to compete in the semi-final jun-
ior contest by winning the first prelim-
test last night. W. W. Schroeder, '14,
was named as alternate. The second
I en+tF+ willha hPuld in rnn R of+ho

MEXICAN

PVOPHECIES

PEACE.I

-eshmen because of their ignor-;
of conditions suffer more than
s by this system.j
course, there are exceptions,
as the place at which I am now
>yed. Unfortunately there are
any other places like it."
Dr. Bohn Favors Movement.
campaign to organize the labor-
tudents last night met with the"
siastic approval of Dr. Frank
the socialist lecturer.
minimum wage rate of 25 cents
>ur or its equivalent, should be
lished among working university
nts," he declared. "No student
I be allowed to work more than
ours a day. A longer period will
ere seriously with his university
and health."
KTISTS AND LITS ARE
VICTORS IN HOCKEY GAMES.
eltists and lits were the victors
.ouble header on the hockey rink
vening. The scientists won from
,ws 9 to 1, while the lits took in
ngineers by a 2 to 1 count. To-
e engineers will play off a post-
game with the laws.
. HUTCHINS TO SPEAK
IN SAGINAW AND DETROIT.
s. H. B. Hutchins will speak on
Relation of the University to
gan Business" before a luncheon

Word was received here yesterday that
Mr. St. John had been called east, and
would be unable to reach here before
Thursday. As a result, the date of the
first general rehearsal has been post-
poned and final' selections for all parts
in the opera will not be made until
the last of the week.
The 32 men who showed up most
auspiciously in the tryouts for places
in the singing chorus, held last week,
met at the Union last evening for their
first rehearsal. Prof. William Howland,
of the School of Music, drilled the can-
didates in several of the numbers on
the score, and all those present were
given printed copies of the entire list
of musical numbers. The singing cho-
rus will hold its second rehearsal to-
morrow evening at 6:45 o'clock at the
Union. Rehearsals for men in the
broiler and medium dancing choruses
will be held at 6:45 this evening at the
Union.
The selection of students to fill the
leading roles in "Contrarie Mary" has
been tentaively made, but the cast will
not. be definitely announced until af-
ter Director St. John has approved the
men named in the preliminary tryouts.
Nearly all of those picked so far are
men recognized on the campus as good
vocalists, and a number are members
of the Glee club. One tryout who was
a star in last year's production, will
probably be unable to take part on ac-
count of the condition of his studies,
Contracts for the music, scenery and
properties for the 1913 production
were-awarded to the Whitney Scenery
Co., of Detroit, yesterday. This firm
haidled the contracts of this nature for

Student Says Madero's Death Will
Mark End of War.
"Things are turning out just as I ex-
pected," said Pres. J A. Martinez, of
the Latin-American club yesterday.
"The death of Ex-Pres. Madero will
mark the beginning of peace in Mexi-
co."
According to Pres. Martinez, the ex-
president did not feel his responsibili-
ties keenly enough. He was really un-
fit for the presidency, as he had had
no experience in the political field, and
proved to be a mere tool of his min-
isters, whom he appointed without
careful consideration.
While the object of the revolt has
been to overthrow the ex-ruler and to
deprive him of his power, the acciden-
tal -death of -Madero will be of gener-
al benefit to the country as a whole,
because through his wealth and power
he would have again endangered the
nation in seeking re-election.

Charms Of Cupid Overcome Love For
Learning And Elopement Is Final Result
Love took a fall out of Art and Ambi- registering gazed for the first time into
tion last Wednesday when Jesse Little- the eyes of pretty Dorothy who just
had entered the school of music. From
field, a junior lit of Freeport, Ill., and that moment Littlefield forsook his
Dorothy W. Fowler, a school of music cherished ambitions of emulating
student of Springville, N. Y., journeyed Blackstone and Webster while she
to Windsor, Canada, in the morning banished all dreams of surpassing Tet-
and returned several hours later, unit- razini.
ed in the holy bonds of wedlock. The romance moved along rapidly
The next morning, while his frater- but its early culmination was a com-
nity brothers at the Alpha Tau Omega plete surprise even to those who were
housp were still in the land of dreams, "on the inside."
the newly ordained benedict packed What the respective "papas" of the
his grip and, leaving a note for his actors in the romance think of their
roommate, Carl Schoeffel, '13, made his performance seems to be a matter of
way to the depot where his bride was little concern to the newlyweds. Lit-
awaiting him and together the two tlefield informed his friends that he
boarded a train for Chicago. was going to Chicago to look for a job.
Littlefield is 20 years old and the However, it is said that he was never
new Mrs. Littlefield is 19. The groom short of the long green and that his
came here last fall from the University allowance as a student was sufficient
nf Wis;-orin and enveral. weer after tn iinnnrt a helnmet onmfortably.

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