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February 19, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-02-19

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VOCAL $1.50
MAIL ,$2.40

I

The

Michigan

Daily

I LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

I

Vol. XXIII, No. 94. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1913. PRICE FIVE CEN

"SQUIB" TORBET
TO WITHDRAW
FROM COLLEGE

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Unsettled
weather, snow or rain in southern por-
tion, warmer.
University Observatory-Tuesday,
7:00 p. m. temperature 31.2; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 36.2;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 18.0; average wind velocity
11 miles per hour.
ADVERSE ACTION ON TANGO
PASSED BY PAN HELLENIC.
Inter-Sorority Organization Makes
Fourth Body to Oppose
Extreme Dances.

Michigan Footballt
Stax End; Was
1esuit of
Gdrat

to Lose Services of
Discouraged at
Semester

LAWS PREPARE
WA SHINTONS
BIRTHDAY PLANS
Judge Charles S. Cutting, of the Pro.
bate Court of Cook County, Ill.,
Will Make Principal
Address.
EXERCISES TO BE HELD IN
UNIVERSITY HALL SATURDAY
Many Famous Men Have Spoken at;
These Memorials Since Their In-
ception, 40 Years Ago.
Washington's birthday will be ob-

REINSTATEMENT
OF HOP WILL
BE ATTEMPTED
Combined Committees for 1914 F#ne-
tion Discuss Faculty Edict at
Meeting Held Yester-
day Afternoon.
WILL ASCERTAIN EXPLICIT
NATURE OF FACULTY CHARGES
Hop Balance Will Amount to $175;
Committee Will Decide on Sou-
venirs Soon.
Immediate reinstatement of the jun-

BECAME PROFICIENT FORWARD
r,.siad u61DNt. 191 SEASON.
Toybet's Friends gay His Eligibility
you a rrooakuy ot Have
been Ait e.
Once again Michigan athletics will
be aUlecceo by the withdrawal from
couige of a tootball man of star cal-
iLer. itoy E. Torbet, '14, of Detroit,
na. 6i6mniiea. his intention of quitting
tie university, and if he persists in
is intention, the 1913 football team
wi pose thle services of a valuable

exponent of the gridiron game.
Discouragement at the results o
the past semester's scholastic endeav
ors was the reason assigned by Torbe
for leaving the University, but his
friends state that his work is in such
condition that his eligibility would
not be affected if he did a little bet
ter than average next semester.
Torbet left the university for hi
home in Detroit yesterday for the pur
pose of talking over the matter with
his parents. He returned late last
evening for the purpose of making
final preparations to leave after hav
ing obtained his parents consent.
Torbet has served for two years on
the Michigan Varsity football team and
won his "M" both years. He~.had one
more year left to play. During his
career on the Michigan team Torbet
played at the positions of half back
and end. He filled both positions ac-
ceptably. During the latter part of
the 1912 season, .Torbet became pro-
ficient in forward passing under Coach
Yost and proved especially valuable
to the team in this line.
During Torbet's freshman year he
captained the 1914 All-Fresh foot-ball
team.

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-
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Panhellenic, the inter-sorority or-
ganization, at its meeting yesterday
afternoon went on record as the fourth
distinct body to order the tango's de-
parture. Several of the women ex-
pressed viems all of which were more
or less coincident, stating that the un-
popularity of the dance on the campus
at present, made it objectionable to the.
body as a whole, and despite any views
that a few individuals might entertain
in regard to the matter, it would be
best to support the action taken by the
Women's League in the matter. This
was put in the form of a motion and
received the enthusiastic support of all
present.
The Michigan Union, the lit classes,
the Women's League and Panhellenic
now compose an organized front that
will probably tend to -remove objec-
tionable dances from all student func-
tions in the future.
REGENTS CONDUCTj
MINORBUSINESS
Hold Longest Single Session in His.
- tory in Effort to Play Joke on,.
President Hutchins.
BOARD GRANTS MANY DEGREES.

served by memorial services as has ior hop will be attempted by the com-

COMMMUNICATIO N.
(The Daily assumes no responsibilit3
for sentiments expressed in com
munications.)
Editor, Michigan Daily:-
A recent communication in your ra-
per called attention to' the exaggerated
newspaper stories that appeared in the
columns of the state and nation press
after the recent J Hop disturbance. A'
present a part of the news that goes
to outside papers is handled by student
correspondents and in fairness tC
them, as well as to the other corres-
pondents, it seems only justice that
the public should know how the story
of the hop fracas came to be distorted
in the state press.
When the disturbance occurred,
none of the telegraph offices were op-
en and it was necessary for the corres-
pondents to telephone the facts into
their papers in order for them to ap-
pear the next morning. This wasdone
by at least all of the representatives
of Detroit newspapers. At that time,
little was known of the real nature' of
the trouble. The worst features of the
affair stood out most prominently.
However, the correspondents were
not influenced by this. If the stories,
which were branded outrageous, and
which certainly were not conserva-
tive, are examined carefully it will be
seen that the real facts are true. The
stories were colored by the men who
wrote them from the facts that had
been telephoned. For this the local
correspondents cannot be held respon-
sible. The matter was entirely with-
out their province.
LOREN T. ROBINSON, '13.
INDOOR SEASON
OPENS SATURDAY

been the custom for the past 40 years.
The services will be held in University
Hall, Saturday, afternoon at 2:30
o'clock. The principal address will be
delivered by Judge Charles S. Cutting
of the probate court of Cook county,
Ill. J. J. Kennedy, president of the
senior law class will preside. As usu-
al the exercises will be in charge of
the law department. A block of seats
will be reserved and the faculty and
students will attend in a body. The
program follows:
"The Yellow and the Blue;" two
violin solos by Marian Struble; ad-
dress by Judge Charles S. Cutting,
"America."
The three law classes will form
front of the law building and ma to
University Hall. They will ""seated
first, but facult member and other
classes will be comm ated. A large
crowd is anticisated nd the balance
of the seating c p ty will be opened
to the general p ic.
This custom of celebrating Washing-
son's birthday has been inseparably
connected with the university since its
inauguration in 1860. With the ex-
ception of a few years, February 22
has always been observed by appropri-
ate exercises. At the first meeting
the principal speaker was Pres. Hen-
ry P. Tappan. Among those who have
spoken at past meetings are Ex-Pres-
ident Grover Cleveland, William Jen-
nings Bryan, and Chief Justice Charles
H. Hughes. In 1911 President Emeri-
tus James B. Angell delivered the
principal address.

bined hop committees of the 1914 class.
At a meeting of the committees at the
Alpha Delta Phi house yesterday af-
ternoon the faculty edict abolishing
the hop was discussed from various
angles. A special executive commit-
tee composed of sub-committee heads
and the general chairman was in-
structed to investigate the matter at
once in an attempt to effect a'rein-
statement of the annual dance.
The committee will consult with the
faculty and the exact charges brought
against the hop will be ascertained.
The committee will then attempt to co-
operate with the faculty in a rein-
statement. In taking this action the
committee will continue in office until
a conclusion to the matter is reached.
In previous years the organization has
been discontinued directly after the
hop.

A committee was also appointed to
investigate the matter of souvenirs for
committeemen. The souvenirs are
purchased from the balance of hop re-
ceipts. In contrast to the $400 balance
of last year the committees this year
have a balance of about $175. The in-
creased expense of this year's event
was due chiefly to the higher price
paid for catering services.
COLUMBIAN ORGAN TO START'
- FOR NEW HOME TOMORROW.

t
s

LAWS MEET TO
DISCUSS NEW
MARKING PLAN
Nearly 150 Representatives of Legal
Department Convene at Union
Yesterday Showing Discon-
tent at Recent Grades.
PETITION FACULTY TO GO
BACK TO FORMER SYSTEM
Laws Have Precedent in Action of Last
Year's Senior Civil
Engineers.
Near to 150 students from the three
classes of the law department, met at
the Union yesterday afternoon, for the
purpose of discussing the new mark-

Participants
Meet Are
of

in Preliminary Track
Announced; Plenty
Competition.

ENTER CHARGE OF DISORDERLY
CONDUCT AGAINST STUDENTS.'
Three Men Arrested in Connection
With Huron Club Probe Will Be
in Court Friday.
Prosecutor George Burke indicated
last night that the cases of the three
students, who were arrested Saturday
night in connection with the Huron
club probe, will probably be called in
Justice Doty's court Friday. A charge
of disorderly conduct has been enter-
ed against them.
An affiidavit was obtained from one
of them yesterday. It states he was
furnished liquor at the club after mid-
night. This will be used as evidence
against the organization.

CS OBSERVE

The board of regents "put one over"
on President Hutchins in that record
breaking session of Monday night. The
meeting was scheduled to last from
7:30 to 11:00 o'clock with another ses-
sion Tuesday morning but early Mon-
day night the members of the board
got together and resolved not to ad-
journ until the president showed signs
of quitting. But President Hutchins
was game and did not weaken, conse-
quently the longest session in the his-
tory of the board was recorded when
the members filed out of the regents
room at 1:45 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing.
Only business of a minor nature was
transacted. Gifts to the equipment of
the civil engineering department were
accepted from the Americah Sewer
Pipe Company, Pacific Flush Tank
Company, Herbert Fisher, Taunton,
Mass., and IV. F. Robinson, of Buffalo.
W. H. Hamilton was appointed to
take the place of Prof. David Friday
during the summer session in the eco-
nomics department. Miriam O. Wood
was made women's physical trainer for
the summer and M. R. Ellis, dean of
women at the biological station.
Regent Comstock, who was recently
appointed by Gov. Ferris to take the
place caused by the death of Regent
Grant, took his seat. In view of his
coming the following committees were
arranged: engineering department,
Regents Hubbard and Comstock; law,
Regents Bulkley and Clements; libra-
ry, museum and Memorial hall, Re-
gents Comstock and Bulkley.
A payment of $1,500 was authorized
on account of Albert Kahn for archi-
tect's service and superintendence of
Hill auditorium.
Provision was made for a new assist-
ant in the oratory department by an
appropriation of $200 on account of
90 additional students. Theophile
Raphael was appointed as assistant in
sociology.
A request was received from the
Michigan State Embalmers association
for the establishment of a course in
embalming in the summer session. The
request was referred to the medical
and executive committees for consid-
eration.
The action of the university senate
in advocating a convocation of all uni-

Lectures on Spanish Architecture.
W. C. Titcomb gave his illustrated
lecture on "Spanish Architecture" be-
fore the Ann Arbor Art Association
last night.
The lecture was the second number
of the current course on "Spain," the
next number of which will be given
February 25 by Professor Herbert R.
Cross of the university.
AlUMNI IN CHICAGO FOUND
TWO $300 SCHOLARSHIPS.

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Graduates Wish to Interest
School Students in
U. of M.

High

Work of Installing Famous Instrument
in Auditorium Will Take
Two Months.
The work of removing the Columbi-
an organ from University Hall to Hill
Auditorium will commence Thursday.
It is estimated that 100 trips with or-
dinary wagons will be required to
transport the mechanism across the
campus. Two months are allowed for
the complete installation of the organ,
as. many parts will be shipped to the
factory for 're airs, and certai aits.
will be replace with new erial
When the qu stion of sical equip-
ment for the a ditor' first came up,
it was thought h an entirely new in-
strument would be installed; but in-
vestigation showed that the Columbian
organ was suitable for all purposes,
if certain additions and improvements
were made.
This instrument was first built in
Festival Hall at the Columbian Exposi-
tion, and at the time was the most per-
fect and largest pipe organ in the
world. It was then removed to Cin-
cinnati, and a year after the exposition
was presented to the university by the

VARSITY "N" MEN CANNOT ENTER
Entries for the preliminary in Wat-
erman gym Saturday evening, were
closed yesterday. This meet is for the
purpose of giving the trainer a line on
the possibilities of the material, and,
as the "M" men are known quantities
they are barred from Saturday's com-
petition. The first events will be run
off promptly starting at 8:00 o'clock.
It will be in this meet that the track
fans will have their first chance to
see the much touted freshmen in ac-
tion. It will also provide Farrell with
his first glimpse at his protegees per-
forming in public competition.
The entries follow:
Thirty-five yard dash-J. E. Bond,
H. Seward, S. Monnett, H. E. Brown,
F. R. Manahan, H. L. Smith, L. A.
Baier, C. H. Sherff, C. S. White, J. E.
Hughes, D. H. Cohn, E. S. Cohn, S. H.
Lyttle, W. E. Essery, W. E. Nye, C. E.
Begole, S. Shulkin, M. Bergeman, C.
Smith, D. S. Kendall, E. D. Warner,
C. T. Smith, F. Cady, R. Ripleger.
Mile run-W. I. Allen, H. E. Brown,
W. H. Lynch, J. C. Abbott, H. C. Carv-
er, W. McKenzie, C. M. Smith, F. L.
Young, L. F. Terry, S. M. Davis, H. T.
Cummins, G. B. Gray, R. W. Husey, M.
M. Day, W. A. Richards, M. I. Brad-
ner, G. B. Fox, W. H. Davidson, L. M.
Johns, C. A. Wagner. -
High jump-H. E. Brown, I. W. Ber-
nie, W. H. White, J. B. Catlett, G. B.
McCabe, E. J. Green, T. H. McGuire,
V. O'Conor, R. C. Perkins, M. E. Page.
Forty yard high hurdles-F. G. Arm-
strong, J. B. Catlett, E. S. Cohn, F.
Klopfer, E. J. Green, W. E. Nye, Crum-
packer, C. A. McNobb.
440 yard dash-J.J Hamill, T. A.
Baier, H. C. Cowe, J. B. Catlett, E. Bus-
jahn, E. D. Wame, C. B. Smith, G. Mur-
phy, P. Jansen, N. N. Scott, J. R. Dar-
nall, R. Nadeau, S.'H. Lyttle, C. B.
Smith.
Pole vault-J. B. Catlett, M. Cook, D.
Chatfield, E. Daskern, I. Van Kammen,
C. Cross.
Shot put-H. M. Cole, J. Spencer,
M. H. Galt, W. E. Nye, M. Pontius, C.
Quinn, H. Smith.
Half mile-H. E. Brown, J. C. Ab-
bott, W. W. Slaght, W. McKenzie, F.
A. Klopfer, E. Busjahn, E. D. Warner,
G. Murphy, P. Jansen, J. S. Leonard,
A. C. Martens, G. B. Fox, I. Thomas,
R. A. Runyan, T. Shaffer, A. Rosenz-
weig, J. Dillon, R. Nadeau, F. L. Wal-

ing system in operation this year for
the first time, and following speeches
from many of the students present, in-
cluding honor men, petitioning resolu-
tions of protest against the system
were drawn up and are now in circu-
lation. The petition follows:
"We, the three classes of the law de-
partment, in lawful body assembled, do
petition the fac ty of tha epart-
ment; that the prsent sy em of grad-
ing be abolished until uch time as a
better system b ma gurated, the stu-
dents of said d pa ment meantime to
be retro-activel raded under the old
system.
"We are of the opinion as students
of the University of Michigan and its
law department that the present sys.
tem is unjust, inequitable, and inade-
quate.
"And we, the signers of this respect-
ful petition, are composed not only of
those, who have felt the burden of.
the new grading system,,but there are
among us many of those 'who received
the highest grades, and the standard
of many as students is unimpeachable.
"And we do hereby most solemnly
resolve; that these resolutions are
presented not in the spirit of revolt,
and we are actuated by the belief in
the fairness and the knowledge that
we are exercising our vested rights,
without malice, disrespect or preju-
dice of any kind toward any person or
body."
Rumors of a meeting were current
Monday morning and afternoon, at
which time the grades were given out,
and announcements calling for the
same were placed on the bulletin
boards Monday night.
The new system in the law depart-
ment is somewhat different from that
in the other departments. Oi the fo4g
grades given, A is for exceptional
work, B is good, C is passing if no
more than four hours of C credit are
received a se ter, and D is not-pass-
.ed. The chief grounds of complaint,
laid down at the meeting yesterday
were that the standard has been rais-
ed too high and the passing grades
placed within too narrow limits.
This is not the first time that stu-
dents have taken this method of voic-
ing discontent at grading results.' Just
a year ago, the senior engineers drew
up petitions submitting to the faculty
their dissatisfaction at the marks giv-
en out in Civil Engineering 2 and 3.
"KEEP OFF LAW

FOUNDING TODAY!

cises Will Commemorate
Anniversary of Departments
Establishment.

63rd

PROMINENT PHYSICIANS PRESENT
Founder's Day will be celebrated in
the medical department today. The
exercises will commemorate the 63rd
anniversary. of the founding of that
department in this university. The
speakers of the day will be Drs. Abra-
ham Jacobi, of New York City, and
Willett Herrington, of Bad Axe. Dr.
Jacobi, who is president of the Amer-
ican Medical association, will speak at
10:00 a. In. in the west amphitheater'
of the medical building and at 8:00 p.
m. in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Dr.
Herrington will deliver the Founder's
Day address at 4:00 o'clock in the af-
ternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.

As the result of a recommendation
made to the Alumni association of Chi-
cago and adopted by its board of di-
rectors, two new scholarships, having
a value of $300 each annually, will be.
started on the campus next year, and
will be open only to graduates of the
Chicago high schools.
The object of establishing the schol-
arships is fourfold: first, to send to the
university the best type of boys; sec-
ond, .to give the Chicago association
another interest in the university;
third, to influence the boys in the Chi-
cago high schools to go to Michigan;
fourth, to assist in preserving the cos-
mopolitan nature of the university pat-
ronage.
Prof. Reighard Is Called to Chicago.
Prof. J. E. Reighard of the zoologic-
al department has been called to Chi-
cago. He is expected to return in
time to meet his classes today.
Dean Vaughan Testifies at Trial.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the med-
ical department, has gone to Kansas
City, where he will testify in the Hyde
muria tig

University Musical society.
SOPH LITS PLAN DINNER TO
BE HELD THURSDAY, FEB. 27.
Soph lits will hold the third of their
regular dinners a week from Thurs-
day at the Union. President Ander-
son will preside and an endeavor will
be made to secure a prominent mem-
ber of the faculty to speak. Tickets
are now on sale by members of the
committee.
Junior Women Will Hold Tryouts
Tryouts for the junior women's play
will be held 'tomorrow afternoon in
Barbour gym at 4:00 o'clock. All
women of the junior classare urged to
report as the play offers opportunity
for a variety of characters. The play
is a romance set in an imaginary land.
Prof. H. A. Kenyon, of the engineering
faculty, is to coach the play during the
rehearsals.

SAY SENIOR LITS
Class Wants to Stop Trespassing on
The Grass; Would Stimulate
Pride in Campus.
PRES. DICKINSON IS INSTALLED.
Action toward beautifying the cam-
pus lawns was taken by the senior
lits yesterday afternoon. The class
went on record as opposed to needless
trespassing on the university campus,
which in the past has caused it to be
in a disgraceful condition. The stu-
dent council was asked to consider
the matter and to create a sentiment
among the student body against th(
usual appearance of the campus lawns.
The following resolution was passed
by the class:

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