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February 12, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MAIL $2.50

The

i i nDakly

i

I

LOCAL $2.00

.1h.di

MAIL $2.50

U

88.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIG AN, \,-AY FEIAY 12, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C

P

TED

COUNCIL

Temper-
e to

Body Inquiry.
REW BRICKS AND
D RAM ARE SOUGHT.

Offenders Inde-I

)ver to Faculty
of a lengthy executive
p with an investigation
nece during the J hop
-ymnasium last Friday
t Hancock of the stu-
1 ed a special executive
body for tonight. The
;ee appointed to probe'
I today continue its
ing evidence regarding
and will report the re-
estigation at tonight's

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Wednes-
day, fair with a cold wave; lowest
temperature will be about 10 degrees;
brisk northwesterly winds.
University Observatory-Tuesday,
7:00 p. m., temperature, 14.6; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
33.4; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 14.4; average wind velocity
16 miles per hour.
JUNIOR CLASSES DINE TONIGHT.
Lits to Join Boiler Maker Cohorts in
Big Dinner.
Junior lits will dine with third year
engineers tonight at the Michigan Un-
ion at 6:00 o'clock. The joint affair
will take the place of the regular se_
ries dinners given by each class. Mem-
bers of both the lit and engineering
faculty will be present. The faculty
men will give short talks as well as
representative members of each class.
Regular series tickets will give ad-
mittance to the affair. Others r-ay pro-
cure cards for the single dinner. A.
second combined function of the two
classes will be a Junior Jamboree to
be held in March.
PROF. AND MRS. NELSON GIVE
"AT HOME" FOR CHINESE >CL I B1
Wit, merriment, music, and refresh-
ments were the features of the "at
home" given by Professor and Mrs.
J. Raleigh Nelson of the engineering
department in honor of the 69 mem-
bers of the Chinese Students club and
their friends. Over 140 attended the
affair, including some 50 members of
the faculty and their wives.
AMISSON T

FLASH 0.S. U. RETURN MESSAGE

F(0NT IAIME ARY" TRYOUTS
111S T HATE CLEA1R RECORDS.

Creetings from Michigan to Ohiol
State Ui.e.rsity traversed the heavens
last night on ether waves when the
University wireless station sent the
following message, written by Presi-
dent Harry :B. 1-utchins:
"Pres. W. O. Thompson,
Ohio State University,
Columbus, Ohio.
"The heartiest of greetings and
good wishes to President Thomp-,
son, the faculty and student body
of Ohio State University.
"By wireless from the President,
faculties and students of the Uni-
versity of Michigan."
The message was a reply to one re-
ceived from the Ohio school Monday
night as the culmination of several un-
successful attempts to establish wire-
less communication between the;

schools.
It was Innetl to send several news
items last night but just after the
president's message had been received
at Ohio State the receiving instru-
ments stOpped working. At a late hour
last night communication had not been
reopened but it is expected that this
erening a regular news letter will be
flashed between the stations. If this is
successful, Purdue, North Dakota,
Wisconsin and M A. C. may also be
relayed into the circuit, thus forming
Operator N. 13. Burgland recently re-
an intercollegiate news service.
turned from Cleveland, where he re-
ceived his first grade federal license
ihe district commissioner, which is ef-
fective for two years, and gives him
the right to send and reeiv messages
in any part of the country.

UNI

Selections for Parts Will be Made
Meeting at the Union
Tonight.

at

DEATH TAKES
ENGINEERING

ION DINNERIST"RA A DIDATE
H E D '1 r nFrT i L
SE TOMORROW lF E 1 4 u AL W R K
3akang I.iForut to Secure Judge 4-o S a- Yt Been Forced to
Day of Toledo to Act as Drop lis Be misc
L L L."ti1" k¢ i__ea'._

w1re

-xult-stillaster,

of Exams.

DiISP'OSE OF M'ANY

rric~ iis EIESI~i N ~It}X REAL CASS

At the time of the tryouts for places
in thq 1913 Michigan Union opera cast
and chorus, to be held in the next two
weeks, all candidates will be required
to fill out eligibility cards, and have
them returned to the committee in ac-
ceptable form. Two years ago, one-
half of the men trying out for "The
Crimson Chest" were eliminated from
the competition on account of the
condition of their studies, but it is ex-
pected that no similar difficulty will be
experienced this spring, because all of
the tryouts have understood from the
first that they would be unable to take
part should they fall by the wayside in
their school work.
All aspirants for speaking and sing-
ing roles in the opera will meet at the
Union at 8:00 o'clock this evening, at
which time they will be asked to recite
the parts tentatively assigned to them
before Christmas. Following the try-
out, at which pert St. John, director,
of the production, and Prof. William
Howland, musical director will
act as judges, definite selections
of men to fill the various roles will be
made. These will be announced in a
short time, and the men picked will be
yet to work in earnest to perfect their
parts.
The book for the opera, is now in the
hands of the printer, and the first cop-
ies will be ready for the use of the
Thespians some time next week. It is
probable that "Contrarie Mary" will be
put on sale in book form, as was "The'
Awakened Rameses" last year.
AiSSOCIATION
,Y
SELECTS' CASTt
FOR "TH FAN"1
Oratorical Body Chooses Players Who
Are to Present one of Soldoni's
Masterpieces .
Soon
AUT iOR WAS ONE OF MOST
PROLIFIC OF DRAMATISTS.

wrarily. halted its
day to await the
cil's probe. Pres-
questioned last
ss of the faculty
t he had nothing

INSTRUCT

that a large
own to have
en submitted
by university
of the deans
consider any

Eforts are being made to secure
Judge William Day, of Toledo, to act
as the principal speaker at the Michi-
gan Union membership dinner tomnor-
row evening. Karl' S. Mohr, '13,
chairman of arrangements, has written
to Judge Day, who was the speaker
at the big football mass meeting two
years ago, but as yet has received no'
reply.
Prof. Clarence Denison, of the en-
gineering department, will act as
toastmaster, and the faculty will be
represented among the speakers by
Mr. W, H. Hamilton, of the economics
department. Other faculty mci will
also take part in the after-din-

All tei stars of trackdoi and the
numerous lesser lights presented
themselves to the attention of Trainer
Farrell during yesterday afternoon.
1p to this time the work of getting in-
to sa h 11)rogrsse1 in a dilatory
fashio, but iony three wceeks in-
'tercnik beforea the reliminarymeet,
the rackmenrealze hat he ime is
none too long to enable them to show
up well, and are humping themselves
accordingly. As far as is known none
of the track candidates will be
lost through failure to pass examina-
tions. Trainer Farrell's worries are
Such lessened in this respect and he
is no longer looking for a set-back
from failure in the school work.
M1any Freshnm Report.

Acting Asst. Prof. John Schmutz, of
the Surveying Department,
Falls a Victim to
Pneumonia.
HEAD OF DEPARTMENT SPEAKS
HIGHLY OF LATE ASSISTANT,
Born and Educated in Switzerland, Mr.
Schmutz Has Been on Fac-
ulty Since 1908.
Professor John Schmutz, of the sur-
veying department, died at his home
at noon yesterday. His death was due
to pneumonia, and was an unexpected
blow to his family, for althougll he has
been ill for some time, his condition
until today was never regarded as
being at all serious.
John Schmutz was born January 25,
1863, at Bern, Switzerland, he received
ed his early education in a 'gymnasi-
um' in Bern. While still a young man
he came to this country. In 1894 he
became inspector in the United States
Engineer's offices, in Detroit and Du-
luth, a position he held until 1902. In
1900 he also became draftsman on the
St. Clair Flats survey, a position which
he held until 1904, when he became'
draftsman with the Lake Superior
Power company, Sault Ste. Marie,
Michigan. 1"omi1905 to 1907, he was
draftsm f in the U. S. Engineer's of-
fice, uisville, Ky. He came to the
Uni rsity in 1908 as an instructor in
s veying, a, position he has held until
is promotion. last spring as Acting
Asst. Professor of Surveying. He was
a member of the Woodmen of the
World, and the local Masonic lodge.
In speaking of the death of his as-
sistant,' Prof. C. T. Johnson, head of
the surveying department, yesterday
afternoon said, "I cannot speak too
highly of John Schmutz. He was faith-
ful and excellent worker. We could
hardly keep him from work when sick.
I believe he was the most faithful con-
scientious man I ever knew. His was
a splendid character."
Funeral services will be held from
his home at 2:00 o'clock tomorrow af-
ternoon.
1913 ANNUAL HAS
BR1AND'NEW IDEAS

ted

INDOOR MEETS

suspects investigated
he engineering depart-
rs are literary or law
>rities of the law de-
ght refused to say how
livolved were enroll-
ment and whether any
e carpet." The deans
>meopathic and dental
fiared that none of
were among the sus-
:ial committee of the
ed on page 4.)
EES LOSE -

'-

' HOME

Field so

J

be Used.
OPENING

CONTEST.

s are up -in arms again.
v rinks at Ferry field will
hape to stage the winter'
s season. On account of
nage system of the athlet-
fined with the unfavorable
ditions it has been found,
o get an icy' surface that,
the pucksters to compete.
gineer game which was
>r tonight has been post-
le date will be announced
Ihletic authorities are try-
e arrangements to use,
ink to skate off the sched-
s. This rink was used last
e hockey games and was
tory to the skaters. This
ndition of the ice is good
the weather, so the puck
I have the use of a first
fight in for the campusf
n if the rink can be se-

STIL _PUZZLES
Authorities Would Solve Difficulty by
Charging Nominal Admis-
sion, Proceeds to Ap-
ply on Band Trip.
STUDENT COUNCIL TURNS
DOWN THIS PROi A'IWmON.
Many Object to This Plan on Ground
That Many Students Would be
Barred From Meet.
The problem of arranging the ques-1
tion of admission to the indoor track
meets which gave a great amount of
trouble to the student council and the
athletic association before the semes-
ter examination recess, is still far
from a satisfactory settlement. The
question was taken up at the meeting
of the student council last evening
when a representative of the athletic
association went before that body with
the plan suggested by the athletic au-u
thorities, but while the athletic author-
ities. are said to stand ready to adopt
any feasible plan, it is understood that
there are many difficulties still stand-
ing in the way of a satisfactory ad-
justment.
Karl B. Matthews presented the plan
of the athletic association as a repre-
sentative of the board in control. The
plan of the associaton in brief called
for the charging of a nominal admis-
sion of probably a quarter for each
meet. The association then offered to
turn over the net proceeds of the meet,
amounting last year to something like
$800, to the university band, not, how-
ever, making the net proceeds of the
indoor season the whole of its obliga-
tion to the band.
The student council, however, turn-
ed down this proposition, believing that
a plan wherein no admission was t9
be charged would be more satisfactory
to all concerned. The plan of the
council calls for the limiting of the
Cornell meet to juniors and seniors,
the fresh-soph meet to underclassmen,
and throwing the other meets open to
the entire student body. The plan also
calls for the reserving of a section for
alumni, who are to be charged an ad-

ner program, and topice of general
campus interest will be discussed. It is
probable that the recent rioting in con-
nection with the Junior hop will
come up for comment.
Harold McGee, '13E, and Edwin
Thurston, '13-'15L, will be the student
speakers on the program, and it is ex-
pected that Capt. Inman Sealby, '12L,
will be present and speak. A number
of selections will be given by the Var-
sity quartet.
Tickets for tomorrow evening's din-
ner are selling at a lively rate, and
from present appearances the entire
block of admission cards will be dis-
posed of before the affair. Only a lim-
ted number will be sold, and as the
uembership dinners so far this year
lave without exception had a capacity
attendance, it is probable that there
mill be few empty seats for the Febru-
axy function.
(AN.)E CLUB PROJECT
1)ISCUSSEID BY CO3DMIT TEE

More freshmen than ever were on
hand yesterday to report to the trainer
and, from the knowledge that can be
obtained from "prep" school statistics,
it would appear that the class of 1916
is much richer in track material of the
first water than their immediate prede-
cessors on the campus. To this class
must be looked for a supply of hurd-
lers to fill the now existing gap in the
hurdles, If Craig does not get into
shape in thc. hurdles it will be a lean
year for Michigan in the dual meets
and in the inter-coilegiates. If the
freshman eligibility rule were laid off
the team would not only be strength-
Eed in the hurdling, but also in the
.polevault where good men are sadly
n ceded.
Speculation is rife at this time as to
whet(er Michigan will be represented
by a four mile relay team at Pennsyl-
vania relay races on Franklin field,
April 26. Smith is making good time
in the mile, and Haimbaugh when
shifted to this distance can perform
very creditably, but it will be difficult
to select the two others to complete the
quartet. A possible solution for this
di-ficulty would be to look to the half-
milers to develop wind and staying
pow er in sufficient quantity to fill in.
'But ini the midst of all this doubt and
uncertainty one thing looms up as a
strong probability, and that is that
Micilgan will be ably represented in
the mile relay with the available quar-
ter-milers that are now in training.
S~aiucl C. Par1ks, '9,Visits University
Samuel C. Parks, 91, mayor of Salt
Lake City, Utah, was in the city yes-
ierday visiting the university. While
iii college he took an active part in
an pus activities and since graduation
has been in public life in Utah.
BE t EFMi ER LEAVES TO

A a meeting yeterday afternoon of
the committee appointed by the Mich-
iga. Union to consider the advisabili-
ty o organizing a student canoe club,
the natter was discussed and plans
laid Cor the careful consideration of
the poposition. The men were divid-
ed ino two groups, one of which will
proced to communicate with other
collegs where similar clubs are main-
tained while the second group will
probe tudent sentiment on the idea,
and fi. 'what purlpose a canoe club
may fifill.
WILL EATURE 511E ShOWS
AT COUNTRY FAIR FOR WO3AEN
Among 'ie Exhibits Will be a "Baby
She", a Missing Link" and
a Police Station,
Side,N-sws will be featured at the
county faklgiven by the women of the
university f Barbour gym Friday af-
ternoon. baby show including chil-
dren up t3the age of four years, a
freak sho n which the "missing link"
will be s5wn, and a fully equipped
police stlon to care for delinquents
will greet he eyes of the fair dancers.
One of the ost peculiar novelties will
be a quaf medicine booth where la-
dies actin as fair "mongers" \Will sell'
cures for am blues.

Date is Not Definitely Settled But Play
Will Probably be Presented
March7.
Practice for "The Fan," the orator-
ical association play, began yesterday
with the announcement of the cast
for the annual production. Regular
practice will continue until the date
of presentation, which is not yet def-
initely decided. The tentative date is
March 7, and the play will probably
be staged in University Hall.
Carlo Goldoni, the author of "The
Fan," was was one of the most prolific
writers of drama of his day, producing
between 160 and 170 manuscripts. This
play was selected for its particular fit-
ness for student presentation.
The cast which has been selected is
as follows; Evaristo, . xd, erson,
'15; Count of Rocco Marina, C C. Har-
bison, '14; Baron del Cedro, D. C. John-
son, '14L; Crespino, E. M. Wisdom,
'13; Timoteo, P. O. Bailey, '13; Mor-
acchio, J. J. Reighard, '13; Teresa, El-
sie Seitz, '14; Scavezzo, William anaf-
roth, '14; Grannina, Mildred Guilford,
'13; Gertrude, Madeline Bird, '13; Can-
dida, Amanda Strom, '13; Susanna,
Gladys I. Stowell, '13; Coronati, W. R.
Melton, '13; Limoncino, Elmer Riebel,
'13.
HAMILTON CONTEST MAY BE
REORGANIZED BY THE BOARD
The oratorical board will meet today
at 5:00 o'clock in the bratory room to
consider the reorganization of the
Hamilton Oratorical contest. This
competition is under the direction of
the Hamilton Club, of Chicago, which
gave the contests for several years.
Five of the larger western uni-
versities formerly competed, and
it is hoped that the contest may again
be established. Testimonials amount-
ing to $200.00 are offered.

Michiganensian Will be Divided Into
Five Sections, Featured by
New Cuts.
IS DEDICATED TO PROF. SMALLEY
Under the direction of the editors
and their assistants the 1913 Michigan-
ensian is rapidly taking form, and
promises many new attractions in the
way of a year book. Chief among the
original ideas will be that of having
the book divided into five sections,
each being exclusively devoted to a
special feature of the university life.
These will be headed:'The University,
Thd Classes, Athletics, The Campus,
and Organizations. Each will be in-
troduced by a heavy colored insert,
bearing an appropriate design in three
colors.
The University section, consisting of
about 14 pages, will contain pictures of
Michigan's buildings and surrounding
scenes. This is an entirely new fea-
ture, and will be a material addition to
the book. Much of the second section
will be devoted to the seniors, nine
pictures of whom will appear on a pen-
el with one panel to a page. Most of
the copy for the Organization section
is in the hands of the editors, and al-
ready the greater part of the pictures.
have gone to the engraver. All those
who have not handed in their copy are
requested to do so before the 20th,
since this is the final date upon which
*it will be received. Seniors are warn-
ed for the last time, because no sit-
tings can be arranged for at the pho-
tographers after the 16th. Unlike for-
mer years, the new book will show
(Continued on page 4.)

had every pos-'
ime in forming
ie weather has
ith the plans,
delayed prac-
heir failure to
that everything
adiness to start

AE -ABDRESS AT CHAMPAGN
Dean mitingcr of the literary depart-
mcnt left last night for Champaign,
Il, to attend the dedication of Lin-
coln hall, at the University of Illinois
which will be held this afternoon. He
will be guest of honor at a banquet
of Michigan alumni at Qhlampaign to-
morrow night.,
In the meantime Registrar Hall is
conducting the offIce of the dean who
will return Saturday.

could probably be
on page 4.)

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