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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The

$2.50

Michigan

Daily

L~o"al$2.00
flail $2.50

.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JJANUARY 26, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

TED MEN TO
EET IN HONOR
)F EDEMEYER

L H E WEATHER MAN

A 1913 David and Goliath

THE

3IHHIOAN DAILY WILL
PUBLISH "J HOP" EDITION.

i

eul Services Eulogizing
ate o--ressman Will Be
Helda i4 o iversity Hall
This .ifternoon.
APICAL SKiETCH TO

the

BE IYEN BY F. A. STIVERS
s Expected that $10,000 Can Be
Rai:ed for -0he Proposed
Scholarship Fund.
enorial servic-s in honor of the
Congressman William W. Wede-
cr will be held in University Hall
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The
'e hall will be open to the public
pt the two center sections, which
be reserved for those organiza-
s of which Congressman Wede-
er was a member. The exercises
be presided over by President
y B. Hutchins or in the event that
ils to return in time, by President
ritus James B. Angell.
te invocation will be given by the
S. A. John and a biographical
ch by Frank A. Stivers,'95-'97L, a
smate of Mr. Wedemeyer, will fol
Addresses will be given by Dean,
ry M. Bates, the Hon. Franz C.

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Warmer
with moderate southerly winds.
University Observatory--- Saturday,
7:00 p. 'm., temperature, 35.0; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
37.8; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 24.6; average wind veloci-
ty, 8 miles per hour.
Women's League to twive Favor Dance.
Tickets for the post-exam favor
dance to be given by the athletic com-
mittee of the Women's League in Bar-
bour gym the evening of February
11 are limited to 100. All women are
urged to secure their admission slips
before the end of this week as a suffi-
cient number of favors must be or-
dered in advance. Invitations to the
party will be given by the women who
will also act as escorts. Five favor
dances are to be featured. The tickets
are 50 cents per couple.
Chinese Students Will Hear Dr. Fitch.,
Dr. AlbertParker Fitch of Andover
Seminary, Harvard university will dis-
cuss the seventh of the series of re-
ligious questions prepared by the Chi-
nese Students' club in McMillan hall
this noon.
Bishop McDowell Will Preach.
Bishop William F. McDowell, of Chi-
cago, will deliver an address on "A
Near View of the Far East" at the ev-
ening services of the Methodist church
today. _ _
FIRE SYSTEM IS
DELAYED BY PUMP
Connections With Naval Tank Iade
Last Week; Insid Details
Nearly Completed.
WORK TO BE DONE THIS MONTH.
Work on the completion of the fire
protection system which is being in-
stalled at present, has been delayed
by the non-arrival of one of the two
pumps, which are to be the means of
forcing the water tnrough the pipes.
One of the pumps was received over a
week ago, and has been set up. It is
probable that all of the inside work
will be completed within ten days, and
the second pump can be set up in a
short time after it arrives. Connec-
tions with the 'naval tank were made
last week when the tank was emptied.
After the second pump is installed the
date of putting the system in use, will
depend upon the laying of the pipes
on the campus, and if everything goes
as expected, the new equipment will
be finished in a month or six weeks.
WOLVERINE POSITIONS ARE
NOW OPEN TO APPLICANTS.
All candidates for the positions of
managing editor and business mana-
ger of the Wolverine must hand in
heir applications to Prof. F. N. Scott,
chairman of the board of student pub-
lications, at once. The appointments
will probably be made at the next
meeting of the board.
Y. W. C. A. May Give Luncheons.
Noon lunch will be served at New-
berry hall five schooldays of each
week next semester, for the benefit of
women living on the outskirts of the
city or neighboring towns. The meal
is to be provided at a minimum cost
and those interested in the project
should notify Miss Ellen Moore im-
mediately. Unless a sufficient num--
ber signify their intention to support

the luncheon plan it may have to be
abandoned.

St
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Extra Will Contain a Complete
of Guests and a Description
orI Big Dance.

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"LUCK TO Y OVJ , DAVIDVI

IHAS BIG BANQUET
Pres. Hutchins Addresses Gathering
at Astor House; Bear Roasted
in Barbecue Fashion.
FA:IIOUS GRADUATES PRESENT.
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins was the
guest of honor of the New York alum-
ni of the University of Michigan Fri-
day night at a yuletide dinner given
at the Hotel Astor. An Ontonagon
bear from the woods of northern
Michigan, roasted in barbecue fashion
and accompanied by a procession of
uniformed cooks and chefs, was car-
ried through the banquet hall. Earl
D. Babst, '94L, president of the New
York alumni, was toastmaster, and
the other speakers besides Pres.
Hutchins were, Calvin Thomas, '74;
Colonel Henry G. Prout, '71; and Jere-
miah W. Jenks, '78.
-The address of Pres. Hutchins was
on "Some of the Problems of the State
University." "Since the launching of
state universities conditions have been
rapidly changing," he said. "Instead
of being but an incidental burden, the
state university of today is fast be-
coming an expensive institution." He
then explained in detail the direct
service which the University of Mich-
igan furnishes to the state by means
of its extension lectures, its large hos-
pitals, its Pasteur institute, its free
sanitary analysis of drinking water,
and by its expert service to different
governmental departments of the
state.
COMMITTEE PICTURE HUNG
ON WALL OF ALUMNI ROOM.

MUSICAL CLUBS
WILL TAKE TRIP:
Schedule Provides for Appearances Iti
Port Iltiron, Saginaw, Detrolt
and Toledo-
ANNUAL c'ONCERT COMES MAY 23.
With two trips assured, the 1913
schedule of the Glee and Mandolin
clubs is beginning to assume definite
shape. Although a western trip, sim-
ilar to that taken by the combined
clubs last winter, has not been den-
nitely arranged, negotiations are be-
ing carried on with alumni in the
western states, and the prospects for
such a tour are said to be fairly en-
couraging.
The clubs will make their first out-
of-town appearapce of the year at
Port Huron, on February 21. The fol-
lowing evening, the musicians will re-
peat the same program in Saginaw.
On the second trip of the season, the
clubs will journey to Detroit for their
annual concert in that city on May 2.
The next day the musical organiza-
tions will appear in Toledo, returning
to Ann Arbor on May 4. The annual
combined concert of the men's and
women's glee and mandolin clubs will
be held on May 23.
REV. ALBERT FITCH WILL.
TALK AT UNION SUN)DAY.
Rev. Albert P. Fitch, president of the
Andover Theological Seminary, will
speak this afternoon at 3:00 o'clock at
the usual Sunday get-together at the
Michigan Union. The Rev. Fitch is a
imember of the board of preachers at
I Harvard, and preaches four times a
year in the Appleton chapel. He also

A souvenir issue of The Michigan
Daily will describe the Junior hop.
The paper will appear Saturday morn-
in;, February 8. Last year 3,000 cop-
ies were distributed and it is estimated
that a similar number will be publish-
ed this year. The souvenir will be
printed on blue paper and will contain
a complete list of Junior hop guests
and a cut of Miss Josephine Clay of
Detroit who will lead the grand march
with George B. Duffield, chairman of
the reception committee.
In addition to a description of the
hop itself the issue will contain nu-
merous features on the event and ar-
ticles concerning the entertainments
given to J hop guests by various cam-
pus organizations.
Mirs. Brewster Will Read "Ollantay."
Mrs. James II. Brewster, wife of
Prof. J. H. Brewster of the law de-
partment, will read "Ollantay," a
Spanish drama, in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall February 18. At the close
of the reading a special set of lantern
slides are to be shown depicting the
life and scenes of Peru.
Norman Wittet Visits City.
Mr. Norman Wittet; '11, formerly
connected with the staffs of Thie Mich-
igan Daily and the Gargoyle, was in
the city for a short time yesterday on
business.
UNION TO URGE
AQUATIC SPORTS.
Committee Will Consider Formation
of Canoe Club; May Regulate
Crafts on New Lake.
DIRECTORS APPROVE DANCE RULE

JUNIOR HOP TO
ATTRACT MANY
VISITIORS HERE
Musical Clubs Will Give Their Annual
Recital In University Hall; Com.
edy Club to Amuse Gerst
With "Money"
G AIIOYLE A Ni) "DAILY" TO
PRINT SOUVENIR EDITIONS
independents Will Meet Wednesday
and Decide Whether They Will
G ire Saturday Night Party.

SLL AM. W. WE DEMEVER, '94. 2
in, 3-'94L, the Hon. Charles E.
vnsend, '77 -78L, the Hon. John J.
tz, '82, and the Hon. William M.
th. The Rev. F. A. O'Conner of
Catholic church will ask the ben-
tion. Music will be furnished by
Whitney orchestra.
'ifteen representatives appo intec'
Speaker Champ Clark and six Unit-
States senators will be present in
alf of the government. The sena-
swho will attend will be Charlew
Townsend and William A. Smith
mn Michigan, Senator Ashurst of
zona: Senator Jones of Washing
Senator Kenyon of Iowa and Sen-
r Pomerene of Ohio. Seven state
ators will r:'present the legislature.
'he commnittee on a permanent me-
rial has di2uded to turn the money
sed into a fund for the purpose of
ding the Wedemeyer scholarship.
is i. to 1; given to students taking
straight law or the lit-law course
the university. It is expected tc
se a sum of $10,000 so that the
olarship may be kept up by the in-
est from the amount. Anyone de-
ng to contribute to the fund should'
emunicate with Frank C. Cole.,
Uion's Gt is on Display.
eth Heath. daughter of Mr.
dpi>. 1Homer Heath has been pre-
L!_c: with a silver service by the
an ion co:nnittees. This gift
I be on d:spiay with the various
natures all this week.

Definite action in the matter of or-
ganizing water sports on the Huron
river, was taken by the board of di-
rectors of the Michigan Union, at its
regular monthly luncheon and bus-
iness meeting yesterday. President'
Edward B. Kemp was authorized to
appoint a committee to consider the"
organization of aquatic sports. It will
be the duty of this body to determine
the advisability of forming a canoe
club, of adopting resolutions for the
regulation of all kinds of crafts on
the new lake, and of generally over-
seeing Huron river activities. The
personel of the committee will be an-
nounced at a later date.
The board of directors formally ex-
pressed its approval of the action tak-
en by the Union dance committee in
barring objectionable dancing at the
Saturday evening parties. It was vot-
ed to leave the regulation of these af-
fairs entirely in the hands of the com-
mittee. Other business of a routine
nature was transacted.
Latin 1, Will be Given Next Semester.
Students of Latin are being notified
that course one will be given the sec-
ond semester. The work includes Cic-
ero De Senectute and De Ami-
citia with Latin writing.
Prof. A. R. Crittenden will receive
the names of those wishing to elect
the subject. Four years Latin is a
prerequisite. The class is to be held.
at 1:00 or 2:00 o'clock, four days a
week.
Fresh Lits Plan Second Class Dinner.
Fresh lits will give the second of a
series of three dinners at the Union
Tuesday, February 11. Edward La-
zear, '13E, and Paul Wagner, '16E,
will be the principal speakers. There

Two short weeks of exams, and
Michigan will welcome her fairest vi,.
itors of the year-the J-hop girls. On
February 7 the gymnasiums, with their
gray beams hidden in a mass of gay
decorations, will swing open, to Michi-
gan's greatest social event of the
year. The twenty-first hop will then
be ready for the guests who will
come from every part of the United
States. Approximately 270 couples are
to attend.
Many university organizations have
planned entertainments for the week-
end. The combined musical clubs will
give their annual recital in Universi-
ty hall Thursday, and the Comedy
club will present "Money" at the Whit-
ney theater on Saturday. The Gar-
goyle and Michigan Daily will issue
hop numbers, containing a complete
list of the guests and chaperones.
An important meeting of the inde-
pendents will. be held Wednesday at
7:00 o'clock at the Union, when the
question of holding the customary for-
mal party Saturday night will be fin-
ally settled. The last meeting of the
combined committees will be held
February 1 at the Alpha Del-ta Phi
house at 7:00 o'clock.
GERMAN FACULTY TO CORRECT
ERRORS FOR VEREIN PLAYERS
In order to correct errors in pro-
nunciation arrangements have been
made for each member of the cast of
the Deutscher Verein play to read his
or her part before some member of the
German faculty before the beginning
of the next semester. The first re-
hearsal of the second semester will
be held Monday evening, February 10
from 7:00 to 8:00 o'clock.
OFFER PRIZE FOR BEST ESSAY.
Colonial Dames Ask for Papers on
Slave Trade.
With the object of stimulating wid-
er interest in American history, the
National Society of Colonial Dames of
America in Michigan, has recently an-
nounced a prize to the students of the
university for the best essays on the
subject, "The Attitude of the Govern-
ment of England and the English Col-
onies Toward the African Slave Trade
to 1776." The contest offers two priz-
es of $50 and $25 for the best papers
on this subject, and has the following
regulations: The contest will be open
to all students of the junior and sen-
ior classes who have not before com-
peted. The essays must not contain
over 3,000 words nor less than 2,500,
and two copies of each must be in the
hands of the committee before April
1, 1913. The writers are requested
to sign their papers with a pseudonym,
to include their real names in an ac-
companying letter, and to place their
work in the hands of Professors Van
Tyne and Phillips for submission.

A picture of the first Alumni Memo- conducts the daily chapel services for
rial committee has been hung on the two weeks during the year at that in-
north wall of the alumni room in stitution.
Memorial hall. The pictures of the ---- --
various members of the committee 13imes Want Skits for Union Dinners.
were taken separately and then plac- Skits suitable for presentation at
ed on one background and framed to- the monthly Union dinners are wanted
gether. The names of the committee by the Mimes, the Union opera society.
are as follows: Claudius B. Grant, The skits should be of about fifteen
chairman, George H. Hopkins, Edward minutes duration, and should be so
W. Pendleton, Hoyt Post, Prof. Mar-' arranged that musical numbers can be
tin L. D'Ooge, William H. Brown, interspersed at different points. Mein-
Franklin H. Walker, Dean Victor C. bers of the Mimes will do the "acting."
Vaughan, Clarence AI. Burton, and All skits should be handed in at the
Charles B. Warren. Union by February 10.
j1rsbtertan- Church
10.30 En iren ment, a Natural Law viewed tr ni a Spiritual World.
Address by Mr. Barrett.

Ohl Grad Here on Visit.
The Hon. Samuel C. Park, '91, pres-
ent mayor of Salt Lake City, made a
visit here yesterday to see his son,
Boyd T. Park, '16. Mr. Park is engaged
in the jewelry business.

6:30

yoing Peoples' Meeting. Everybody Welcome.
Stereopicon -,- "India"

will also be speeches
the fresh lit class.

by members ofI

- e

...

nion Guild

R&bcrt

11av~hc J'itch

PRESBYTERIAN

Series

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUETTS

CHURCH

'

'I

of America's Greatest Preachers. Fourth Time in Ann Arbor

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