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January 22, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-22

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,,

.00
$2.51

* 1

The

Michigan

Daily

ILocal $2.00°
flail $2.50I

* 83. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENTS

USICAL CLUBS
RE READ FOR
SHP RECITAL,
bined Organizations Have Plan-
ned Many New 'Features for
quests on Feb. 6. Lead.
ers are Optimistic.
L GIVE TWO NEW SONGS
WRITTEN BY W. A. DIEKEMA

*

I

THE WEATHER MAN

I

IL

out Training of Regular
Director Considers Clubs
Prepared.

Trip

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Thursday,
increasing cloudiness with snow or
rain; warmer; moderate southerly
winds.
University Observatory-Wednesday
7:00 p. m., temperature, 27.4; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
35.4; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 16.8; average wind velocity
7 Wiles per hour.
TRYOUTS FOR OPERA ROLES
GIVEN PARTS TO MEMORIZE
Men who intend to tryout for the
reading roles in the 1913 Union opera
will meet at the Michigan Union this
evening, at which time portions of the
book will be given out for memori-
zation. Only those tryouts who have
received postal cards from the chair-
man are expected to attend this even-
ing's session.
U.S OFFICIALSTO
ATTEND'SERVICE

which translated is "The drama of -to- was accepted with regret by the class

day and its relation to contemporary
manners" will be the subject of a lec-
ture to be given this evening
at 8:00 o'clock in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. by M. Firmin Roz, of the
University of France. The speaker,

at a meeting yesterday. He was made
an honorary nm:ember of -the 1913 lits
and will be a! le to participate in all
social activitit s of the class. The
date of the new election has been set
by the student :council as Wednesday,

FRENCH AUTHOR
SPEAKS TODAY
f. Roz, of UiIversity of France, Will
Talk on "'The Theater
of Today."
NO ADMISSION TO BE CHARGED,.
"Le Theatre d'aujourd'hui. Ses rap-
ports avec les moeurs contemporains,"

RESIGNATION OF
ABBOTT ACCEPTED
is Made honorary Member of Senior
Lit (hiss. To Bold Offijee
Temporarily.
TO HOLD NEW BALLOT FEB. 12.i
The resignation of Harold Abbott
as president o' the senior lit class,

All arrangements have been com-
pleted for the J hop concert, which
the combined glee and mandolin clubs
will give in University Hall on Thurs-
day evening, February 6. The concert
will be given by the 'entire home club
of the combined organizations and will
probably be the only recital given by
the clubs in Ann Arbor. The entertain-
mnent to be given will be a finished
performance as the men have been
working regularly ever since the op-
3ning of college.}
Two new songs written by W. A.i
Diekema, '14, will be heard for the
irst time. "'Twas Ever Thus" will be
soloed by R. J. Simmons and "Old But
Gay" will be given by the entire glee
club. A number of other new features
will be introduced, chief among which
s a sextette composed of Westerman,
Ogden, Moritz, Sutton, Simmons and
Kemp. The Varsity quartette will also
give a selection. "Bill" Williams, who
furnished much of the entertainment
n last year's concert will have some
new stunts. Solos will be given by
Bruce D. Bromley, F. T. E. Munson,
K. N. Westerman, J-. H. Wilkins and
R. J. Simmons.
William Howland, musical director
>f the clubs, said: "I think the con-
ert this year will be one of the best
wver given by the music'al clubs. The
alent on the clubs is unusually high
and from a musical standpoint it is
one of the best in years. Despite the
fact that the training of a trip has not
been given, the clubs are in shape to
>resent an excellent concert."
Both R. J. Simmons, leader of the.
;lee club and I E. Lattimer, leader of
he mandolin club are optimistic con-
erning the entertainment.I A num-
>er of Michigan songs are on the pro-
;ram and they will be given a promi-
nent part for the benfit of the J hop
;uests. It has been definitely decided
by the hop representatives to go to
he recital formally and the organi-
ations to be represented at the hop
have already drawn for their seats.
'he concert will be held in University
Tall. $1.00 will be charged for seats
n the lower floor and 50 cents for
he balcony.
PROFESSORS WINTER ABROAD.
rof. Pillsbury, Dr. Adams and Dr.
Austin Travel in Europe.
Several Michigan professors are
pending the winter abroad this year.
ord has just been received from
Prof. Pillsbury at Algiers. He is now
>n his way to Athens where he expects
o spend 'two weeks. Prof. Pillsbury
tated that there were 1,500 Greeks in
he steerage of the boat on which he
rossed the ocean. The Greeks were
Doinghome to enlist in the army.
Dr. E. L. Adams, formerly connect-
d with the romance language depart-
ment of the engineering department is
wintering in Paris. Dr. H. D. Austin,
nstructor in French in the literary
Iepartment, expects to leave San
Francisco February 6 for a trip around'

whose eminence is recognized on this I February 12.

Senators and Representatives,
Present at Wedemeyer
Memorial Meeting.

to beI

PRES. HUTCHINS WILL PRESIDE.
Well-known lawyers and jurists of
many states and a delegation of 15
representatives and six senators from
congress will take part in the memo-
rial services which are to be held in
Univer'sity Hall Sunday afternoon at
2:30 o'clock.
President Harry B. Hutchins will
preside. 'he invocation will be asked
by the Rev. Samuel A. John of Beth-
lehem church. A biographical sketch
of Congressman Wedemeyer is to be
given by Frank A. Stevens'. Addresses
are to be delivered by Dean Henry M.
Bates of the law department; the Hon.
Arthur J. Tuttle judge of the Federal
District court at Detroit; the Hon.
Franz Kuhn, of the state supreme
court; the Hon. Chas. E. Townsend,
U. S. Senator from Michigan; the Hon.
John L. Lentz, ex-congressman from
Columbus, Ohio, and the Hon. Frank
B.Willis, congressman from the eighth
Ohio district. The benediction will be
asked by the Rev. F. A. O'Connor of
the Catholic church. Members of
the senior. lit and senior law classes
will act as ushers.
Subscriptions to the fund intended
to establish a Wedemeyer memorial
scholarship are coming in quite rapid-
ly. Anyone desiring to make a contri-
bution to this fund should communi-
cate with Frank C. Cole of this city.
HOP COMMITTEES TO FINISH
PLANS AT MEETING TODAY.
Combined committees for the J hop
will meet at the Alpha Delta Phi house
this afternoon at 4:30 o'clock. At this
meeting, committee chairmen will
make final reports. Representatives
will be present from the musical clubs
and also from the Comedy club to dis-
tribute tickets for hop productions of
the two organizations.
The independents will meet to make
final plans at the Michigan Union to-
morrow afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.
DOCTOR WARTHIN RETURNS
FRO Ii ANSAS LECTURE TOUR
Dr. A. S. Warthin of the medical de-
partment has recently returned from
a tour through the state of Kansas
where he has been delivering lectures
on "Sex Hygiene." He spoke in the
cities of Lawrence, Topeka, Hutchin-
son and Wichita and in some of the
larger towns throughout the state.
Tryouts Must Elect Dramatic Course.
All tryouts for the senior girls'
play are expected to elect the course
in dramatic technic next semester in
the English department, given by Prof.
L. A. Strauss. From those who show
ability in the class members of the
cast will be chosen. Permission to
take this course must be obtained
from the senior play committee at
Barbour gym Thursday between 5:00
and q:00 o'clock p. m.

continent as well as in Europe will be
presented under the auspices of the
university. Admission will be free.
M. Roz, who for many years past
has specialized on the lecture plat-
form, is both an educator of note and
an author. In France he is widely
known in journalism, having for many
years contributed dramatic reviews to
the leading dramatic and literary
magazines.
During years past he has been del-
egated by educational institutions of
France to lecture in his own country
and abroad. He is especially familiar
with the United States, having visited
the country many times and talked in
many of the leading universities and
colleges. He has always carried back
with him material which has enabled
him to write of the American peope,
as is evidenced by his contributions
to "Le Revue des deux Mondes," by
"The Representative Men of Emer-
son," and his essays on "American
Idealism" and "American Energy."
The latter work published in 1910
was crowned by the Academie Fran-
caise and in 1912 the committee Fran-
co-American awarded him the prize
of a thousand francs, founded by
James H. Hyde as a reward .to "the
author of a literary work most useful
in developing friendly relations be-
tween France and the United States."
While in this country on this occas-
ion M. Roz is being presented by the
French Alliance of the United States
whose headquarters are in New York
city.
TICIiETS FOR UNION DANCE
TO BE PUT ON SALE TODAY
Tickets for the weekly Saturday
night ;Michigan Union dance will be
put on sale at the Union at 5:00 o'clock
this afternoon. As usual the sale will
be limited to one hundred couples.
Dr. Vaughan to address legislatre.
Dr. V. C. Vaughan of the medical
department left yesterday morning
for Lansing, where he is to deliver
his lecture on "Eugenics" or "Race
Betterment" before the legislature.
This lecture will probably be re-
peated in Ann Arbor within a short
time, as Dean Vaughan has expressed
a willingness to speak on this sub-
ject whenever called upon.
Prof. Adams Addresses Barristers.
Prof. H. C. Adams of the political
economy department addressed the
Barristers at a luncheon held at the
Michigan Union yesterday noon.
He spoke on "The Necessity of a
Knowledge of Accounting for the Law-
yer."
Dean Bates to Speak at Kansas City.
Dean Henry M. Bates will address
the Bar association of Kansas City,
Missouri, at the banquet February 1.
The "Recall of Judicial Decisions" is
to be the subject of his speech.
HISTORY CLASS IN FAVOR
OF HONOR CODE IN FINALS.
Professor l. R. Turner's English
history class voted in favor of taking
the final examination under the hon-
or system. Out of about 300 only six
voted in the negative. This class took
the mid-semester examination under
this system and that it proved success-
ful is shown by the overwhelming ma-
jority in its favor. The part of the
pledge requiring students to report
any evidence of cheating is not includ-
ed in the history class's pledge.

It was voted in the acceptance of the
resignation that Abbott remain in of-
fice until the inauguration of a new
president sometime during the second
semester. It was felt that a lapse in
the presidency would work against the
best interests of the class as regards
several important matters now pend-
ing in the office.
This action on the part of Abbott
came as a result of his finding that he
would be unable to graduate this year-
owing to work taken in the engineer-
ing department with the expectation
that he would be admitted to a com-
bined lit-engineering course. At the
time of the election last fall no ques-
tion of Abbott's eligibility was made
and he thought that he was eligible to
take part in the activities of the class.
It was not until last week that he
learned definitely that he would not be
able to graduate and by his own voli-
tion he resigned his office.
The crux of the whole difficulty, it
is said, lies in the fact that the mem-
ber of the student council in charge
of the senior lit election this fall fail-
ed to verify the nominations at the
registrar's office to find out about the
eligibility of the nominees.
Subsequent to the resignation of
Abbott a motion was unanimously
passed in class meeting yesterday to
the effect that the secretary enter on
the journal a resolution expressing the
earnest regrets of the class as to the
unfortunate circumstances surround-
ing the election of the president and
thanking him for the service which
he has done the class this year.
Dean J. R. Eflinger, speaking in re-
gard to the matter says: "I believe
that Mr. Abbott acted in perfect good
faith in accepting the nomination and
election, but that later developments
showed him that he was not eligible."
Reports of some of the committees
were also given but nothing of a defi-
nite nature was submitted.
SECRETARY AND PRESIDENT
ATTENDING ALUMNI DINNERS
Secretary Shirley W. Smith left, yes-
terday afternoon for New York city,
where this evening he will attend an
informal dinner of alumni given at
the university club by Earl D. Babst,
'94L, president of the New York alum-
ni association. Pres. H. B. Hutchins
will be one of the guests at the gath-
ering. Friday evening both Pres.
Hutchins and Mr. Smith will be pres-
ent at the annual dinner of the New
York Alumni association.
Prof. Reighard to Lecture on Fishes.
Prof. J. E. Reighard of the zoolog-
ical department will deliver an ad-
dress on "The Home Life of Michigan
Fishes" in Detroit Friday evening,
January 31.. The lecture will be giv-
en under the auspices of the Detroit
Institute of Science and will be illus-
trated by stereoptican views of mem-
bers of the finny tribe in the water
amid their natural surroundings.
Professor Hldner to Address Verein.
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner of the German
department will speak before the sen-
ior women's section of the Deutscher
Verein at 6:45 o'clock tonight. His
subject will be "German Lyric Poetry"
and he will demonstrate with vocal se-
lections.
To Present Review of "Silas Mariner."
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's class in in-
terpretative reading will give a public
review of "Silas Mariner" in room 302
N. W. tonight at 8:00 o'clock.

HARVARD GRADUATE IS NEW
INSTRUCTOR IN ECONOMICS.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman, a graduate of
Harvard University, and Harvard law
school, has been secured by the eco-
nomics department to take charge of
the second semester courses formerly
given by the late Prof. H. S. Smalley.
He will have charge of course six,
dealing with transportation problems,
and of course 45 which is an introduc-
tion to the study of law.
The major part of the lectures in
economics two, will be given by Prof.
Henry C. Adams. The quiz work and
problems will be under the supervis-
ion of Mr. W. H. Hamilton.
During the past year Prof. Sharf-
man has been in the service of the
National Civic Federation investigat-
ing the regulation of interstate and
municipal utilities. He was formerly
professor of law and economics in the
newly established university of Tien-
tsin, China.
THESPIANS RENEW
WORK ON "MONEY"
Rehearsals Begin Again for Junior
Hop Performance of the Comedy
Club on Feb. S.
NEW INSIGNIA WILL BE GIVEN.
Again back to work, the Comedy
club is swinging into shape for its
second presentation of "Money"
which as a special feature of Junior
hop week will be given at the Whit-
ney theater Saturday afternoon, Feb-
ruary 8, at 2:15 o'clock. Te Thes-
pians at rehearsal yesterday, which
was run off in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, showed that the vacation had not
made them forget the lines of the
play, as the complete performance was
gone through without a hitch.
Frequent rehearsals will be held
from now on until the time of presen-
tation, and Mr. Bert St. John will
again be on hand to coach the play-
ers in stage work and crossing. The
performance will be given with' the
same effects which were used at the in-
itial performance of December 14.
Subsequent to the performance of
"Money," new lights who have come
into the fold this year will be award-
ed the insignia of the club. It is ex-
pected that a change will be made
from the old Comedy club pin which
has been in vogue for many years
past. As to what the new insignia.
shall be. nothing definite as yet has
been decided upon. It is hoped that
a uniform decoration of some sort will
be given, and that all members will
be identified by the same insignia. On-
ly one insignia will be given to each
member and older players will not be
advanced from the pin to the fob and
the gold bar fob as has been the cus-
tom in the past.
CONGRESSMAN-ELECT BEAKES
RETURNS FROM WASHINGTON:
Congressman-elect Samuel W.
Beakes, '80-'83L, returned from Wash-
ington, D. q., yesterday after a visit,
to the capital, where ne will reside af-
ter next March.
"Michigan graduates are very prom-
inent in the field of politics," said Mr.
Beakes. "I saw many Michigan men
in Washington, especially in Congress,
and I was proud of them."
Freshman is Called Home by Sickness
Oscar Rasmus, '16, left Ann Arbor
Wednesday afternoon for his home in
Spokane, Wash., where he was sud-

denly called by the serious illness of
his father. He expects to return in
time for the beginning of the second
semester.
Methodist Students Hold Carnival.
Methodist students and their friends
will hold a skating carnival at Wein-
berg's rink on South Fifth avenue to-
night. Tickets are being sold by
members and may be had at the door
of the rink.
Class Will Give "Comedy of Errors."
Prof. Trueblood's class in Shakes-
pearean reading will give a public re-
cital of "The Comedy of Errors" in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall Friday ev-
ening.

MICHIGAN CANE
MAY BE ADOPTED
DY 1013 CLASSES
Lits Try to Co-operate With Senior
Engineers to Establish a
Uniform Type For
All Members.
SENIOR LAWS HAVE CHOSEN
STICK WITH CLASS NUMERALS
-
Crooked Mahogany Cane With Silver
Band is Choice
of Laws.
Seniors will appear on the campus
in a few weeks with real professional
dignity. A mahogany cane with en-
graved silver trimmings is destined to
be part of the equipment of the cam-
pus gentleman. It is probable that
by the cooperation of the senior lits
and engineers a Michigan cane will
be established.
At a meeting of the senior lits yes-
terday the souvenir committee which
has the matter in charge reported as
in favor of carrying canes. The report
was accepted and the committee will
confer with the 1913 engineers with
the aim of establishing a Michigan
cane. The engineers have also placed
the matter in the hands of a commit-
tee which is considering various pat-
terns. Whether the two departx ents
cooperate or whether department can-
es are' used, the Prince of Wales type
will probably be adopted.
The idea originated with the senior
engineers but probably the laws will
be the first to actually place an order
for the walking stick. Although tile
committee from the lit class conferr-
ed with the laws in regard to adopting
a uniform cane for all classes, the
latter were in favor of following out
the original idea of the committee,
namely of adopting a department cane.
The laws discussed the matter of
carrying canes at a meeting late in
the fall. A committee was appointed
which was to have ultimate right of
decision. The committee recently de-
cided definitely on the matter and at
present over 100 have promised to buy
the stick. An order will be sent in
at once through G. 0. Woolfolk, 316
South State street. The pattern se-
lected is a crooked mahogany stick
of the Prince of Wales type. Each one
will be embellished by a silver band
on which the class numerals will be
engraved. Others have signified their
intention of buying canes and it is ex-
pected that another order will be plac-
ed later.
MANY PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS
ASK DEAN FOR INFORMATION.
Requests for information concern-
ing the university are being received
daily by Dean John R. Effinger, and
although it is too early to estimate
the increase in attendance which the
new semester will bring about it is
evident that many new students will
enroll for the spring semester. An in-
quiry was recently received from a
Mohammedan man at Agra, India, ask-
ing if courses were given in scientific
agriculture.
Michigan Alumni Dine at Washington.
The Washington alumni association
of the University of Michigan held its

annual meeting and banquet at Wash-
ington last night. President Hutchins
attended and delivered an address.
Senator Townsend and other Michigan
graduates in Congress spoke.
Grad Elected Republican Chairman.
Allan H. Fraser, '81, was recently
elected chairman of the Republican
state convention to be held in Lan-
sing February 11. He was elected by
the state central committee over -ex-
governor Osborn.
G. A. Andrews Will Deliver Reading.
G. A. Andrews, '13, will deliver a
reading of "Tom Sawyer" at Flatrock
Friday evening on the Lyceum club
circuit

REEVES TALKS ON 1
ATIONS OF DEMOCRAC"
se S. Reeves of political
>artment gave an address
n the Unitarian church on
tions of Democracy." The
s made under the auspices
rcollegiate Socialist society
bring here later in the year,
Russell,journalist and mag-
r, Judge Strickland, of
Ohio, and Carl D. Thomp-

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