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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1913 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rSHOE

$4.00
and
$5.00

$5.00
and
$6.00

Ws.ner f Co.
STATE STREET
Sign'of the BiglWhite Shoe

"

JANUARY
SH O

CLEAN

UP

SALE

Every pair including FLORSH EIM
ENGLISH CUTS, cut to the limit.
We expect in new Spring Styles
about Feb. 1st, and wish to clean
up all our present stock. See win=
dow for prices.
Full Line of Skating Shoes
The Campus Bootery
308 South State Street
Grange r's Acek.4deamy of Dm mo in g
Join the classes now. Term begins with your first lesson. Learn the
Boston. Private lessons given by appointment. Rentthe Academy for
your next party. For rates call at Academy or Phone 246.
N' Watch for N
Ahe Bl~uP Book, Display
-~~~~t
tvhe Blue Front Store
Hart, Schaffner

Y. W. C. A. TO GIVE PAGEANT.
Person allyConducted Trip Through
Foreign Lands Comes Feb. 15.
A personally conducted trip to for-
eign lands in pageant form is to be
offered by a cast of 70 women at New-
berry hall February 15. The numer-
ous rooms of the hall will be fitted
up to represent the places visited.
Beginning in Michigan, the first stop
will be at a small country town in
the state where the visitors will be
entertained by a club of country girls.
From here a visit to Ellis Island to
inspect the immigration bereau is to
be made. Especial attention will be
paid to the representation of the Uni-
versity hospital at Bushra, Arabia.
New China will be paid the next visit
and members of the Chinese students
club will be in charge. A visit to
India and the great Indian educator
Charada-Sedan of Pandita Ramabi
comes next in order. An afternoon
in Buenos Ayres, South America will
be the last on the program.
This event is the largest undertak-
ing that the Y. W. C. A. has attempted
this year and all efforts are to be
made to make the affair a success.
Senior Lit Makes His Debut as Poet.
In the January number of the
wood n saadde XaIsa8o utapwy
written by Jack Welch '13 called
"The New Forest Assistant." It is
written "with apoigies to the author
of the Young British Soldier,." 'In
eight verses it gives advice to the
young collegians who start out to
make themselves practical woodsmen.
Former Prominent Student Gets
Place* in Law Office.
Albert R. Dilley, formerly a mem-
ber of the attorney general's staff
under Roger I. Wykes, is now with
the law firm of Wykes & Thornton
of Grand Rapids. Mr. Dilley was
graduated from the literary depart-
ment in 1910 and from the law de-
partment last year. While a student
here, he was business manager of
the Michigan Daily and an associate
editor of the Michigan Law Review.
HEAVY VOTE IS CAST IN ELEC.
TION.
(Continued from page 1.
yond the report of the treasurer, which
was accepted, there was no official
business.
The report of Tfeasurer Butler is as
follows:
Balance on hand January
13th, 1912 ..............$15,429.67
Receipts
Football .................$34,399,38
Baseball ................... 1,516.26
Track . . ................... 1,951.35
Tennis ....................73.70
Hockey..................... 20.00
Basketball ..................15.50
General
Student fees . $22,121.00
Faculty fees .. 285.00
M.iscellaneous .. 1,938.38 24,344.38
Total ..................$62,320.57
Grand Total ............. $77,750.24
Disbursements
Football ...................$28,488.40
Baseball . ....... . .. . . . ..... 2,775.41
Track .....................3,497.22
Tennis . ....................120.32
Hockey..................... 49.40
Soccer..................... 11.00

General ..,................ 7,344.96
Ferry field, labor, supplies
and minor improvements .7,536.26
Ferry Field Imp. Fund
Club H. pay. ..$11,176.61
New field pay... 8,516.68
Bal in F. F. fund 136.96 19,830.25
Total.................$69653.22
Bal on hand Jan. 18th 1913 $8,097.02
Less amount due on time
loan ..................... 800.00
Net balance ................ $7,297.02

COMMUNICATIONS
(This paper assumes no responsibili-
ty for sentiments expressed in com-
munications.)
Editor, Michigan Daily:-
The Daily recently advocated the
adoption by the council of the follow-
ing rule governing the election of
members to that body: "No candidate
for nomination or election to the stu-
dent council shall be eligible to elec-
tion or a seat in the council by or for
whom electioneering of any sort has
been proved to have been done, with
or without his knowledge or consent."
I respectfully contend that such a
rule is impracticable and impossible
of enforcement; that even if possible
of enforcement, it would often work
injustice; and of greater moment still,
by its operation, the end sought would
not necessarily be gained.
Doubtless it will be conceded with-
out argument that as to its effective-
ness, the most the operation of such a
rule could achieve without the unani-
mous co-operation of the entire voting
body, would be to banish open and no-
torious soliciting of support. Further
than that, it would be only a moral
impediment to clandestine vote-get-
ting and those who failed to see the
justice of the rule would not feel them-
selves bound thereby. Moreover, un-
der the technical operation of the rule,
the subtler forms of campaigning
could not be covered, and expressions
of choice of ideas as to fitness, could
not be stopped.
Again, if the rule was to be constru-
ed logically, it would necessarily have
to prevent the renomination for a sec-
ond election of the party first chosen.
For the rule seeks to annul all elec-
tions in any wise associated with elec-
tioneering, and any reelection of the
same party could not but be integrally
connected with the previous campaign-
ing. Otherwise we would have the
farcical situati6n of an election of one
day declared invalid because of undue
influence, but the reelection on the
following day solemnly declared free
from the taint,-the mind of the voter
having been miraculously freed over-
night from the influence of the solici-
tation. Such an interpretation would
be absolutely unjust to the innocent
victim of over-zealous friends, and
might prevent the fittest candidate
from gaining a merited office.
Again, the theory is of course, that
the operation of the rule would me-
chanically tend toward the selection
of the best man,-a sort of survival of
the fittest. It proceeds on the assump-
tion that solicitation of votes is in-
compatible with a wise choice. I
fail to see the logic of the assumption.
In fact, my position is exactly the op-
posite. For in university classes as
large as we have here, there are not
one or two who stand out as pre-em-
inently qualified. Our judgments are
largely matters of likes and dislikes,
and many a good man could only be
elected by concerted action. Many a
good man too, would have been over-
looked had he not been called to mind
by others. I believe the tendency of
the rule would be to allow one to slip
in who would have been repudiated as
the real choice of the class, if the
matter had been openly -considered
previous to the election; and thus the
very purpose of the rule would be de-
feated.
And any inherent evil' in the old
system is not apparent, for the past
fails to reveal any notoriously unfit
men elected to the council under the

old system. Furthermore, the average
student is not easily persuaded by oth-
ers to vote against his own judgment,
and a request for support seldom re-
sults in a vote for one whom the voter
considers unfit.
R. O. POST, '14L.

ister."

Seat Sale, Friday, Jan. 17th.

NEW WHITNEY THEATRE

the forest Lawn tea

IRoorn

In her Most Famous Success

Monday, Jan. 20th, at 8:00
Charles Frohman Presents
MaudeA as

Peter

Pan

Will be open for "Peter Pan" Parties

604 Forest Ave.

Phone 12384

By J. M. Barrie, author of "The Little Min-

F ire

A -do
ma6-le

UNTIL

ALL STOCK IS SOLD

E.

R.

FRS

302 S. State Street

Fine Repairing: Watches, Jewelry, Foun-
tain Pens, Eye-Classes and Spectacles
Bring In the Broken Pieces
Lenses Duplicated
Hailer JewelryCo.
308 S. State St. Phone 643

&

Marx

Debating Team Returns Today.
Prof. R.D.T. Hollister and the nega--The
tive debating team are expected back
from Evanston this morning. No ad-St e S vings
ditional word has "been received from Wm J Booth, President Wm. Arnold,
them relative to their contest. C. John WalZ, Jr., Cashier
CLOSING OUT

dank
vice-President

CLOTHE

AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES

E. A.

WRIGHT CALENDARS
-25c

A

B

U

S*

Y

B

Ei

E

ow
r

313 SOUTH STATE
ICE CREAM SODA, LUNCHES, FINE CANDIES

Cl othing Store
217 South Main
The Store that Satisfies

'I

t

long period of debate followed, and
after several more ballots the local

TEACHERS TO MEET HERE NEXT
FALL.
(Continued from page 1.)
vote, but still lacked one to have the
required majority of five. Another

i
1
+A
l
C

advocates won.
"Now that the association has def-
initely decided to meet in Ann Arbor,
we must make everyone realize that
the teachers' entertainment while here
is worthy of everybody's best efforts,"
said Prof. C. 0. Davis, of the educa-
tion department yesterday. "It will
do both the city and the university a

great deal of good. It is the civic
duty of everyone living in the vicinity
of the university to co-operate with
the committee in providing.accommo-
dations. The fraternities and sorori-
ties have already given us a great
amount of encouragement and if those
we have not heard from come to our
assistance in the same generous man-
ner, the coming meeting of the state
association will be a big success."

I

I

rrirrr

MICHIGANENSIAN PHOTOGRAPHS.

. C. MA EDEL,

ARE MADE BY
of Our
Thee Photographer ┬░fTown

Three Doors West of State Street

06 19 E. L

r, r A

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