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January 18, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


0 $2.00
Mail _$2.50

The

Michigan

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ANN ARBOR,.MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1913.

MICHIGAN TRIO
GETS DECISION
OVERCHICAGO
Judges are Unanimous in Opinion;
Home Debaters Outclass
Oppoieints at Almost
Every Stage.
TEAM AT NORTHWESTERN IS
)EFEATED BY 2 TO 1 VOTE.
Total Points Give Michigan First
Place in Central De-
bating League.
Michigan won the Central Debating
League championship for 1913 last
night, the standing being: Michigan,
4 judges; Northwestern 3 judges; and
Chicago 2 judges.
The affirmative teams won at home
in every contest on the proposition of
Congressional adoption of the Nation-
al Monetary Commission plan of bank-
ing reform. Michigan defeated Chica-
go unanimously in University Hall,
lost to Northwestern at Evanston by
a 2 to 1 decision, and Chicago defeat-
ed Northwestern in Chicago by the
same count.
"Michigan unanimously," announced
Gov. Ferris last night, at the conclu-
sion of one of the most interesting
debates ever held in University Hall.
The Chicago men, as their coach ex-
plained, based their chances upon one
point--and lost. Michigan on the oth-
er hand, had four major points, and
met the chief point of their opponents
with seven arguments.
All of the men are to be commend-
ed upon their excellent work, but the
logical, forceful, and perfectly pre-
sented arguments of Paul Blanshard
stood out from all the others. For
Chicago, Conrad was the most effect-
ive speaker; and there is no question
as to why he led the Colgate Univer-
sity team three times.
The result at Northwestern was
somewhat of a surprise, as a victory
was expected. All of the men on the
negative team are debaters of inter-
collegiate experience, while the home
team was unexperienced in such work.
The fact that the affirmative team won
in all three of the league contests,
however, is significant in showing that
the question might have been a more
happily chosen one.
The only comment in the telegram to
the Daily from Prof. Hollister was that
the contest was a most excellent one,
and that the Michigan men did excep-
tionally well at the home of their op-
ponents.
The men spoke in the following or-
der, Michigan, having the affirmative,
starting: Lyman S. Hlbert, '14L; W-
A. Hamman,''14L; Bartel J. Jonkman,
'14L; P. K. Cook, '15; Paul B. Blan-
(Continued on page 4.)
Michigan Man Mocks
-Medicine by Mandolin
"Dean Cooley may I bring my man-
, olin up and play a few Michigan
songs for you?"
The corridors of the Baltimore hos-
pital were lined with people when
"Bos" Gage, '11E, former leader of the
mandolin club started strumming up
his instrument and struck up that
heart stirring melody "The Victots."
Seldom does that indefinable quality,
Michigan spirit manifest itself as well
as in this little example. Gage, who

is practicing his profession in Balti-
more heard that his former dean was
ill in that city and after chasing all
over town, located him in the Johns
Hopkins hospital, and the above in-
oident occurred.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Local
snows with lower temperature; brisk
and high west and northwest winds.
University Observatory-Friday 7:00
p. in., temperature, 42.9; maximum
temperature, 24 hours preceding, 51.8;
minimum temperature, 24 hours pre-
ceding, 41.4; average wind velocity
1,700 miles per hour.
Y. W. C. A. Will Have Party Today.
The regular membership party of
the Y. W. C. A. will be held in the
parlors of Newberry, hall this
afternoon from 4:00 o'clock until 6:00
o'clock. This entertainment is open to
members only.
ATHLETIC ELECTION
TO BE HELD TODAY
Four Offices to be Filled at Semi-An-
nual Ballot; Voters Must Bring
Coupon Books.
ANNUAL MEETING IN AFTERNOON
Place-Room 101. University Hall.
Time-9:00 a. in.-1:00 p. m.
The' seii-annual election of. the
athletic association will be held today
in University hall from 9:00 to 1:00
o'clock, with four offices to be filled.
New men will be elected to the office
of football mmanager interscholastic
manager, secretary and treasurer, and
all of these men automatically become
members of the board of directors.
The former system of voting has been
done away with and the members will
be required to present coupon num-
ber 12 of their book to secure a ballot.
.'Room 101 of U. hall will be the bal-
loting place and the present board of
directors have announced that no cam-
paigning will be allowed near or
around the doors or halls. No other
identification will be required except
the signed coupon number 12 and it
is expected that this will greatly fa-
cilitate the voting. Owing to the in-
terest in the election it is believed that
a record breaking vote will be cast.
Annual Meeting this Afternoon.
Following close on the heels of the
election Xvill come the annual open
meeting of the athletic association in
U. hall auditorium this afternoon at
three o'clock. This meeting is open to
all members of the association and is
held for the purpose of receiving the
reports of the secretary and treasurer.
These reports cover the entire year
and it is probable that they will be
of considerable interest. At this time
the results of'the election will besoffi-
cially announced.
Student Has $23 Stolen From Room.
L. H. Benton, '16E, a tackle on this
year's All-Fresh football team, had
$23 taken from his room on Thompson
street some time Thursday afternoon.
He left a pocketbook containing the
money lying on his desk and when he
returned it was gone.
EXAMS HAVE NO EFFECT UPON
UNION DANCE TICKET SALE.
Despite the recent epidemic of par-
ties, and the proximity of examina-
tions, tickets for tonight's dance at
the Michigan Union have sold at a
lively rate. - Only 20 of the. admission
cards remained to be disposed of last
evening.
Chaperones for the dance will be
Dean and Mrs. J. R. Effinger, and Dr.

and Mrs. Cumming. The committee in
charge is composed of Morris A. Mil-
ligan, '14, chairman, 11. Beach Carpen-
ter, '14, Jerome Ditchy, '13, and George
Duffield, '14E.

If You Would Vote Today--

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TAKE THIS WITH Y OU TO U. HALL!

SERVICE, TO BE
HELD IN HONOR
OF WE.DEMEYER
Memorial Meeting Will Be Given For
Late U. S. Representative
Sunday Afternoon,
January 26.
SENATE AND HOUSE MEMBERS
TO REPRESENT GOVERNMENT.

Wedemeyer
Fund

Memorial Scholarship
of $10,000 Will Be
Founded.

Memorial services in honor of Hon.
W. W. Wedemeyer, whose death occur-
red near Panama several weeks ago,
will be held in University Hall at 2:00
o'clock Sunday afternoon, January 26.
Arrangements for the meeting are
now being made by the committee in
charge and the program will be pub-
lished the first of the week. Pres. H.
B. Hutchins will preside and the Unit-
ed States government will be repre-
sented by a committee of six senators
and 15 representatives, the represen-
tatives having been appointed by
Champ Clark, speaker of the House.
The porsonel of the committees has
not yet been announced but among
those who will attend will be Senators
Charles E. Townsend and William Al-
den Smith, of Michigan; Senator Ash-
urst, of Arizona; Senator Jones, of
Washington; Senator Kenyon, of
Iowa; Senator Pomerene, of Ohio;
District Judge Arthur J. Tuttle, of De-
troit; Circuit Judge E. D. Kinne, of
Ann Arbor, and Hon. Franz C. Kuhn,
justice of the supreme court,who grad-
uated with Mr. Wedemeyer in 1894.
Pres. John J. Lentz and other officers
of the American Insurance Union, of
which Mr. Wedemeyer was a national
councilor, will also be present at the
services. The delegation of senators

and

representatives will leave Wash-
(Continued on page 4.)

From left to right-Moore, Blumrosen, and McElroy.

,..

RL-

Maybe you are a Scholar of the Genus Carcharodon=-in which case you had better drop this and continue with the discussion of the Enclitic QU
in Kickero, -but if "The Passing of the Horse" makes your heart jump as it does when you glance up from a Blue Book to see
a Prof. looking over your shoulder, if you would know "How to Pass though Ignorant" buy an
EXAM GARGOYLE
Out Todeay Ten Cents
"A Handy Compendtum of Illitt Infornxatfon.".~Press Dispatch.

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