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January 14, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-14

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I $2.50

C

Michigan

Daiy

Local $2.00
Mail $2.50

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C

_

MIINATIONS
E CAUSE OF-
ITHLETIC WAR
rs of Board of Directors
i When Legality of Petitions
For Interscholastic Job
i. Questioned.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Tuesday,
probability of light snows with in-
creasing temperature; moderate vari-
able winds.
University Observatory - Monday,
7:00 p. m., temperature, 23.8; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
27; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 7.2; average wind velocity,
4 miles per-hour.

ORIIIIA, /T)iES T
MlLl(ANFROM

MUS '
RACE; FAILS

In Order to Amend Matters, Decide to
Permit Other Candidates to
El!ter Contest.
Smoldering fires of a political nature
threatened to break into a lively blaze
at the meeting of the board of direct-
ors of the athletic association that
was held yesterday afternoon. The
meeting was called as a result of the
announcement of the nomination by
petition of two men for the office of'
interscholastic manager, which was
made late Saturday and without warn-
ing that the office was to be filled this
year.
Campus feeling, which gathered to
a head rapidly after it became known;
that the office was to be filled this
year when there was no definite assur-
ance that the interscholastic would be
held here, was responsible in no small'
measure for the calling of the meet-
ing. The sole question of debate was
that of the legality of the petitions;
but it was evident that the session
mneant a little mare- as it developed,
that the board was split into two fac-
' cns, both ;trying for the upper hand.
Want to give Fair Chance.
The constitution of the association
provides that all petitions for nom-
inations to offices that are to have
their nominees selected by this form
must be in one week before the elec-
tion. This would have masle the clos-
ing time kviday night at midnight.
However, the majority felt that as
school started only last Monday, and
the time for circulating petitions was
short at the most, it would be better
to override the constitution in order
to give all a fair chance to put up can-
didates. In fact this was unanimous-
ly agreed to'at the meeting last Thurs-
day, the board not knowing the techni-
calities of -the consyitution. However,
some of the members cf the board e-ri-
dently changed their minds in the
interim, espe'Aally after the campus
mutterings were heard regarding the
interscholastic nominations.
Upon a motion, which was carried by
a vote of three to two, the petitions
of the candidates for the prep schcol
meet managership wvere thrown out
At this juncture Director Bartelme
told the board that it would be rather
unwise not to elect a man for the office
as the meet was likely to come here
again. Accordingly the motion was
rescinded.
Try to Oust Other Nominees.
It was provided, however, that pe-
titions for this position might be re-
ceived up to Wednesday evening. This
is *unconstitutional but the major:t?
waived fine points for the sake of fair-
ness. This was exactly what the one
faction wanted. As far as could be as-
certained there is no sentiment on the
campus against the election of a man
to office but the whole bone of con-
tention lays in the fact that no publici-
ty of the proposed election for this jol
had been given out; whereas the rest
of the positions had been widely ad-
vertised.
Defeat seemed to go hard with the
opposition. Hardly had this last mo-
tion b: en j:ased by the three to two
vote, when th3 minority offered a mo-
tion to d- clare the nomination of Mor-
ris Milligan for football manager ille-
*al. It was alleged that Milligan's
nomination was unconstitutional as it
had been handed in by Captain Pater-
son 24 hours before the closing time,
whereas it should have been 48 hours
previous. Paterson, not knowing the
time requirements, kept his nomina-
tion, thus late in anticipation of more
men approaching him for an oppor-
tunity to run.
Hold Meeting Again Today.
In answer to this the majority came
forward with a bit of information that
threatened to deprive the ticket of any

*:
*;
*:
*
*.

* * * * * *: * *
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
Inasmuch as I knew nothing
about my petition to run for the
office of interscholastic manager
until I read of it in the Daily
Sunday morning, the nomination
being entirely. without my
knowledge or consent, and be-
cause I do not propose to be
mixed up in any of the "peanut"
politics on the campus, I here-
by withdraw my name from
consideration for such office.
(Signed)
CLAUDIUS C. 'PENDILL.
* * * * * * * *

WATCH THE WORM TURN
The entire campus, with the excep ion of a sma ll coterie of men on the
inside, was electrified to learn through the columnis of The Michigan Daily
on Sunday morning, that men had been nominated for the office of inter-
scholastic manager. In the first place it has not yet been announced to a
certainty that there will b- an interscholaistic here this, year. Secondly,
such an officer, in the past, has been elected at the f all elections. Thirdly,
and worst of all, NO OTHER MEN WERE' VIVEN A ('JANCE TO ENTER
THE RACE, BECAUSE NO INTIMATION HAD BEEN VlVEN THE CAMPUS
THAT ANY SUCH OFFICE WAS TO BE FILLED. The men nominated
were tipped off on the quiet, and their petitions were kept quiet until it be-"
came too late for any one else to ente °.
HOW LONG IS THE CAMPUS (I01Nt TO STAN!) FO1 TACTICS OF
THIS SORT?
We predict that the old maxim "that you can't fool all the people all the
time" is due for another demonstration of its truthfulness. Such methods
may be all right for Tammany Hall, but a college campus isn't New York.
City. The worm is due for a turning.
HOW ARETHESE METHODS EXPLAINED BY THOSE WHO EM-
PLOYED THEM?
Why, simply that anyone had a right to run for this office. But you or I
or the other fellow kIew nothing about ,it, and precautions were taken that
that information didn't get out. Yet, we're members of tlie athletic associa-
tio, and members of this university, and priumiably, at least, interested in
our right .
BACK OF ALL THIS IS THE Bl ISSUE THAT LIES BEHIND THE
COMING ELECTION OF THE ATHLETIC OFFICERS. WHEN YOU VOTE
AT THAT ELECTION YOU ARE NOT VOTINV, FROM THE STAND-POINT
OF IMPORTANCE, NEARLY AS MUCh AS FOR THE FUTURE INcUM-
BENT OF SOME MANAGERIAL OFlCE', AS YOU ARE FOR THE MEN
WHO WILL ULTIMATELY REPRESENT 'THIS STUI)ENT BOI)Y ON THE
IPPER B4OARI) IN CONTROL OF ATHLETICS. This is the main reason for
this attempt to sew up the intershiol stic berth.
IF YOU HAVE 3IICHIGAN AT hlRT, Mu. VOTER, ITS UP TO YOU
AS A MATTER OF I)UTY TO INTERROATE ThOSE WHo ARE RUN-
NINO FOR OFFICES IN THIS COMING ELECTION. ANIETrANSWERS
TO THE QUESTIONS INVOLVED.
THE MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL, ITS UP TO EVERY LAST MAN OF
YOU TO SHOW UP AT THE POLLS ON SATURDAY AND CAST IN-TELLI-
(ENT BALLOTS.
NOTED EDITOR IS DEBATERS CLASH'
ON CAMPUS TODAY FRIDAY EVENING
James Keeley, recognized as one of Michigan's varsity debating teams
the greatest authorities on the mod- meet Chicago and Norrhwestera uui-
ern newspaper, will deliver a lecture versities Friday evening in the annual
on "Newspaper Work" at 4:10 o'clock triangular debate of the Central De-

,nore inoninlation s for tlhis office
eiveu. (Signed)
R BERT MAALL, 13 .
JI. E. TIANCOCK, 11.31~

COMMUNICATIONS
Editor, The M:chigan Daily:-
We wish to formally protest against
the action of the athletic association In
accepting nominations for interseho-
lastic maiiager without notice of any
kind to members of the association.
We imisi t that an opportunity for

BURKE SHARTEL, '13L.
JIACOB L. CRANE, Jr., '13E.
.I. 1. LJPPENCOTT, '14.
PAUL REIGHARD, '11-'13L.
,EDWA RD C. KEMP, '12-'14L.

be

CAMPAIGNING
UNCOVERED IN
4COUNCIL RACE
Claiming Solicitation of Votes, .unior
Laws Enter Protest Against
Elections Held Rsy
Class Yesterday.
TIE OCCURS IN CONTEST OF
LITERARY REPRESENTATIVES
KoehlerI '13; Fletcher, '13E; Trum,
13E; Laidlaw, '13L, and Laurence,
'93M, Are Chosen.
Claiming that solicitation of votes
was practiced before the junior law
student council election yesterday af-
ternoon, Edward Kemp and Sylvan S.
Grossner, both menbers of the junior
law class, have sent a letter to the
tudent council protesting that the
election was illegal. The protest as-
serts that votes were solicited by
friends of both candidates. if the
ouncil does not allow the protest, W.
J. Laidaw who got more votes than
his opponent, G. C. Crismore will be
the new councilman for the law de-
partment. The protests will be con-
ridered at a meeting of the council to
be held tonight at 7:00 o'clock in the
oratorical rooms.
In the junior lit class election, Ar-
Chur Koehler was elected as one of
the new councilmen while Herbert
Wi!ins and Horace Maynard had tie
-otes for the other seat. Another
meeting of the class will be held this
afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in the west
Ephysics lecture room at which time the
names of these two men will be voted
upon to decide who will be the new
councilman.
Albert Fitcher and Herman J. Trum,
Jr., were elected as the new reprsen-
tatives to the council from the the
xhird year engineering class. In the
junior medic election, F. A. Laurence
was successful.
CORNELL NINE TO PLAY HERE.
.Another (amne Arringed in 11haca on
Annual Eastern Trip.
For the first time in the memory of
several generations of Michigan stu-
dents, Cornell will send a baseball
team to Ann Arbor to meet Michigan
on the diamond this spring. May 14
has beep. fixed as the date on which
the Ithacans will appear on Ferry
field, while on May 21 Michigan will
stop off at Ithaca for a game with
Cornell during the eastern trip of the
Maize and Blue nine.
A dispatch from Ithaca gave Michi-
gan students the first idea that Cor-
nell and Michigan would resume base-
ball relations again this season. This
dispatch was confirmed yesterday by
Director Bartelme. Michigan played
Cornell at Cornell during the 1911 sea-
son, but last year there was no game
arranged on Michigan's eastern trip,
for tite reason, it was stated, that the
two institutions could not agree on
dates.

this afternoon in room 202, West hall.1
Mr. Keeley was born in London. He
came to America in early life and
soon became identified with newspa-
per work. In 1898 he became associ-
ated with the Chicago Tribune and1
since that time has continuously been
connected with that publication. After1
several years of service as a member1
of the reportorial staff and an editori-7
al writer he rose to the position of;
general manager, an office he still1
holds. lHe is also vice-president of the3
Tribune publishing company.
Mr. Keeley has recently returned'
from Notre Dame where he has- had
charge of the installation of a school
of journalism. Although not a college
man himself, he has always been in-
terested in the attitude taken by uni-
versities in presenting the subject o'
journalism to their students.
This afternoon's lecture will be di-1
rected to the members of Prof. Scott's1
class in journalism but will be open to
ill who wish to attend. In the even-
ng Mr. Keeley will be the guest of
honor, as well as the princil:al speak-
er, at a dinner given to the staff o
The Michigan Daily at the Michigan
Union. Prof. F. N. Scott will preside
as toastmaster. Among the other,
;uests of the evening will be Pres.k
Harry B. Hutchins, Regent J. E. Beal,
and Prof. Wenley. This is the second
of a series of social events which have
been arranged for the members of the
staff, and will commence promptly at
6:00 o'clock.
JUNIOR WOMEN PLAN GIVING
SERIES OF THREE DINNERS.
Junior women will give the first of a
igan Union Saturday at 12:00 o'clock.
An informal musical program and
dancing will follow the luncheon. The
other two of the series will be held
March 1 and April 26.
Tickets for this series are on sale af
$1.40 and single admission is 50 cents.
Junior women who expect to attend
the function should procure tickets at
once from Phyllis Dunn, Julia Ander-
son, Helen Loman, Irene Bigalke, and
Mildred Taylor.
Heath Child Taken From Hospital.
Elizabeth Jane Heath, two-months
old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer
Heath, was removed to her home yes-
terday afternoon from Dr. Reuben Pet-
erson's private hospital. Her imme-
diate recovery is expected.

bating league. The Chicago negative
team appears in University Hall, while
Michigan's negative team meets North-
western at Evanston. The other
teams of the two other institutions -de-
bate the same evening in Chicago.
This year's question is, "Resolved,
that the form of banking reform pro-
posed by the National Monetary Com-
mission should be adopted by Con-
gress." The Michigan teams have
been practicing daily for the last
month, and will continue their prepa-
ration every evening this week until
Thursday, when they will be given a
rest.
The affirmative team is composed of
the following men: Paul B. B'anshard,
'14; L. S. Hulbert, '14L; B. J. Jonk-
man, '14L; and W. W. Schroeder, '14,
alternate. The negative team, which
goes to Evanston, is made up as fol-
lows: Sol Blumrosen, '13L; F. W.
Moore, graduate school; J. S. McElroy,
'13L; and E. W. McFarland, '13, alter-
nate.
BASKETBALL MEN LAY PLANS.

I

Nrifiins to Make Merry at A nnual Hop.
Criffins, messengers of the Gods,
will leave their stronghold on the
heights of Mount Olympus and gather
within the earthly portals of the Pack-
ard academy Wednesday hight for
their annual dance
EDWIN 0. MEAD
SPEAKS- ON UV.
WORLD POWER'
Vreat Peace Advocate Shows Import-
ant Part Played by American
Colleges 'in Training .
Young men.
STA TES THAT COSMOPOLITAN
CLUBS EFFECT GOOD RESULTS
Lecturer Refers to I)r. Angell Who He
Says is Authority on
Balkan Trouble.
Hon. Edwin D. Mead, one of the
world's greatest peace advocates,
spoke on "The United States as a
World Power" last night in University
Hall. His intimate relation to the
peace movement has made him the
master of his subject, and his talk was
interesting and informative. He
brought out the many instances where
the United States has led in matters
of world-wide interest.
tie spoke especially of the import-
ant part played by American univer-
sities in training young men of other
countries. He referred to Robert Col-
Lege in Constantinople where so many
of the young Bulgarian leaders have
been trained He also referred to the
very important influence the univer-
sities of this country have had on the
recent phenominal development of Chi-
na. More than half of the men in the
cabinets and councils of the new Chi-
nese republic have had their training
in American universities.
"The largest and most important
cosmopolitan club in theworld is the
United States of America," he said
"There is nothing more important in
he universities and colleges today
than this cosmopolitan club movement
in which the club of your university
has played such an important part."
About 400 attended the lecture, in-
cluding Dr. Angell, to whom Mr. Mead
referred several times in connection
with his familiarity with the Balkan
situation.
JANIARY LAW REVIEW HAS
ARTICLE BY S. S. GREGORY
S. S. Gregory, president of the
American Bar association last year
furnishes the principal article in the
January number of the Michigan Law
Review. His contribution is an address
which was delivered before the Indi-
ana State Bar association last July.,
entitled "A Historic Judicial Contro-
versy and Some Reflections Suggested
by It."
The question of directing a verdict
for the party having the burden of
proof is discussed by Prof. E. R. Sun-
derland. The second paper of a series
on "Bank Deposits and Collections" is
the work of R. J. Baker, of Philadel-
phia. Student comment on important
cases recently decided, and an alumni
legal directory complete the issue.

FINE POSTERS
SUBMITTED IN
OPERA CONTEST
Entries Were Closed La"t Night and
Big Collection o; Drawings
W1ill be 1ludged by
Faculty Men.
PRO FESSiONA L IN STRUCTOR TO
f RILL AND TRAIN IANCERS.
Musical Numbers Have Been Selected
by Those in Charge of
Competition.
When the Michigan Union opera pos-
ter contest closed at 6:00 o'cock last
evening, 13 drawings had been sub-
mitted. Nothing unlucky is expected
to happen as a result of the number
of entries reaching an even baker's
dozen-indeed, judging from the ap-
pearance of most of the productions,
this year's opera will be advertised
with the best poster ever used.
Of the 13 drawings handed in, at
least three were equal to professional
work, according to the committee in
harge of the competition, There was
just one dozen 'posters entered in the
contest last year. Although a number
of exceptionally creditable efforts
were received for the 1911 show, it is
said that the sketches submitted yes-
terday were even better. A commit-
tee of faculty judges will award the
prize for the mnost meritorious con-
tributiou later in the week.
Nearly all ,fhe music for the opera
has been picked, by the men in charge
of that competition, Prof. Wm. How-
land, Prof. A. A. Stanley, $elden Dick-
enson, '13, and Earle Moore, '12. The
three men who have had musical con-
tributions accepted are: Wil'is A.Diek-
ema, '14, Rowland Fixel, '14L,,and K.
C. 'Haven. The show will include 11
songs, besides the opening and closing
chotuses.
Arrangements have. been made to
ngage a professional dancing instruc-
tor to drill the "show girls," when
work is begun in earnest after exami-
rations. The general chairman, Phil-
p K. Fletcher, '13E, is in communica-
tion with such a man in Detroit, .ree-
->mmended by Bert St. John, and if
satisfactory arrangements can be
nade, he will be brought to Ann Ar-
bor to put the finishing touches on
the terpsichorean parts of the per-

4clhdule of Practice Hours Given Out
by Manager Gilbert,
Beginning tonight the regular sched-
ule of practice hours for the inter-
class basketball teams will go into
effect. At a meeting cf the class man-
agers called last evening by Inter-
class manager Thomas Gilbert, the
following schedule was adopted:
Tuesday: '15 lit-7:00; '15 law-
7:30; '15 eng.-7:45.
Wednesday: '16 dent-7:00; '16 lit
-7:15; '16 eng.-7:30; '16 medics-
7:45.
Thursday: '13 eng.--7:00; '13 lit.-
7:30; '13 law-7:45.
Friday: '14 law-7:00; '14 med.-
7:15; '14 eng.--7:36; '14 lit.-7:45.
According to Manager Gilbert, this
schedule will stand each week with
the exception of two weeks of exami-
nations, until the opening of the sea-
son late in February. Gilbert states
that teams may share their time with
each other as has been done in other
years, but that it will be necessary
for a team to have five men on the
floor in order to hold their alloted
timc.
Cosmopolitan Club Pins are Received.
A shipment of the new pins of the
Michigan chapter of the Corda-Fra-
tres Association clubs has just been
received,

ormance.
Mr. St. John will ba in the city the
'ast of the week to make final prepa-
rations for the "business" of the show
and the apportionment of the various
choruses will be decided.
UNION MEMERSHIP DINNER
OFFERS PROMISING PROGRA,1I
Prof. R. M. Wenley will be the prin-
;ipal speaker at the Michigan Union
'nembership dinner Thursday evening,
and Harold S. Hulburt, '14M, will be
:n the program with a talk on the
prospects of the new Huron river arti-
ficial lake. The musical portion of the
entertainment will be furnished by
Henry Dotterweich and Anthony Whit-
nire of the School of Music.
Tickets for the dinner are on sale
Itt the Union. The pasteboards sell
'or 40 cents, and inasmuch as the at-
:endance at the former membersip af-
fairs this year has been record-mak-
ing, it is expected that the entire block
of admission cards will be disposed of
before Thursday evening.
SDean Vaughan to Lecture in West.
Dean V. C. Vaughan of the medical
lepartment left yesterday afternoon
for Wisconsin where he is to deliver
his lecture on "Eugenics or Race
Betterment" before a university audi-
ence this evening. From there he will
go to the University of Minnesota
where he will repeat the lecture Wed-
nesday evening.
Commerce Club to Dance Next Week,
Members of the Commerce club'will
dance next Tuesday evening at the
Packard academy. A number of fea-
tures relating to the affairs of the club
will be introduced. Chaperones for
the evening will be Professors David
Friday, Henry C. Adams and Edward
D. Jones.

'A

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