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January 12, 1913 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday Supplement

very Sunday Edition
of the PaperI

The

Michigan

ally

... ..

I

Special Features, Exchanges
and Church Notices

I

I

d

i

copal Theological School
CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
cation offers unequalled oppor-
for grraduate work at Harvard
rsity. For catalogue address
HIOD ES.
EORGE BISCHOFF
Florist .
ICE CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS
Chapin St. Both Phones
IITARIAN CHURCH

MICHIGAWS OBSERVATORY RANKS AMONG
THE THREE FOREMOST IN TI
For Imore than 50 years the uni- Brunnow was in charge most of the to the equip
yersity observatory has played an im- time for the next ten years when he Washington

HE COUNTRY
pment.: On being called to
as first Chief of the
ureau, Professor Harring-

BUSINESS DIR ECTORY
'HERE HAS BEEN DEMAND ON PART OF THE MICHIGAN NDAILY
READERS FOR . BUSINESS DIRECTORY WHICH WOULD REFER THEN
To RELIABLE BOARDING HOUSES, REAL ESTATE FIRMS, INS(:R.
A NtE AND PROFESSIONAL OFFICES, ETC. THE DAILY GIVES BE-
LOW A LIST OF SUCH RECOGNIZED FIRMS. THIS DIRECTORY WILL
A PI"IAll EVERY SUiNIXY.

State cor. Huron.

R. S. LORIC, Minister
nORNINC SERVICE AT 10:30
Subject:
SEEING THE WORLD
oung Peoples' Society at 7t
Siblect:,
e at Hackley, an Eastern Preparatory
School

portant part in the development of
the University of Michigan. Started
back in the early 50's by President
Tappan, who realized the need of a
course in astronomy, it has steadily
grown until at present it ranks among
the three largest observatories in the
United States, with Harvard in the
east and Lick in the west.
Soon' after it was decided to erect
an observatory, influential Detroit
friends raised $7,000, and the building
when completed became known as the
Detroit Observatory in honor of those
who had made it possible. The $7,000,
however, covered only part of the
total expense, so the regents appro-
priated $15,000 in order to make a
satisfactory building. Subsequently,
the citizens of Ann Arbor contributed
$2,500, and those of Detroit $3,000 for
needed improvements.
In the same year, 1853, Dr. Tappan
was fortunate in securing Dr. Francis
Brunnow, of Berlin, to become the
first director of the new course. Dr.

returned to Europe to continue his
astronomical work. He was one of
the small number of the men who at
that early time gave the university
a high standard for scientific instruc-
tion.
Prof. James C. Watson, '57, became
director in 1863, and continued until
1879, during which period he did the
then unprecedented feat of discover-
ing no less than 22 planets. 'the
series of charts worked out by him as
a result of these discoveries have since
proved to be some c the most valu-
able of the kind published, as they
have aided in the discovery of many
minor planets. He was a computor of
remarkable skill, and an author on
astronomical subjects of considerable
note.
Upon the resignation of Professor
Watson, Prof. Mark Harrington, '68,
was, elected to fill the vacancy. Fa-
cilities for student study were mater-
ially increased under his direction,
several new instruments being added

ton loft Prof. Wm. J. Hussey in ten-
poriry charge of the work.
The present director, Professor Hus-
sey, who for nine and a halt years had
been at the, Lick observatory, began
his duties in 1905. under his direc-
tion, the equipment of the department
has been considerably improved, new
instruments have been added, better
and larger telescopes erected, and the
general standard of the ivork has
been raised. lie supervised the con-
struction of the present large reflect-
ing telescope, and since his appoint-
ment a new building has been adder:
to the original observatory, and many
other beneficial changes made. Prof.
Hussey, with the asistance of Prof.
R. H. Curtiss, has been instrumental
in making the observatory stand as
high as it does today, holding an en-
viable position among those of this
country.
The University of Michigan was one
of the first in the United States to give

10A1RDNG HOUSES
RESTAURANT
331 South Maii St.
Regular Dinner 25c
Lunches. Home-made Pies.
Chicken Dinner every Sunday.
CAMPUS CAFE
Why not board at a real Boarding
House?
!Meals like those at home.
miie to 9 1ir. Uidi-ersity a1d b
C1 32'iiiCe~l.
110-1E COOKI') (
For small tables and good srvice go
to 6,lIE EN'S BOAR)ING HOUSE
Phone 991-J.

If you want to rent a
If you want insurance,

Vat or house.
the best of all
Phone 1612.

kinds.
312 National

Weather BTu

fank Blk.

FOR RENT
WARREN AGENCY
has at all times Special Bargains in
desirable places for sale or rent.
Life, Accident and Fire Insurance.
We solicit correspondence or calls,
and promise our best efforts.
L. D. CARR
Real Estate Agent
17 Savings Bank Block.. Phone 141.
Specialty-residence property, houses
for sororities and fraternities.

REAL ESTATE AND INSUhtANCE
WARREN H. SMITH is the man

Speaker
Mr. J. L. RICHARbS

I

IVA04\TER AGENCY

m

104 N. Fourth Ave.

Bell 6601-J.I

Write Ideas

For

Moving

Picture

Plays!

Real Estate, Life, Fire, Accident
Insurance.

You

CAN WRITE PHOTO PLAYS AND
EARN $25 OR MORE WEEKLY

We Will Show

You How!

I

If you have ideas-if you can THINK-we will shew you l e
secrets of this fascinating new piofession. Positively no exj erier-ce
or literary excel'ence necessary., No "flowery language" is wanted.
The demand for photoplays is practically unljn itu l. 'l le big
film manufacturers are moving "heaven and earth" in tie r at-
tempts to get enough gcod plots to suy ply the ever increasing de-
mand. They are offering $too and more, for single scenarios, or
written ideas.
Nearly all the big film companies, the buyers of photoplays,
are located in or near NEW YORK CITY. Being right on the spot
and knowing at all times just what sort of plots are wanted by tlhe
producers, our SALES DIPARTMENT has a tremendous advant-
age over agen-ies situated in distant cities,
We have received many lette rs frcm the big film manufactur-
ers, such as Vitagraph, Edison. Essanay, Lubin, Solax, Imp, Re-
liance. Champion, Comet, Melics, Etc., urging us to send photo-
plays to them. We want more writers and we 11 gladly teach you
the secrts Of success.
We are selling photoplays written by people
who''1cver before wrote a line of publication,"
.Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only
one good idea each we-k, and will write it out as directed by us,
and it sells for only $25. a low figure,
You Will Earn $100, Monthly For Spare lime Work
Send your name and address at once for free copy of
our illustrated book, "MOVING PICTURE PLAYWRITING."
Don't hesita'e. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what
this new profession may wean for you ard your future.

advance instruction in theoretical and
practical astronomy. As a result of
this policy, extending over a period'
of more than fifty years, many im-
port ant 1ositions have been filled by
those- who have studied here, and the
work done by these men and by the
students, has had a wide influence on
the development of astronomy in
America.
In 1911 Prof. Hussey was appointed
director of the observatory at La
Plata, Argentina, retaining also the
directorship of the Detroit observa-
tory; and he is at present engaged in
research work in South America.
During his absence Prof. R. H. Cur-
tiss has charge oi the work here.
The equipment of the local observa-
tory is modern and almost complete.
Constant additions are being made to
it from time to time with the idea
of keeping all the facilities for study
the best that can be obetined.
In the beginning, it was the inten-
tion to buy a large telescope and prs-
vide a building for it, but the liberal-
ity of the citizens of Detroit soon made
it evident that the plan could be ex-
tended to include what was then re-
garded as the equipment of a com-
plete observatory.
The telescope procured was the first
large telescope constructed entirely
in the United States, and was at that
time the third largest in the world,
haying an aperture of 24, inches, and
a focal length of 200 inches. Ccsting
$6,000, it was of such a high grade
that it was in constant use until 1911.
at which time the present instrument
was installed,
In June, 1906, the board of regents
set aside $15,000 as an initial appro-
priation toward the construction of a
large reflecting telescope, adopting
the plan of having the instrument de-
signed at the observatory and as large-
ly as possible constructed in the ob-

details of the spectroscopic and elec-
trical equipment in connection with
it were planned by Prof. R. H. Curtiss,
and the success of the instrument in
this respect is due to him. There was
also a four-inch telescope known as a
comet-seeker, used extensively by the
students for practical instruction, but
this was superseded in 1908 by a much
larger instrument which has been in
use since.
In 1854 a meridian circle was added
to the equipment. This has an ob-
jective of 6.2 inches, and has been
much used since its acquisition.
There is also a separate building con-
taining material for the exclusive use
of students of astronomy, known as
the students' observatory. This is
kept up-to-date as far as possible, for
practical study. M
Until recently the grounds belong-
ing to the observatory covered about
four acres; but a few years ago Rob-
ert Lamont donated 26 acres to the
use of the department. -This, together
with the modern building itself, is
worth many thousands of dollars. The
present main building, completed in
1911, contains the two large tele-
scopes, offices, class, and storage
rooms.
At the observatory there are several
delicate clocks, used in ascertaining
the time which is used in the dock of
the general library which,. contrary
to general opinion, is always within a
few seconds of the correct time.
Seismographic instruments register
disturbances of the earth, and locate
approximately the position of the dis-
position of the disturbance.

NA TIONAL A UTHORS'

1543 Broadway
New York City

servatory and engineering shops. Ad-
ditional appropriations were made
from time to time, until, upon the
completion of the telescope in 1911,
there had been expended upon it and
accessories, an aggregate of $24,000.
This instrument, having a diameter of
3712 inches, is one of the largest of the
kind in existence, and is used only for
special work, being driven by a
specially arranged clock to keep it in
exact position in relation to the move-
ments of the bodies studied. All the

IHISTORIC ROOMS WORTH KNOWING
U nion Lounging Room,
If walls had ears to hear and lips
to speak, what strange and interest-
ing stories we might listen to! Im-
agination is capable of making such
a condition almost possible if we will
but let- it. Where? Everywhera; but
one of the best places would be in
the familiar lounging room of the
Michigan Union club house.
To you it has always been just the
"Union," but to many citizens of Ann
Arbor and to many older faculty mem-
bers that building is a constant re-
minder of one. of Michigan's grand

INS TITUTE

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k

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Latest Colors in MICHICAN
Bennannts
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dEadting3

&

itlalteaux

A Complete Assortment of

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Headquarters for DEN

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11

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