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January 11, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-11

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Local $2.00
Mail $2.50

Th~e

Nlichigan

Daily

I Local $2.00
flail $2.50

VIJI. .&TVTTTLi. i6 N ROR IHGN STRAJNUR i 93

Vol, XXltl, NO. 73.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1913.

PRICE FIVE G

w a T an %.

NOMINATION
FOR FOOTBALL
MANAGER MADE
Morris _. Iilligan, '14, Only Nominee
for Office of 1913 Var-
wity Football Man.
ager.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for. Ann Arbor-Saturday,
cloudy and some snow with about sta-
tionary temperature; moderate north-
westerly winds.
University Observatory-Friday, 7:00
p. m., temperature, 32.8; maximum
temperature, 24 hours preceding, 33.4;
minimum temperature, 24 hours pre-
ceding, 17.4; average wind velocity, 8
miles per hour.

I:FELLOWSHIPS 0FFEREI WOWEN l)EAN V.W((HAN ADDRESSES THE
BY BALTI WORE ASSO('ATiN. STUDENT BOY ON "EUGENICS."
The Baltimore association for the Sarah Caswell Angell hall was
promotion of the university education crowvded to its utmost capacity last
of women has notified the universiy ni ght to hear' Dean V. C. Vaughan, of
of its fellowship of $500 available for
study at any American or European the medical department, deliver a lec-
university. Preference among cand-I tur on "Eugenics" or "Race Better-
dates is given to women from Mary- inent." Dr. Vaughan said in part:
land and the south, but the only re- "What an individual is or ought to be'
quirement is that candidates must is often very largely dependent upon
have done one or two years graduate the traits that he has inherited from
work. All applications for the fel- his ancestors and the environment in
lowship must be mailed to Dr. Mary which he lives. These traits are not
Sherwcod, the Arundel, Baltimore, always manifested physically, but
tsd., by March 15. mn etally as well. Some of the traits
--are racessive, howevee, and tend to
Chinese Studet:s Choose Officers. disappear after a time. The bad traits,
At the regular meeting of the Chin- insanity, feeblemindedness, alcoholism

I

'oN ELED 1FOR STERN SENIORS CELEBRATE
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18. SOCIAL STUNTS TODAY.
Coeietilioni for the Offices of Finan. The gala event in senior lit social
6ii Secrelary and Treasurer
is Certain. activities for the year will be.held to-
day in the form or a combined lunch-
Captain '"Bubbles" Paterson nomi- eon and dance at the Michigan Union.
nated only one man for the 1913 varsi- -The luncheon will begin at 12:00
.- o'clock and dancing will start at 2:00
ty football manager, the nominee was o'clock and last until 5:30. Tickets
Morris A. Milligan, '14, former inter- are being sold rapidly and it is ex-
class football manager. The nomina- pected that the greater portion of the
tion came as a result of the efficient f class will be in attendance.

work of Milligan in guiding the class
teams last fall together with the'fact
that no other candidates were prom-
inently available.
All nominations will close this even-
ing at 6:00 o'clock, so petitions must
be in before this hour in order to have
the names appear upon the ballot, Sat-
urday, January 18, when the annual
election will be held. The polls will
be open from 9:00 to 1:00 o'clock and
instead of identifying voters by mem-
bership cards, all voters will be re-
quired to present their athletic ticket
book, and event coupon number 12 will
entitle each man to cast a ballot.
Louis Haller, '11, '14L, presented a
petition signed by the required 75
members to have his name appear as
a nominee for secretary and the peti-
tion was granted. This makes the
nominees for offices line up as follows:
football manager, Morris A. Milligan,
'14; Secretary, R. Renville Wheat, '14,
and Louis Haller, '11, '14L; treasurer,
Albert Fletcher, '14E.
There is a rumor to the effect that
a :Petition will be presented before
6:0) o'clock for another man to run
against Fletcher for the scribe job.
This will make a. total of five names
to appear on the ballot next Saturday
unless more petitions appear before
the eleventh hour.
Noted Author-Grad Visits City.
Donal Haines, a Michigan man
who has made his name famous in the
world of letters, is spending a- week
in the city as the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Roy Dickinson Welch.

Prof. W. R. Humphreys and Prof.
J. A. C. Hildner will be the faculty
speakers. Harold Abbott, Elaine
Shields, Clem Quinn, Ruth Davis and
Rolfe Spinning will also give short
talks.
It is requested that everyone come
singly and a unique system for get-
ting acquainted has been arranged.
An elaborate program will be present-
ed and many feature dances have been
provided for. The music for the oc-
casion will be given by "Ike" Fischer.
Those who have not as yet secured
tickets may obtain them at the door
for 50 cents.
FRESH LIT STUDENT DIES
AS RESULT OF OPERATION.
Walton M. Goode, '16, died at his
home in Port Sheridan, Ill., Sunday.
January 5, as the result of an opera-
tion for appendicitis. Goode left Ann
Arbor for his vacation in apparently
good health but was taken critically
ill Christmas day. He was a member
of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity and
was popular among his class-mates.
Women to Hear Dr. Knepper Soon..
Dr. George Knepper, pastor of the
Christian church, will speak to the
women of the university at Newberry
hall at the regular meeting Tuesday
afternoon at 4:00 o'clock on "Things
Fundamental." As yet no additional
-program has been arranged.
Oratory Head Presides at Evanston.
Professsor T. C. Trueblood of the

ese Students' club last night, the fol-
lowing officers were elected for the
remaining part of the school year:
President, 1. .H. Si; Vice-President, V.
T. Maw; Recording-Secretary, S. H.
Kee; Corresponding-Secretary, C. P.
Wang; Treasurer, P. H. Chen: and
Auditor, T. F. Chen.
PEACE ADVOCATE
TO LECTURE HERE
E. 1). 3read, Head of The World-Peace
Foundation Scheduled
For Monday.
E DITOR OF SEVERIAL P MPHLETS
Edwin D. Mead, who lectures here
Monday, is the managing director of
the World Peace Foundation, of which
President-emeritus James B. Angell is
a member of the advisory council. He
is the most active advocate of interna-
tional peace, spending a large portion4
of his time lecturing in the interest of
the cause.
In addition to his lecturing engage-
ments, Mead edits the International
Library and the Old South Leaflets
and Studles in History as well as serve
ing as an officer of both the interna-
tional an'd American peace societies,
His scholarly attainments, together
with his charm as a public speaker,
give his addresses a most entertaining
character.
The World Peace Foundation is
closely connected with the Lake Mo-
honk Arbitration Conference, wherej
the national peace oratorical contest
is held. This is the contest won, by
Percival V. Blanshard, '11, last year,
who was recently awarded a Rhodes
scholarship, and whose brother Paul,
will represent Michigan in the peace
contests this year.
I)ean Schlotterlbeck Ref turns for a IPay
Dean J. O. Schlotterbeck of the
pharmacy department, who is taking
a leave of absence for one year, and is
installing a laboratory ot Rochester,
N. Y., was here on business yester-
day.
\ ppoint Grad Examining Psychologist
Nellie L. Perkins, 12, has been ap-
pointed examining psychologist for the
coming summer months at the Indiana
State Home for the Feeble-minded.For
the past year Miss Perkins has held
a fellowship at the University of Chi-
cago.

and criminality are said to be inherit-
able, though it is still a question
whether or not alcoholism in a parent
leads to th feeblemindeln-ss in the
offspring'."
Dr. Vaughan will deliver this same
lecture to University of Wisconsin
and Minnesota audiences next week.
KNIGHTS OF MAT
TO HOLD TOURNEY
Plas for W11r estling Tournament to be
held Early Next Semester
Nearly Ready.
CLOSE IOMIPiETITION IS PROMISED
\\restling makes its first move on
the checkerboard of indocr sports, the
third week after the start of the new
semester, hiut already extensive plans
are being put under way for the hold-
ing of the annual tournament in Wat-
erman gymnasium. Dr. G.A. May, who
as director of the gymnasium was in-
strumental in fathering the plans, has
announced that cups will be put up
to furnish added incentive to thos,,
who would win t ampus fame oa the
mat. The utive work of arrange-
ments has be'n placed in the hands of
J. C. Peterson, '13. .
It was decided' yesterday by Dr.
MAy and Poterson that there was
no partieular or urgent reason for the
holding of a general meeting as pre-
vious!y announced.. Instead of the de-
tails of bouts being explained in meet-
ing, a poster has been' placed in the
gym wrestling room which sets forth
the rules and weights which will gov-
ern this winter's tournament. The
contenders will be divided into four
classes on the grounds of weight. The
first class will be for the light-weights,
there being no under limit and the
upper standing at 133 pounds. Next
will be the welter-weights with an up-
per limit of 145 pounds. Then comes
the middle-weights with an upper lim-
it of 145 pounds. Then come the mid-
dle-weights who must top not less
than 158 pounds on the scales, and
above this figure will be the fourth
class, the heavy-weights. The only
requirement for this class is that the
subject weigh in above 158 pounds,
the upper limit being removed. The
bouts will be wrestled under the Amer-
ican amateur rules, and it is under-
stood that Dr. May will act as refer-
ee.

PROGRAM OF "CHINESE NIGHT"
TO BE AN UNUAL OFFERING
Purely Oriental ;Entertainment Gives
Promise of Many New
Features.
With a program unequalled at any
previous event of that nature, the
"Chinese Night" to be given at New-
berry hall this evening will doubtless
be a record-breaker.
A playlet written and to be produc-
ed especially for the occasion is prom-
ised with an exceptional oriental cast
and a stage environment of magnifi-
cence. One of the Chinese women in
the university will take part. Many
features of unusual interest will be
introduced in picturesque scenes.
An illustrated lecture on the Chin-
ese revolution will be given for the
first time before a public audience. An
instrumental quartet will furnish
some Chinese music. The shuttle-
cock dance-a common game in Chin-
ese schools-and slight-of-hand will
be featured.
The house will be open at 7:30 and
an informal reception in the parlors
precedes the regular program which
begins at 8:00 o'clock. It is expected
that the hall will be crowded to the
limit. Purely Chinese refreshment
will be served. The affair is open to
the public, and the entire program
will be free of charge.
DEAN UTHE IS ELECTED AN
EDITOR ON PHYSICAL REVIEW
Dean Karl Guthe, of the graduate
department, wes recently elected a
member of the board of editors of the
"Physical Review," a monthly publi-
cation devoted to research work in
physics. The magazine, formerly pub-
lished by Cornell University, will in
the future be printed by the physical1
society, of which Dean Guthe is a1
member of the council.
Prof. Goddard Lectures on Course.k
"The Trained Man" is the title of ant
address to be delivered by Prof. E. C.1
Goddard at Centerville this evening.
This is a regular number on the uni-
versity extension lecture course.
F'OIIt CLASSES TO NOMINA TE
STUIDENT COUNCILMEN TODAYi
Four classes, junior lits, engineers,
laws and medics will nominate men
for student council positions at meet-
ings to be held today. Time and place
for the meetings are to be found in the
University Notices in another columnt
of this issue.l

ENROLLMENT
AT MICIA
Registrar of Columbia University
Compiles Statistics That
Place Michigan
Second.
FIGURES ARE BASED ON FAIL
ATTENDANCE AND NO ) TAL
Columbia Tops All With Over 9,00 )
Students; a Gain of 1,000 in
One Year.
Michigan ranks second among the
universities of the country in enroll-
ment exclusive of the summer ses-
sion, and fifth including it, according
to figures compiled by Registrar Ru-
dolf Tombo, of Columbia University,
on the twenty-nine leading American
universities, and appearing in a recent
number of Science. Columbia with
6,153 students leads Michigan's 4,923
in fall attendance, and the Wolverine
school's total registration of 5,620 was
surpassed by Columbia with 9,007, Cal-
ifornia 6,457, Chicago 6,351, and Har-
vard 5,729.
In the fall of 1911 the order of the
universities, exclusive of summer ses-
sion, was Columbia first, Cornell sec-
ond, Michigan, third, Harvard fourth,
and Pennsylvania fifth. Five other uni-
versities have more than 4,000 students
in fall attendance and are Harvard
with 4,828, California 4,721, Cornell
4,605, Pennsylvania 4,290, and New
York University 4,063. The largest
gains in this registration were made
by Indiana with 990, Chicago 700, Cali-
fornia 690, and Columbia 484.
There are three other universities
with a total enrollment of more than
5,000, namely Cornell with 5,412, Wis-
consin 5,141 and Minnesota 5,063. The
largest gains including the summer
sessions were reported by Columbia
with an increase of 1,069, California
733, Minnesota 515 and New York
University 488. Five show a loss in
total registration and are Cornell, Ill-
inois, Iowa, Johns Hopkins and Penn-
.ylvania, while there were only four
in 1911 and three in 1910.
The enrollment of the different uni-
versities including summer session
are as follows:

- _ - oratory department was elected pre-
Pres> J itefhilu to Speak Sunday. siding officer for the year by the pub-
President Harry B. Hutchins will tic speaking conference which met
speak at the union service to be held at Evanston December 27 and 28.
Sunday evenin ' at the St. Andrews Last night Pdofessor Trueblood
church at 7:45. "The Gospel of Ser- gave a recital of Julius Caesar at Bat-
vice," will be Pres. Hutchins' subje-t tle Creek on the university extension
and the public is invited to attend. lecture course.

t

PERFIDIOUS STAIRS
SLIP ONE OVER
Students in economics are facing a Someone has been handin the
far weightier problem these days than walking elevator a little dope. Ex-
that of the City of New York. Indeed perts are divided as to whether it is
the deductive powers and criminal soap or grease but no one, who has
catching eyes of William J. Burns walked down, denies the fact that
could very well be called into play. there is at present a "banana skin"
And its all because the malefactor who surface on the stairs. Consequently
put the slip in the stairs of the hall there have been daily catastrophes.
where "marginal costs" are taught It is rather amusing, when the spec-
must 'be captured ere there is a fatali- 'tator is on terra firma, to see a pair
ty. of heels fly up, hear a bump-bump-
For the past two or three days the bump and then see a fellow student
students, who have classes on the sec- ; sitting ruefully at the bottom of the
ond floor of the structure, have lived stairs. This is especially funny if he,
in a .,ate of constant terror. There or she, fails to smile.
isn't the shii htest danger of the floor From the other point of view, rath-
caving in cr of the roof falling about er point of fall, it is not so laughable.
their heads but there is a grave chance Furthermore, it is hard on the cloth-
in descending the stairs. ing to say nothing of the constitution.

- ----------- 'Close competition is bound to de-
1. E. Heineman to Address 'raftsmen velop in. some of the bouts, especially
At the regular meeting of the Crafts- in the light-weight evcnts as the chain-
men tonight David E. Heineman, of pion of last year is still in school and
Detroit, will speak on "A Backward his disgruntled opponents are anxious
ook in Masonry." A report of the for the chance to gain redemption.
lance committee will be made -at the There is plenty of heavy-weight ma-
meeting. terial, this class usually being the
---------- largcst in point of numbers. In the
Condition of Xiamtin Judy Improving. two intervening weights, some are
The condition of Martin Judy, '13M, now trying to decide whether they
who has been suffering for the past will fatten up for the middle-weight
three weeks from an attack 1 or work off a little fat and enter into
of blood poisonin, was reported yes the light-weight c mpetition, Entries
terday as improved. He was able to for the tournament should be made
take more nourishment and had a immediately, either with Dr. May or
lower temperature. Peterson the student representative.

Reed Called Home by Death of Sister.
Norman W. Reed, '13L, was called
to London, Ont., Wednesday after-
noon by a telegram stating that his
sister had died. Reed had just re-
turned from his holidays and when he
left home, his sister was in the best
of health. It is expected that he will
return to college.
Forestry Club Gives Successful Dance
More than fifty couples attended the
forestry club dance held in Packard
Academy last night. This was the
first affair of the kind ever attempted
by the club and the members were
much pleased with the success of the
dance. The chaperones were Profes-
sor and Mrs. Filibert Roth and Mr. and
Mrs. L. J. Young. The music was
furnished by "Ike" Fischer and sever-
al interesting features were introduc-
ed.
Engineer Grad Pays Short Visit Here,.
Howard Sterns, a 1911 graduate in
engineering, is in Ann Arbor for a few
days to renew old acquaintances. Mr.
Sterns has been in the employ of the
Westinghouse Electric Company since
leaving college, and is now teaching
in the industrial school conducted by
the company.

i
t
t
1
I

Columbia........
California.......
Chicago.........
Harvard ..........
Michigan .........
Cornell ...........
Wisconsin ........
Minnesota.........
Pennsylvania ... .

New York University....4543 4055
Illinois ................4315 4929
Northwestern...........3632 3438
Ohio State............3608 3567
Syracuse ..............3529 3307
Yale ................3265- 3224
Texas................3016 2539
Missouri ................2871 2780
Nebraska............2811
Kansas...............2403 2265
Tulane...............2249 2040
Indiana .............. ..2234 2154
Iowa................1944 1967
Pittsburgh ........ ....1833'
Stanford ................1670 1648
Princeton.............1568 1543
Western Reserve .........1378 1331
Tohns Hopkins.. ......1087 1238
Columbia had the largest summer
session with 3,602 in attendance and.
Chicago was second with 3,531. Cali-
fornia followed with a registration of
2,275, Wisconsin fourth with 1,741 and
Michigan fifth with 1,324. Only four
other universities reported more than
1,000 and are Cornell, 1,307, Indiana
(Continued on page 4.)

1912:
.. 9007
6457
..6351
..5729
:.....5620
..5412
..5141
..5063
.... 4843

1911
7938
5724
6062
5426
5452
5609
5015
4548
5220

Future Indefinite

Present Perfect

Past Definite

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STUDENT DIRECTORY

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