100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sul

N4

For

1

le

Michigan Daily

lAILED T,
ADDRESS

qo. 7.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9,;1912.

PRICE

Y RUNS

I THE WEATHER MAN

r

.l
nID

I

Foreenst for Ann Arbor-Unsettled
weather with rain tonight and Wed-
nesday. Warmer Wednesday.
University Obseri-atory-Tuesday
7 p. m. temperature, 46.4; maximum
temperature 57.4; minimum tempera-
ture, .36; rainfall, .34; average wind
velocity, 2 miles.

MAY NOT LET
WOMEN VOTE
OMANAGERS
PROBLEM RAISED AS TO WHETH-
ER WOMAN STUDENTS MAY BAL-
LOT THIS WEEK IN MANAGERIAL
ELECTIONS.

SOLICIT UNION
MEMBERSHIPS'
THISEVENING
C(N3ITTEEME N ARRANGE COM-
PLETE CANVASS OF CITY START-
ING THIS EVENING. WANT TO
RE.ACII 2,PX) MARK.

TTER

pecially Strong
'nish Good

y sprink-
s J. Plu-
;e yester-
sity was

EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE MEETS
Members of Union Bureau Expected to
Report on Canvass Tonight.
Men on the Michigan Union employ-
men committee will give a report of
their canvass at 7:00 o'clock this even-
ing at the Union. At a meeting of
the committee last week, each member
was assigned to cover a certain sec-
tion of the city in search of jobs for
university men.
Information concerning all kinds of
positions found will be filed at the Un-
ion, and anyone who wishes. to obtain
work may apply at the club-house any
day from 4:00 to 5:00 o'clock. Those'
members of the committee who were
not assigned territory must also re-
port at the meeting tonight.

TO DECIDE MATTER TODAY;MEMBERSHIP IS NOW 1740;

MIS HU BARI) LIKES MICHIGIN.
Daughter of East AuroraILPhilosop~er
Preparing to Ean Livelihood.
One of the most interesting members
of this year's freshman class is Mliri-
am Hubbard, daughter of Elbert Hub-
bard, the well-known writer and phil-
osopher.
Miss Hubbard has come all the way
from East Aurora, N. Y., to enter Mich-
igan, because, as she says, she and
her father both believe that this uni-
versity is the best institution of its
kind in the country. They approve of
Michigan's democracy, and her policy
of breaking away from the hard and
fast conventions of the East, enough
to accept on trial new and advanced
ideas.
Miss Hubbard is a staunch advocate
of co-education. To her, segregation
seems both foolish and unnatural. Shc
wonders why there should be a penalty
attached to meeting a man during the
four years in college when it is per-
fectly proper to entertain the same
man at home as a guest.
The daughter of "Fra's" editor be-
lieves equal suffrage is fundamental
to the growth of the nation, inasmuch
as the girls of today will be the moth-
ers of the next generation. While at
Michigan Miss Hubbard intends to
prepare herself for earning a liveli-
hood..

JOB-SEEKERS

REQUI

ELECTIONS

C

TO

The scrubs
vice at all,
and prepare

al

I

TECHNIC HAS NEW
LEASE ON LIFE

STUDENT COUN
THAT MEN OUT
VICES MUST NOS
ING PRINTED CA

a. 4-1

,

as nrst
y bruis- Engineering Society Magazine is Now
Boyle's Required Text in Engineering
it to be Rhetoric Classes.
the re-
if the TO RE PUBLISHE ) EVERY MONTH .
liberni- -
turday. Starting with the October issue of
Fight- the Michigan Technic, all freshman
hich isengineer rhetoric classes will be re-
>e rath-
h. Al- quired to use this publication as one
regular of the required texts. This step was
affair, taken yesterday afternoon at a meet-
aturday ing of the Technic committee, compos-
There ed of Prof. F. N. Scott, Mr. W. D. Mo-
he Case riarty, and Mr. J. R. Nelson of the
.se may rhetoric faculty, and the members of
for im- the Technic board..
et that The following plans were also form-
y about ulated relative to the selection of a
be ab- managing editor and business mana-
r game, ger. An executive committee compos-
nage in ed of two members of the rhetoric fac-
ulty, to be appointed by the dean, and
e work- three students to be elected by the
ffort to members of the Engineering society,
turday. will be given entire control of the edi-
s have torial and business interests of the
times a Technic as well as the power to ap-
es have point the new managing editor and
to re- business manager each year.
t M. A. It was also decided to issue the
as last Technic monthly, and to start a new.
apacity policy of enlivening the paper with
d there notes on the student activities in the
ek-end. engineering department.
GIIGHT. MANDOLIN CLUB PLANS TRYOUTS
en But Pick-Wielders Can Prove Ability in
Competition Tomorrow Night.
ld men Tryouts for the Varsity Mandolin
and the club will be held tomorow evening at
ryouts, 7:00 o'clock in the north wing of Uni-
is year versity hall. According to.I. E. Latti-
Lion, in mer, leader of the club, competition
e espe- will be keener than ever before. He
ry and states, however, that there are a few,
ot been vacant places and that some mandolas
honed and mando-cellos are especially need-

Argued That, If Men Cannot Vote for
Women's Officers, Latter Can-
not Claim Ballot*
Whether or not the women of the
University of Michigan will have equal
suffrage rights with the men at the
coming Varsity managerial elections of
Saturday, is a question which may be
decided in the negative at a confer-
ence today between Director Bartelme
of the Athletic association, and Dean
Myra B. Jordan, representing the wom-
en.
Under the new blanket tax system
of supporting athletics, all students
become, on payment of their $5.00
athletic fee, members of the associa-
tion. Inasmuch as only $2.00 of the
fee paid by women goes to the support
of men's athletics while the remain-
ing $3.00 goes toward the support of
women's athletics, a question as to
whether women should have
equal suffrage rights with the men in
elections which affect men's athletics
only has been raised upon the cam-
pus.
An argument has been advanced
that, under present conditions, the
women should not have any more to do
with election of managers for Varsity
track, baseball and football teams,
than the men should have to demand
votes in elections which pertain only
to women's athletics. Students who
have discussed the matter on the cam-
pus believe that, the matter can be
adjusted in a manner satisfactory to
all.
It is understood that at the time of
the adoption of the new system, the
women intimated through Dean Jor-
dan that they would not demand a vote
in matters pertaining to men's ath-
letics if $3.00 of their fee was turned
over to the support of women's athlet-
ics. It is with this in view, it is stat-
ed, that the conference between Direct-
or Bartelme and Dean Jordan will be
held today, in order that the question
may be settled before Saturday's elec-
tion, and confusion thus avoided.
SOCIALIST SOCIETY SPLITS
ON QUESTION OF SPEAKERS
At a meeting of the Intercollegiate
Socialist club held last evening, some
dissension arose as to whether
speakers should be sent by the society
to near-by towns to lecture on social-
ism, some of the members claiming
this to be contrary to the organiza-
tion's constitution. A special commit-
tee composed of members of both fac-
tions was chosen to decide as to
whether or not the society would di-
vide or continue in its present manner.
Previous to the discussion, officers
for the following year were elected as
follows: Melvin E. Case, secretary;
Herbert Rushbrok, recording secre-
tary; and Miss Jane Meyer, treasurer.
WILL HAVE FEATURE DANCES
FOR WOMEN'S LEAGUE PARTY
The athletic committee of the Wom-
en's league will hold its first party of
the year Friday evening at 8:00 o'clock
at Barbour gym. There will be special
feature dancing in connection with the
sports at Palmer field. All university
women are cordially invited.
DEAN COOLEY VISITS ROSE
POLYTECHNIC AND ILLINOIS
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley visited
Rose Polytechnic Institute at Terre
Haute, Ind., last Friday and the Uni-
versity of Illinois last Saturday, in
search of instructors for the engineer-
ing department. He witnessed the
football game betwen Illinois and Ill-
inois Wesleyan.

3fembers of Campaign Committee Must
Report Results at Once to
Sub-Chairmen.
With the aim of securing 500 more
members for the Michigan Union," the
Students' Campaign committee made
final preparations for the canvassing
of this city at a smoker at the Union
last evening. One hundred men were
present, and the situation and general
nature of the plan were fully explain-
ed by General Chairman Maurice Toul-
me and President Edward G. Kemp.
"When you men go out in this cam-
paign," said President Kemp, "picture,
if you can, the university without a
Michigan Union, and your work will
be so well performed that everyone
will listen to what you have to say:If
you can convey to the men whom you
meet, the idea of a great union of all
university men, your task will be easy.
Let our slogan be '2,500 members for
the Michigan Union.'"
Following a short address by Mau-
rice Toulme, the committeemen were
turned over to their respective sub-
chairmen. Membership books and Un-
ion literature were distributed.
The chairman, together with the
nine sub-chairmen, divided'the city in-
to ten districts, each of which contains
ten or more city blocks. One block,
which is to be canvassed from house
to house, was assigned to each man.
This evening at 7:00 o'clock the sub-
chairmen will meet their men at the
Union. At this time the committeemen
will check with the sub-chairmen and
will start out on the campaign work.
When the men have covered their ter-
ritory, they will telephone their re-
sults to the club-house. An individual
record of the actual work done by
each committeeman will be kept on a
large poster in the Union office. "
Tomorrow evening, the same can-
vass will be repeated in order to reach
those who are not at home tonight.
The Union membership, at a late
hour last evening, had reached the
high mark of 1740.

"Eddie"
IN

AFTERNOON HERE
State Executive and the Rev. J. S.
Williamson, of Lansing, Stop Here
on Inspection Tour.
LEFT FOR LANSING LAST NIGHT.

At its opening mE
last evening, the Stu
ed a resolution prol
campaign cards in
of the junior and se
university. In the op
cil, the students of
be well enough acq
other after two year
make the use of ca
necessary, if not abr
Nominations for s
will be held on Frid
the same time that tl
tions for class officer
election of councilm
Monday, October 14
new councilmen wil
junior lit, engineer
will elect councilmen
Three men will be e
for literary class, o
the unexpired term
whois not in schoo
PrPSAinr+ T ,.H TR

OSBORN SPENDS

Governor Chase S. Osborn
pany with the Rev. J. S. Wil
of the First Congregational

1 --

in com-I1

Lansing, visited Ann Arbor yesterday
afternoon to make an official inspec-
tion of the university.
During the summer, the governor
assisted part of the time by the Rev.
Williamson, who is one of the trustees
of Olivet College, has been making in-
spections of the different state insti-
tutions which number nearly 50. Gov-
ernor Osborn has now examined all of
these with the exception of Central
Normal College at Mt. Pleasant.
Yesterday morning was spent at
Ypsilanti, where the two officials were
shown carefully through the Normal
school. Shortly after finishing their
work there, the party motored to Ann
Arbor in the governor's automobile.
They returned by machine to Lansing
last night.

JANE A

BOARD WILL DISCUSS CANVASS. I WOMEN TO HAVE SECOND PARTY.

will

the Gargoyle. The
onducted on practi-.
s as last year.
SCA FFOLDS
FAULTY CORNICE
gaged in making a
in the rear of the
will be used in the
ces of that building.
n wheels so as to
.ble from place to
k nrogresses. The

ed. The glee club tryouts will be held
the latter part of next week.
TRYOUTS FOR VARSITY BAND
WILL OCCUR RTHIS EVENING.
The annual tryout for the Varsity
band will be held tonight at 7:00
o'clock at McMillan hall, at which time.
all men wishing to try for positions on
the band are requested to appear with
their instruments. Enough new ma-
terial has already appeared to assure
the band of the best instrumentation
>vhich it has had for several years.
FRESH LAWS WILL RECEIVE
ADVICE FROM DEAN BATES.
Dean H enry M. Bates will give his
annual talk to fresh laws this after-
noon at 4:00 o'clock in room B of the

Oratorical Association to Institute En-
ergetic Sales Campaign.
At the meeting of the Oratorical
board tonight the main point of dis-
cussion will be a campaign for new
members. Recently 1200 tickets were
handed over to canvassers for sale, but
as the result has not been entirely suc-
cessful, a more active policy will be
pursued.
Further arrangements will also be
made for the entertainment of Booker
T. Washington, the noted negro edu-
cator, who is to lecture next Monday
evening in University hall, under the
auspices of the Oratorical association.
A date may also be set for the election
of a new vice-president of the board, to
fill the vacancy caused by G. L. Buck's
failure to return to college this year..
MICHIGAN PROVES POPULAR
WITH MONGOLIAN STUDENTS
That Michigan is rapidly assuming
the position of one of the most cos-
mopolitan of American universities is
shown by its large enrollment of for-
eigners this year. There are now in
attendance 60 Chinese students, 12
Japanese, 12 Armenians, five from
British Africa, and others from Porto
Rico, the Philippines, Russia, Canada,
Hawaii, South Africa, Germany, Eng-
land, France and Poland. This fact is
well illustrated in one of Prof. J. L.
Markley's sections in which are 17
students representing nine nationali-
ties.

Sopjs Will Be Guests of Dean Jordan
on Friday Afternoon.
The second of the series of class
parties given by Dean Myra B. Jordan
will be held Friday afternoon at four
o'clock, in Barbour gymnasium, for
the sophomore women of all depart-
ments of the university. The most im-
portant feature of the party will be
the election of the freshman spread
committee, which has entire charge of
finances, programs, and entertain-
ment of the freshmen, at the annual
spread. The committee consists of
over twenty women.
The idea of entertaining freshmen
women originated back in 1885, when
a few upperclass women started the
custom of receiving all the college
women in one of their rooms. The
custom has never been abolished and
has grown to such proportions in the
last few years that a large committee
is now necessary to handle the affair.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS WILL
ATTEND CEREMONY AT ALMA
President Harry B. Hutchins has
sent his acceptance to an invitation.
to attend the inauguration exercises
of Prof. Thomas C. Blais 11 as
president of Alma College. e cere-
monies, which will be cond ed large-
ly by Presbyterian cler men of the
state, are to be held.F. riday afternoon
and evening. The new president for
many years was professor of English
at the Michigan Agricultural College.

"Equal Suffrage" will be the top
a lecture to be given tonight at
o'clock by Miss Jane Addams, of
House, at the Whitney theater.
popular social worker will be in
duced to the Ann Arbor public by
local Equal Suffrage club.
Miss Addams comes to his cit
speak upon a subject in which she
been interested for many years,
which she has advanced through n
azine articles and lectures espec
during the last two years.
Miss Addams is more often sp
of as the founder of the Hull H
of Chicago, she having devoted
past twenty years to settlement w
in that city. As an exponent of e
suffrage, however, she has bec:
prominent during the past two ye
having made many important co
butions to magazines on that sul
and having lectured somewhat ex
sively for that cause. Her belief
fers from tlat of many equal suff
workers in that she advocates gi
to the working woman a right to'
and not confining -the ballot to
more wealthy property owners a
That her talk in Ann Arbor will
treat in any way of partisan poli
views, is the assurance or sbl
association which will introduce
here,
"Miss Addams sincerely believe
qual suffrage and she wishes to
an educative talk, not necessarily
dressed to the student body of M
gan but to all the local public, u
a subject on which she is espec
disposed to talk," was the staten
of Miss Crocker of the local club
night.
The more choice seats in the h
will be on sale today at 25, 15 ata
cents, but free admission can be
ly obtained, as the reservation V
is not excessive.
Geometry Instructor Takes ,1p D
Mr. Wells I. Bennett, a graduat
Syracuse University in 1911, has
appointed instructor in descrip
geometry and free hand drawing.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan