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January 08, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Dily

jLocal $2. 00
rlail $2.50

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70.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENT

PRICE Ii'IvE CiF.NT

1,

i OF

GATHER

ETINGS

igan Technical Experts Here For
Annual Sessions of State
Engineering Society.
[NEERINV SlUDENTS GIVE
AUDEVILI E EN'IERT'AINMENT

I Progriiw Of Association
1e Continued Today
and Tomorrow.

Will

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Wednes-
day, cloudy and colder with some
snow; lowest temperature about 15
degrees; moderate to brisk winds,
mostly northwesterly.
University Observatory- Tuesday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 25.4; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
0.8 ; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 24.8; average wind veloci-
ty 12 miles per hour.
1)R. LFFINGER TO REPRESENT
UNIVERSITY AT DEDICATION
Dean John R. Effinger has been ap-
pointed by Pres. H. B. Hutchins to
represent the University of Michigan
at the dedication of Lincoln half at
the University of Illinois, February 12.
The magnificent new building consists
largely of class rooms for the college
of liberal arts. On the evening of the
dedication ceremonies, Dean Effinger
will be, a guest of honor at the Mich-
igan Alumni banquet, which will be
held at the university.
RINK READY FOR
WINTER PASTIME

Prof. Reeves Meets lif ( 'lsses Again. 1
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the politeal
science department, has just returned'
from Washington, D. C., where he has
been doing some diplomatic research
work for the UnMed States govern-
ment.
TAKES OWN LIFE I
WHILE DERANGED
Congressman Wedilmeyer sithn to
Have (onailted SE" Whle
(Oit of Rig 1Mind,

J ajil'~l~iWIill 1w No Haveni
VRoerg-4 for Radicle Exponeut&,
of1 Poetry of )Ntlton.

Fren'h I is trutor Becomes Benedict
h arry V. Wan, instructor in the
French departinent, and Miss Harriet
Lessig, of Warsaw, Indiana, were mar-
ried at the home of the bride's parents
on January 1. They will live at 710
porest avenue.
- ------------
EXTREME DANCES
WILL BE BARRED

ofI

WAS COMING BAC( FIO1 PA NAMA ('lTTEE TO frEET TOMORROWl

EXAMS A SNAP-IF YOU BUY
THE GARGOYLE FOR JANUARY
The exam issue of the Gargoyle will
appear about the middle of the month
as "the most complete compendium
of information concerning' exams and
methods of getting by, ever publish-
The January number of the humor
book will contain several illustrated
discussions of cramming, cribbing and
actions connected with the honor sys-
tem. An especially- attractive cover
design will characterize -the issue.
PROF. A. R. CRITTENDEN LOSES
CHILDREN DURING HOLIDAYS
Two of the three children of Prof.
and Mrs. A. R. Crittenden died during
the holidays in Tucson, Arizona. The
second son, James, died December 21,
and Alice, the 18-month old daughter,
passed away December 24, just six
hours after Prof. Crittenden reached'
Tucson. Both of the children suc-
cumbed to an attack of intestinal
trouble, which is peculiar to that cli-
mate.
VARSITY IUARTER
LEAVES COLLEGE

Coming from all over the state of
Michigan and numbering among their
membership a large number of the
most prominent engineers in the state,
the Michigan Engineering society op-
ened its annual meeting yesterday af-
ternoon, in the new engineering build-
ing.
Byron E. Parks, of Grand Rapids,
acted as chairman. In the afternoon,
papers were read by C. C. Pashby,
Delmar E. Teed, and W. B. Middleton.
Dinner was held at the Union, and in
the evening the program was resumed.
President H. B. Hutchins delivered
an address of welcome in behalf of
the university to the visiting engi-
neers, and Prof. 11. C. Sadler spoke in
behalf of Dean Al. E. Cooley in extend-
ing .a welcome from the engineering
faculty and students to the practicing'
engineers, members of the society.
-The remainder of the program con-
sisted of a semi-vaudeville program

FOR TEACHEI

PLAN CANVASS
TO GET ROOMS

The Hon. Win. W. Wedemneye 1of this
city, representative in Congress frim
Michigan, committed uicidte last week
by jumping overboard from the steam-
er "Pa'.Tnan"o mf r-f-r-

Extreme dancing will be the subject
for debate at the Junior hop business
meeting tomorrow afternoon. The com-
blied conmmittees for the affair will

Hockey Will Be Popular Sport
Year, According to Present
Indications.

This

CLASS MANAGERS ARE SELECTED
-ockey will begin its second season
as soon as the weather man decides
to co-operate in the general prepara-
tions. The schedule will be announc-
ed the last of this week or the first of

kJau nrt i 1JU4( meet at the Alpha Delta Phi house at
of Colon. Mr. Wedemeyer, who w-m 4: o'clock. At the last meeting of the
graduated from the literary dcpt- (:mmittees, the question of extreme
n 4oand exaggerated dancing was discuss-
ment in '94, and, and a committee was named to
in '95, was returninig fr '.-'rom a ce - consider the matter, and to draw up
sional inspection trip to the a al a set of resolutions giving the forms
whenhe took his life wbiIe tenpdrari- of dances to be permitted. Since the
ly deranged. He had been ill in a:- last meeting of the combined com-
ington previous to h3 leaving toe mittees the faculty has made a state-
Panama, as a result of on ient upon the matter, and it is ex-
ice, but was thought well enough to pected that all extreme forms of danc-
take the trip. es will be barred at the 1914 function.
Soon after his arrival at Panaa At the meeting tomorrow contracts
Mr. Wedemeyer attempted to co vit Will probably be let for programs and
suicide, as a result,'it is said, of beo i- r 4reshinents. An innovation has
ing over his defeat for re-electio. to been planned in the line of refresh-
the house of representatives. HI was nents, and the usual catering contract
taken to the zone hospital at Ancon, iwill be changed. Other committees
but soon recovered sufficiently to take will report, and the work on the fune-
the' return trip back to the States. tion will be planned more in detail.
About four hours out from Panam', on , The independents who expect to at--
January 3, Mr. Wedemneyer eluded two tend the hop will meet at the Michi-
nurses in whose charge he had been gan Union Friday at 4:30 o'clock. At
placed, and jumped overboard. oats jthis time plans will be made both for
were immediately lowered and a the big affair and for the dance -on
'search was made for his body, but it Saturday evening following.
rias unsuccessful.
Mr. Wedemeyer is survived by a -NOR PlMIY TOW
widow and three children.' Mrs. Wed- UNIVERSITY IS NOT KNOWN
emeyer is in a serious condition as a
result of constant worryin.g over her in his inaugural message delivered
husband's illness and the shock she at Lansing, January 1, Governor
received upon hearing the news of her Woodbridge N. Ferris, Michigan's new
husband's death. wchief excutive, gave no intimation of

Irish jokes, while "Marty"
I "Jose" Ramos sang their
orite, "La Fatima." The
s concluded by the recent-
"Dots I Am" sextette.
.y will continue its meet-
nd tomorrow.
OF MARTIN JUDY,
EGARI)El) AS CRITICAL

J~-
Slate Tleachers~ ' on vention Will Tak-e
Place Here if Accommodations
. Are Secured.
FIRST C. A II N FOR ROOMS
BROUGHAT )MEAGRE iRESULTS.
Committee in Charge Must be Assured
of Sleeping Quarters for
7,000 Guests.
Members of the faculty and teach-
ers throughout the city will begin a
personal house-to-house canvass next
Saturday morning in order to secure
the promise of more accommodations
for the members of the Michigan State
Teachers' association, and thereby
make a strenuous effort to gather ev-
idence whiclk will show that sleeping
quarters can be secured in this city
for at least 7,000 guests. Upon the
successful outcome of this canvass de-
pends the decision of the state associa-
tion's executive committee whether it
will hold its next nieeting in Ann Ar-
bor.
At a meeting of the general commit-
tee held yesterday afternoon it was de-
cided to divide the city into 50 dis-

next. TI
pointed
spective
charge al
Those ri
E. H. Sa
'13L, Roc
liam R.lN
'13H.
The ri
readiness
puck-cha
faces tha
west. iM
pleasedv
the tean

presidents have ap-
agers for their re-
ents who will take
the different squads.
nanagerial jobs are:
4, Chas. A. Wagner,
)e Lange, '13E, Wil-
13M, Judson C. King,

from Septicaendi.
-ing Weaker
siital.

,at Ferry field are all in
or the contests and the
s will have two glassy sur-"
'ak among the best in the
iger F. W. DuBois is well-
h the accommodations that'
vill be given both in the
hing and in the great ad-
having the rinks lighted,
nen can practice evenings.
rom the large number of
e going to skate for berths
s, the race for the flag will
ener than that of last sea-
veterans will again be on
their crooked clubs, and
n classes boast pf a num-
of hockey fame who will.
debut on the rinks.
.IECTURE ON EUGENiCS
ighan Named by President
ak Friday Evening.
0. Vaughan has been ap-
resident H. B. Hutchins to;
re on eugenics, for which
tion of $100 was recently
s. Huntington Wilson, of
D. C. The lecture enti-
ics, or Race Betterment,"
n at 8:00 o'clock Friday
sarah Caswell Angell hall.
i has been invited to deliv-
. lecture at the University
n and the University of

WESTERNER IS SECURED IFOR
COMMENCEMENT IDAY A IDRESS
President George E. Vincent, of the
University of Minnesota, will deiiver
the commencement day address this
year. The exercises will be held in
the new Hill auditorium, on June 2
President Vincent is known as one of
the country's greatest educators and
gained considerable note while dean
at the University of Chicago.r

h - - - - j.+ v r r - AA44V V
the poclicy which the 'present admin-
ist atio1n would pursue with regard
to the university. Most of his remarks
along educational lines referred to
the general construction, heating and
ventilation of school houses. He ad-
vised that laws be passed whereby the
superintenidrut of public instruction
and secretary of the state board of
health should have the authority to ap-
prove all plans for school houses
throughout the state. The university
was not mentioned in the address.

"Iub" Huebel Fails to Return After
the Holidays, and Enters Employ
of His Father.
WILL BE BLOW FOR 1913 TEAM.
Herbert H. Huebel, '13E, quarter-
back on the football eleven of 1912,
has left the university. "Hub" has en-
tered the employment of the large
lumbering firm of his father in Me-
nominee, Michigan.
This is the first body blow to the
team of 1913. "Hub" had been with
the Varsity for two years and was con-
sidered as a sure piece of timber for
the All-Western next year. Huebel
began his football career by making
the freshman eleven in 1910. Along
with such men as Craig, Paterson and
Thomson he appeared as Varsity ma-
terial in 1911. Yost, ever on the keen
edge for good material, put "Hub" into{
the backfield his first year as a big
team candidate.
This past year "Hub" was placed in
the position of quarter-back, and Yost
found that the pivot position was
filled by a man big enough to hold it
His generalship in the hard-fougit
Pennsylvania game was flawless. Yos4,
was banking upon this clever little'
dodger to hold the eleven of this fall
in shape, but with this big gap now
to fill, the developments will be inter-
esting to watch.,
"Hub's" favorite stunt on the gridiron
was running through a broken field
and getting dowh under punts. This
kind of work is a real treat to Mich-1
igan enthusiasts of the gridiron andl
Huebet's ability in this line made him
the bright light of many past games.

At the recent executive committee
meeting of the state association in
Kalamazoo, Ann Arbor was regarded
as the logical city in which to hold
the next meeting or the association.
The question of accommodations was
the only obstacle which prevented the
members from deciding in favor of this
city at once. They agreed to leave the
matter in abeyance -until January 18.
If sufficient evidence is brought to
them before that time showing that
all their members can find sleeping
accommodations in Ann Arbor, they
Iwill theni definitely decide to have
their next meeting here.
"The attitude of indifference toward
bringing the meeting here is to be de-
plored," said Prof. C. O. Davis of the
education department. "There are a
number of people throughout the city
who have large houses and who could
accommodate 10 or 15 teacjhers, yet
the post card canvass taken last
month indicated that they were will-
ing to open their homes to only two
or three.
"Only a few of the fraternities and
sororities have returned the cards
sent them, stating the number of
teachers they would' accommodate,
but those which have responded have
promised an encouraging amount of
aid."

GRAND OLD MAN OF MICHIGAN
CELEBRATES HIS 84th BIRTHDAY

President-emeritus James B. Angell,
Michigan's best-loved man, was 84
years old yesterday.
The reporter who took him The
Michigan Daily's good wishes, had
several questions carefully framed
and.,rehearsed. Dr. Angell's man open-
ed the door to him; and, a minute
later, told him to go right on into the
library. Half-way between his chair
and the library door, Dr. Angell met
his visitor with a firm hand-shake and

a kindly smile of welcome. Conver-
sationally, however, he came the whole

way, taking things into

his own

mis time in any . ---
are some stu- HEATHJ BABY RECEiVES ciFT
have not as yet FROM (COMMITTEE MEMBERS
;. The present
for sittings un- The general officers and the ten
it'will be raised committees of the Michigan Union
ary 15 the man- which have served during the past
book states that three months, on Christmas day pre-
eceived. sented to Elizabeth Jane Heath, the
:y handed in is infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer
le than in form- Heath, a sterling silver baby set of
offered in prizes five pieces. The autographs of the
ught for. The 170 committeemen were written on
catory page and heavy paper, illuminated by Harold
re let yesterday Abbott, '13, in gold and colors. The
.t Co., of Phila- different sheets were then arranged
is the date set in proper order and bound in green'
of contracts for pebbled leather, embossed in gold.
and no pictures The book of signatures was given to
that date. Homer Heath.

hands with the same ready address,
the same quick initiative, that have
made of him a great educator and
diplomat. The situation was simple
for hiu.
"Won't you take a seat?" he asked
cheerily, and then, "You've just come
back from your vacation? Or, per-
hals you weren't home?"
"Yes, Sir," said the reporter, "I was
home."
"And you had a good time: I can
miuh "
SFive minutes later those carefully pre-
paredI questions had faded from the
r'porter's mind; and, before he left,
I" had told his host who he was,
t< here he was frem, what he had al-
ready done and was planning to do;
he had answered searching, pointed
questions about The Michigan Daily;
he had sandwiched his good wishes in-
to a sort of conversational gap; he
ha: discussed proof--reading, and
iearned that Dr. Angell was once edi-
tor of a paer; he had heard how Dr.
Angell had learned to spell, 75 years
ago, and told how he himself learned
only a dozen years ago; and he had
listened to a description of travel in
his own distant state in the year
1850.
In short, the interviewer had been
interviewed.

1)r. lfyIrea Appears Before Y. I.
Cabinet to Depict Life in
Far East.,

C. A.

Dr.. C. G. Mylrea, a missionary from
Busrah, Arabia, appeared before a
Cabinet meeting of the Y. M. C. A.
yesterday afternoon in the native Ara-
bian costume, and entertained his au-
dience with a description of the coun-
try and its people. He also displayed
a collection of photographs to illus-
trate his talk, these including some
of the- Michigan people who are en-
gaged in the work there.
Dr. Mylrea is the first representa-
tive who has been sent from Busrah,
and, although there have been maiiy
interesting letters from Dr. Frank
Shaw and the other former Michigan;
students engaged in missionary work
with him, the "student volunteers"
and others interested in the Busrah
movement have been anxiously await-
ing a personal word about the work.
The doctor, who is a graduate of the
University of Pennsylvania, is making
a short lecture tour through the stat-
es, after which he will return to
Arabia.

ARABIAN MISSIONARY HERE
TO EXPLAIN BUSRAH PLANS

FACULT'Y MEN ATTEND MEETIi
Four As ociations Hold Sessions
Boston During Holidnys.
That the university was well r
resented by faculty members at
annual meeting of the American E
nomics, Sociological, Political Scien
and Historical associations, held
Boston, Mass., during the holidays,
shown by the number of Michig
professors who were in attendai
at those meetings. Representing t
economics and political science d
partments were Prof. Henry C. A
ams and Prof. Jesse S. Reeves. Pm
C. H. Cooley, of the sociological d
partment, was also present at, 1
meetings, and Professors C. H. V
Tyne, A. L. Cross and U. B. Phill:
attended sessions of the Historic
association.
Col. Theodore Roosevelt was pre
dent and presiding officer of the H
torical association, and both amus
and electrified the big assemb
Roosevelt, who is an historical autho
ity himself, is said to be persona
acquainted with a large number
the historians of the country a
could not only recognize many
them at the 'meetings, but could ca

Celebrated His 84th
Yesterday.

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