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December 20, 1912 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1912-12-20

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Local $2.00
I Mail $2.50

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The

Michigan

Daily

ILocal $2.00
Mlail $2.50

Vol. XXIII, No. 69. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY DECEMBER 20, 1912. q PRICE FWIV CENT

CAMPUS CANAL
SYSTEM WOWT
EQUAL.MARTIAN
Renowned War God in No Danger of
Being Rivalled as Ditch
Digger by Campus
Professionals.;
CONTI RACTORS RESPONSIBLE
IF TIlAMPING IS IMPROPER.

a

I

THE WEATHER MAN

Study n Black----& White ??

Forecast for Ans Arbor- Friday,
unsettled weather with the'probabili-
ty of snow; there will be no marked
change in the temperature; moder-
ate westerly winds, becoming more or
less variable later in the day. -
University Observatory-Thursday,
7:00 p. m., temperature, 26.0; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
31.9; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 25.0; average wind velocity
12 miles per hour.
NORMAN HACKETT PAYS ANN
ARBOR "UNPROFESH" VISIT.

IoDI MBko
u i. r. Te. Wed l. rrPr Sat.
22 2 24 25 26 27 28
a-«

f
/. 3
C.,

Superintendent Marks Says Dirt
Newly Filled Trenches Will
Not Settle.

in I

There will be little settling, if any,
in the trenches that were recently re-
filled over the new fire protection sys-
ten mains. Contrary to the "expert,"
who advanced some ideas on the prob-
ability of the campus being cut by a.

'ormer Student is Now Starring
Play From Alumni
Pens.

in

Normii K. Hackett, the well known
actor, and a former member of the
Michigan comedy club, is visiting

"WISING YOU' ALL - _ -

series of canals next spring, due to friends in Ann Arbor today. Mr.'Hack-

improper refilling of the trenches,
James Hf. Marks, superintendent of
grounds, stated yesterday that this
part of the work had not been over-
looked and that a consultation of ex-
perts had been held before the meth-
od of refilling was decided on. After
that, the supervision of the work was
done under the direction of Prof. W.
C. Anderson.
"There must be considerable dis-
placement of soil," he said, "when
twelve inch iron pipes are laid, and
getting all the dirt back into the
trench is an utter impossibility."
"If the trenches were dug in clay
soil at a considerable depth there
might be some opportunity for an un-
due settling of the filling," said Prof.
W. C. Road, of the sanitary engineer-
ing department, "but since the trench-
es are being dug in sandy soil, and are
being packed as they are filled, such
a thing is hardly possible."
The specifications of the contract
provide that any undue . settlement
which subsequently occurs must be
remedied by the contracting engineer,'
and it is therefore to his advantage to
get back all that is necessary.. The
more he puts in the trenches, the less
there is to haul away.
Chen1 Library to Keep "Open House."
The library in the chemical build-
ing will be open during Christmas va=
cation from 8:00 o'clock a. m. to 5:00
o'clock p. nm., every day except Sun-
day.

ett is at present touring in a new
production entitled "The Deceiver,"
but he is now taking a Christmas lay-
off, which he is spending in Detroit,
his home.
In starring in "The Deceiver,"
Mr. Hackett is working in a unique
production. The play is adapted from
the O. Henry story of "The Double
Dyed Deceiver,"_ by Prof. Stuart of
Princeton, a former Michigan man.'
The incidental music is written by
Otto Kruger, of Toledo, also a former
Michigan man, and a member of the
mandolin club.
PROF. PILLSBURY TO GO ABROAD.
Ill Health Forces Him to Give Up
His Work.
Prof. W. B. Pillsbury, head of the
department of psychology, will prob-
ably leave for Italy next week. He
had expected to go abroad February
1 when his regular leave of absence
begins, but about two weeks ago he
was taken ill during a lecture and
since that time has been advised by
his physicians to leave as soon as ar-
rangements can be made.
Assistant Professor J. F. Shepard
will assume charge of all classes in
psychology for the remainder of the
semester, whether Prof. Pillsbury
leaves during the holidays or not. This
will necessitate another assistant in
the psychology department next sem-
ester.

FOLLOWS IN STEPS
OF TWIN BROTHER,
Paul Blanshard Wins Peace Contest
Which Was Awarded Relative
Last Year./

SEES BIG FUTURE
FOR ALMA MATER
Captain Sealby Writes From Italy,
Prophecying Great Things'
for Michigan Union.

GOTHAM ALUMNI WILL HOLD
ANNUAL DINNER NEXT MONTH
The New York City Alumni associa-
tion will hold its annual ,diner at the
Hotel Astor January 24. This is the
banner event of the year for Michi-
gan alumni in New York, and it is ex-
pected that over 300 men will attend.
President Hutchins has accepted an
invitation to be present at the ban-
quet, and many prominent alumni
will be called on by the toastmaster.
This dinner is not for the New York
alumni alone, and alurni of other
cities who are contemplating a visit
in the East this winter will be wel-
comed at the celebration.
FORMAL INVITATION WILL
BE GIVEN STATE TEACHERS
Canyass for Accommodations is Sue-
cessful Anough to Warrant
Asking for Meeting.
Accommodations for 4,500 visitors
having been guaranteed to the commit-
tee in charge of the preliminary can-
vass, three representatives have been
appointed to meet the executive cot-
mittee of the Michigan State Teachers'
association in Kalamazoo today and
present the formal invitation to the
association tohold its next 'meeting
in Ann Arbor.
Those in charge of the canvass, met
in the city hall yesterday and 'found
that 937 out of the 4,000 post cards
sent= out, had been returned and that
accommodations for 2,907 teachers had
been promised by the senders.
In addition to these promises the city
Y. M. C. A. has agreed to tape care
of 40 people and the fraternities, so-
rorities and clubs 500. The hotels can
be depended on to furnish lodgings
for 500 more and another 500 can be
lodged in Ypsilanti.
FERRY 'FIELD WILL _BE "GLASSY";
WHEN HOCKEYITES RETURN.
Ferry field will be ready for the
hockey men immediately after Christ-
mas holidays. The managers of the
different departmental teams will be
announced at this time by the presi-
dents of the'senior classes in the
league. Although the schedule has not
been drawn up, the first game will
probably be played the second week
after the holidays. On account of the
lighting of the rinks by strong arcs,I
the schedule may possibly be length-
ened this winter to give the teams
made up of new men a chance to geti
more organized team work and so
make a harder fight for the flag.

MICHIGAN MA
GIVEN RHODES
SCHOLARSHIP
Percival V. Blanshard, '14, is Selected
From Among Four Candidates
by Unanimous Decision
of Committee.
APPOINTEE GOES TO OXFORD
NEXT FALL FOR THREE YEARS
Was Winner of Many Oratorical Con-
tests in University and in
High School.
Percival V. Blanshard, '14, was
granted the Rhodes scholarship yes-
terday noon by a unanimous decision
of the state committee composed of
Chief Justice Joseph B. Moore, B. W.
Anthony, president of Adrian college,
Samuel Dickie, president of Albion
college, Pres. H. B. Hutchins and Dean
John R. Effinger. The scholarship en-
titles Blanshard to a three year course
at'xford university, England, with an
allowance of $1,500 a year.
Blanshard was given the decision
over three candidates who successfully
passed the scholarship examination
this fall and those who made a sat-
isfactory grade in last year's examina-
tion. It is considered, very unusual
for an undergraduate to gain such
a distinction. Blanshard will leave
Ann Arbor for Cambridge. next Sep-
tember and will probably specialize
in philosophy.
He was-graduated from Detroit
Central High school in 1910. In his
senior year he won the Berger ora-
torical medal, the highest oratorical
honor in the school. Last year, while
a sophomore in the university, he con-
tinued to 4istinguish himself along
oratorical lines by winning the local
peace contest, the state contest at
Lansing, the interstate at Monmouth,
Ill., and the national contest held at
Lake Mohonk, in May.
Dean Schlotterbeek Visits Campus.
Dean J. O. Schlotterbeck of the phar-
macy department, who is taking a
leave of absence for one year, was in
Ann Arbor yesterday. He is engaged
in installing a laboratory in the plant
of J. Hungerford Smith at Rochester,
New York.

JUDGES

DECISION UNANIMOUS. ALSO HOPES FOR VARSITY CREW.
t

Paul B. Blanshard, '14, whose' twin Capt. Inman Sealby, '12L, who has

MONTHS OF WAITING AT LAST
BRING DAY OF JOY AND SORROW

brother won the state and national
Peace contests last year, and yesterday
afternoon received the Rhodes
scholarship, was the victor in the Uni-
versity Oratorical contest last night.
Blanshard's oration, "The Evolution
of Patriotism," won first place by a
unanimous decision, and in the opin-
ion of a number of the faculty of the
oratory department is the equal of*hat
of his brother last year. 1,
He has the honor of representing the
university against the colleges of
Michigan at the state contest to be held
at the Michigan State Normal College,.
March 24. The winner of this contest,
in turn, goes to the national contest
to be held at the Lake Mohonk Peace
Conference next summer. There are:
substantial testimonials for first and
second honors in both of these con-
tests.
Last night's contest was closer than
the unanimous result would indicate
and all the men are deserving of cred-
it for their showing. J. W. Harding,
'14L; H. C. Tallmadge, '14; N. H. Gold-1
stick, '15L; and S. S. Grosner, '14L,.
were the other speakers.
Ex-Congressman Edwin L. Denby,
'96L, of Detroit, presided at the con-
test, which was held in Sarah Caswell:
Angell hall. Prof. T. E. Rankin, of
the rhetoric department; Prof. J. L.'
Markley, of the mathematics depart-
ment; Prof. A. H. Lloyd, of the philos-!
ophy department; Asst. Prof. C. E. Eg-'
gert, of the German department; and
Rev. Stalker, were the judges.
AS STUDENTS DEPART, REGENTS
WILL HOLID DECEMBER SESSION
While the students are thinking of
mistletoe and holly wreaths, as well
as the train schedule, the university
fathers.will be discussing the neces-
sary amount needed to carry the uni-
versity through the "dog days." The
board of regents is scheduled to hold
its .December meeting today and the
summer school budget will be the main
object of discussion.
Unless the economy shears are used
to some extent the budget will exceed
that of last year. Regular routine
matters will also be disposed of.

been studying in Italy shows the same
loyal interest in Michigan affairs as
he displayed when on the campus. Ac-
cording to a letter received recently
from Siena, Italy, the old sea captain
is concerned not only with matters of
immediate interest, but with the fu-
ture of the Michigan Union and the
organization of a canoe club.
"I am looking ahead a few years,"
reads the letter, "to the time when
Michigan has expanded herself into
the lead and taken her place in inter-
university events. There must be no
waiting now, but the present body
must work for future achievements.
The period for turning back is now
passed, and the Union must grow."
He is also looking forward to the
completion of the new dam on the
Huron river when a canoe club will
be organized for the presentation of
regattas, carnivals, excursions, and
races. Out of this he predicts will
grow a boat club ahd eventually the
long-looked-for Michigan crew.
Capt. Sealby is also eager for the
proposed new Union clubhouse. "The
Union must stand for the unity of the
wholesuniversity," he writes. "The
campus is not overorganized; it sim-
ply lacks centralization, and the one
place for that is the Michigan Union."
Following his stay in Italy, Capt.
Sealby left for England, December 10,
where he is now making an investiga-
tion of the courts. He will leave there
for San Francisco on January 10, and
on his way West will spend a few days
in Ann Arbor.
SENIOR "CIVILS" WILL HOLD
"VAMP" DANCE AFTER HOLIDAYS
Final arrangements for "Camp"
dance, the social function of the senior
civil engineers who spent their past
summer on the shores of Douglas
Lake, have been completed. The dance
will be held on January 16, at the
Packard academy.
"Proc." Brown, chairman of the
function has planned many features,
among which will be the requirement
that every man wear his camp clothes.
A special edition of the "Black-Fly,"
the official camp paper, will be pub-
lished,and all members of the "Darbs,"
and "Tweedlers," will be on hand
-with their latest musical attractions.

FORTY FUN FAMISHED KIDDIES
GIVEN GLIMPSE OF YULETIDE

That day is here. Gradually the soft
pencil has erased the figures off the
calendar- until one remains. And in
consequence joy, or a pseudo sensa-
tion of it, reigns in Ann Arbor.
Today is the day of sorrow too. Mus-
cular exertion trying to get a trunk-
full into a suitcase, hastily withdrawn
bank balances, selecting a present for
"her" an-i last of all attending' those
last three classes convert the long
awaited jubilee into an inferno.
Exodus-is the word that will char-
acterize, for ye Merry Yuletide is up
betimes this morning, armed for the
fray, and college work, functions and
pleasures must fade before its on-
slaught of gayety. The trains are to
be the working men. It is likely that
in the neighborhood of three thousand
young men and women will journey
away during the twenty four hours,
just ushered in. Ann Arbor is sad in
consequence.
State tre t will be deserted. The
campus walks will be neglected. Per-
haps even the' snow will obliterate
them completely, except for an occas-

ional track that marks the route of
some of the "stay overs," trudging to
labors in the library or seeking relief
from the attack of the azure variety
by a constitutional. Even the bushy
tailed squirrels are downcast for they
wol.'t have the daily handout that has
kept athem sleek all fall.
But though' the streets are going
,to be pretty gthinly populated, those
who are forced to spend the holiday
time here will have gaiety. Unfortun-
ates, who live too far away to be able
to gather, around the family hearth,
have a certain bond of fellowship that
will bring them nearer to each other.
Then too, the people of Ann Arbor feel
the sorrow of the lonesome students
and open up their hearts, bringing
some joy at least.
Mean while the more fortunate get
in the "whirl." Possibly there is some
study but mostly it is a made jumble
of dances, sleighr.ides,' cosy corner
talks and gatherings about an over-
fiow.ing board. Then comes the return
to work-but why cast shadows.
Merry Christmas is the greeting and
Happy New Year, the farewell.

Did you ever go to a real Christias'
party,-no, not where there are grown
ups, (for grown ups never have real
Christmas parties,) but a Christmas
party, where there are only little chil-
dren, bubbling over with the season's
spirit and cheer? There was such a
one right here in Ann Arbor yester-
day, and more than forty little tots,
who had never had a real Christmas
before in their lives, were visited by
Santa, and hosts of good things to eat.
They were not ordinary little boys and
girls, who had always had a Santa, but
boys and girls, who- had stood for
weeks looking longingly, into the shop
windows, nose flattened against the
panes, and wondering if they too,
might by some miracle, get some of
the good things,-"just what they
wanted." They did, and last night
there wer.e forty little folks the hap-
pier and forty less Tearstained faces
in this old town.
And this was the way it happened.
Twenty girls, a little wiser than most,,
and bored by the usual Christmas
"stunts" got together and wondered
what new and novel thing could -be
done, in the way -of 'propagating the

Christmas holiday s'pirit. One had an
inspiration; it was whispered around,
only whispered, for it was a great se-
cret. The Ann Arbor Associated Char-
ities was consulted, and a list of the
names of all the needy little tots ob-
tained; a deal of shopping was done,
including toys, of all sorts, candies
and other goodies. And the climax of
it all was, that yesterday afternoon
the Alpha Phi sorority entertained in
grand style, all the poor little boys
and girls of the city.
It was wonderful to see them, with
their toys hugged close rhnning about
the rooms, and forgetting everything
in the wild joys of Christmas games.
and how they did eat! The girls were
,in mortal fear that the stuff would
not hold out but it did, and each little
tot, at six o'clock carried away his or
her little sack o' goodies, as well as
"just the thing he wanted."
The best Christmas party they ever
had-all the Alpha Phis agree, and
though it was the first tots' party they
had been at for a long while, they are
already looking forward to a repeti-
tion on a more extensive scale next
year.

THE

MICHIGAN

DAILY

Wishes

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