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December 19, 1912 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1912-12-19

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Local $2.00
Mail $2.50I

The

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Daily

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Vol. XXIII, No. 68. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, T H !SDAY, D CEMlBER 19, 1912. PRICE FIVE CENT

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FOOTBALL MEN
PLAND TO KEEP
IN CONDITION
Forty Members of This V ear's Varsity,
Reserve, and FreshIrzan Squad,
Meet in Wutermna Gym to
Iiscuss Prospects.
RECORDS TO SHOW THE WORK
EACH MAN HAS DONE AT GYM.
Captain Patterson, Trainer Farrell,
and Clement Quinn Speak
to Athletes.
Deploring the limited size of Mich-
igan's football squad of the past few
years and appealing to every man' eli-
gible for the team next fall to keep in
condition scholastically, as well, as
physically, Captain-elect, "Bubbles"
Paterson, Trainer "Steve" Farrell,
and "Clem" Quinn addressed an en-
thusiastic gathering of prospective
varsity material in the Waterman
gymnasium last evening.
About forty members of this year's
varsity, reserve and fresh squads
turned out, and the outlook for next
fall vws carefully reviewed. It was
impressed upon the men that the suc-
cess of Michigan on the gridiron next
season depended entirely upon the ef-
forts that they exerted as individuals
between now and next October. Not
only must each man keep his head
well above the level in an academic
way, but he must keep a weather eye
upon the general condition of his phy-
sique.
In order to stimulate interest among
the athletes for their self condition-
ing a system has been instituted at
the gymnasium whereby a complete
record of- each man's work done on the
floor and track may be kept for refer-
ence next fall. There is nothing com-
pulsory about the idea, it being simp-
ly a suggestion intended especially for
the benefit of the heavier men on the
]ine who are inclined toward obesity
during the off months.
MODERN BOOKS ORDERED BY
GERMAN PLAY FUNDI COMMITTEE
Copies Will be Given to the General
Library and Placed on
Circulation Shelves.
The comimttee in charge of the Ger-
man play fund, which arose from the
successful production given here a
short time ago by the German Volk
players, has sent in an order for a list
of books which comprises the best
work of modern German authors. The
first order involves an expenditure of
$150, leaving the committee a balance
of $50.00 which will be used to pur-
chase the principal books of the new
year.
The books will be presented to the
general library and will be placed on
the circulation shelves. As most of
the order can be filled in New York, it
is expected that they will arrive here
by the end of the semester.
The first selection comprises the
works of the main representatives of
the naturalistic lyric school, the com-
plete works of the recent German
writers,-Gerhardt Hauptman, Thom-
as Mann, Arthur Schnitzler, Gustav
Fennsen, Herman Sudermann, Arnol
Holz, Ebner Eschenbach, Theodore
Storm, C. F. Meyer, and Richard Wag-
ner, as well as the principal works of
Max Halbe, Carl Hauptmann, George

Hirschfeld, Johannes Schlaf, Karl
Schonherr, Frank Wedekind, and
Heinrich Mann.
DETROIT EASTERN HIGH TO
DEBATE LOCAL PREP TEAM.
Ann Arbor High's debating team
will take on Detroit Eastern at the
High School auditorium on Friday
night at 7:30 o'clock, on the question:
"Resolved, that the constitution be
amended so as to debar all immigrants
unable to read or write, who are four-
teen years or more of age or over;
provided, that this shall not debar im-
migrants dependent upon qualified im-
migrants residents of the United Stat-
es." An admission fee of 25 cents will

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Thursday,
cloudy, unsettled and colder with the
probability of snow; moderate west
to northwest winds.
University Observatory-Wednesday
7:00 p. in., temperature, 31.4; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preced-
ing, 41.5; minimum temperature, 24
hours preceding, 27.9; average wind
velocity 8 miles per hour.
JUNIOR LITS INNOVATE
DINNER AND DANCE IDEA.
Junior lits were successful last night
in an innovation in the line of social
activities. A combined dinner and
dancing party drew nearly 100 coup-
les from the third year class to make
merry before breaking up for, vacation.
This is the first time that any class on
the campus has attempted a combined
affair of exactly this kind.
The dinner was followed by toasts
and music from both the men and
women of the class and numerous fea-
tures appropriate to Christmas made
the dlance distinctive. Prof. and Mrs.
C. H. Van Tyne and Prof. and Mrs. J.
R. Brumm were the chaperones.
Michiganensian Artists Meet Tonight.
The last meeting of the Michiganen-
sian artists before the holidays will
be held tonight at 7:00 o'clock in the
Michiganensian office. The meeting is
especially important as the final date
for drawings is January 15.
RESIDENTS SLOW
TO OFFER ROOMS

ORATORS COMPETE
IN FINALS TODAY
Fie l)eclainers to Iry or Honor of
Entering the sate Peace
('on te ..
FIVE .11JI'IES TO MAKE AWARDS.,
Final selection of the speaker to
represent Michigan in the Peace Ora-
torical cortest will be made at the
final university contest tonight. The
program will be held in Sarah Cas.%e lc
Angell hall, and will begin at 8:00
o'clock. Five men, who qualified in the
.preliminary contests will speak, the
number of entries being reduced i is
year to shorten the program, which
now only consumes an hour and a
hal;.
The order in which the men wil
speak, and the subject of their orn-

FACULTY MEN TO
MEET AT BOSTON
S Pirvossors Will Atteid 1eetings,
and Prof. Van Tyne Will
Read a Iaper.
,1 1 S'VL T TO PRESIDE.
Siadents are not the only collegians
who go niaces during the holidays.
Six of th MP 'igan faculty, represent-
in e grat variety of departments,
will make a trip to Boston, Mass., this
varrion, to attenId meetings of soci-
ertis as ciatcd with the different sub-
jects i which hey are interested.
The twenty-fifth annual meeting of
lte Animeri'a n Economics Association
w il be held Boston, from Friday
cx uing, Ileccmuer 27 to' Tuesday af-
a 1oon, l-emher 31, 1912, and the
following other societies will hold

tions are as follows: J. W. Harding, their annual meetings at the same
'14L, "The Armed Peace of the uited time and placc: the American Histor-
States;" 11. C. Tallmadge, "14, "The ical Associaon, the American Polit-

Disarmament of Nations;" Paul B.
Blanshard, '14, "The Evolution of Pa-
triotism;" S. S. Grosner, '14L, "Our
Country's Call;" and N. H. Goldstick,
'15L, "The Mockery of Peace."
The following gentlemen will act as
judges: Dr. Stalker; Prof. T. E. Rank-
in, of the rhetoric department; Prof.
A. H. Lloyd, of the philosophy depart-
ment; Prof. C. E. Eggert, of the Ger-
man department; and Prof J. L. Mark-
ley, of the mathematics department.
Ex-congressman Edwin L. Denby,
'96L, of Detroit, will preside.
The contest will be a regular num-
ber on the lecture course of the ora-
torical association, and membership
tickets will admit to it. General ad-
mission will be 25 cents.
LIARGE INCREASE IN BOOKS
SHOWN BY LIBRARY REP(VRT1,
Report of the accessions division
of the library has just been made for
the month of November and displays
interesting facts as to the number of

ma! Science Association, the Ameri-
can Sociological Society, the Ameri-
can Statistical Association, and the
American Assocation of Labor Legis-
lation.
. The faculty members who expect to
attend some of these meetings are
Prof. J. S. Rvees, of the political sci-
euce departnent; Arthur F. Cross,
professor of European history; U. B.
Phillips, professor of American his-
tory; Pr., C. . Cooley of the socio-
logical (lepartment; and Professor
C:'aude 1i. Van Tyne of the history de-
partment.
Professor Van Tyne will read a pa-
per before the American Historical
Association on "The Religious Forces
in the American Revolution." Colonel
Theodore Roosevelt is president of the
Historical Association this year and
will- make the opening address of the
V l13EA T T 1 BE WIVEN E
V - 11R!i 11 A T T HE WHITNEY

State Teachers' Association May
Meet Here Because -of Lack
of Facilities.

Not

COTS MAY BE PLACED IN GYMS.
The committee in charge of the pre-
liminary canvass which is to deter-
mine whether accommodations for the
7,000 members of the Michigan State1
Teachers' association can be secured
if the meeting is held here, reported
that only 636 cards out of the 4,000
sent out had been returned up to yes-
terday afternoon. Accommodations
were promised for approximately 2,000
people.
The post cards and accompanying
promises of co-operation are not com-
ing in as-fast as desired. Members of
the committee believe that the people
of Ann Arbor have not yet realized
what an enormous undertaking is be-
ing planned, and what a great benefit
a meeting of the teachers' association
would be to the city.
"The post cards sent out by the
committee should be returned at
once,"said Prof.C.O.Davis of the educa-
tion department. "We must know by
Thursday evening whether or not we
will be able to take care of the meet-
ing. The general committee will meet
at this time and we hope that suffi-
cient accommodations can be guaran-
teed to warrant us in sending a dele-
gation to meet the executive commit-
tee of the teachers' association in Kal-
amazoo on Friday, and extend to them
the formal invitation from the univer-
sity. We cannot do this, however,
unless the cards are returned at
once.-
From present indications the com-
mittee feels that accommodations for
at least 3,000 will be secured by the
post card canvass, if the hotels, fra-
ternities, sororities, and clubs re-
spond. Each gymnasium, when pro-
vided with cots, can take care of 1,000
people. Accommodations for 6,000
would thereby be provided for and the
dmmittee would feel justified in ex-
tending the invitation.
Pa-rlor Dramatics Given by Thespians.
Proscenium held a meeting last
night at the home of Mr. Albert Lock-
wood. Two one act plays were pre-
sented, "The Stronger," by Strindberg,
and "The Farewell Supper," by
Schnitzler. Isabelle Rizer, Marjorie
Nicolson, and Catherine Reighard
played in the former, and Lois Town-
ley, John Townley, Edward Moseman,
and Richard Pride, in the latter.

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new books acquired by the university. The dite for the presentation of,
The list is as follows: the general li- "Koepnickorslrasse 120," the Deutsch-
brary 1,800 volumes; the medical li- er Verein play, has been set for Fri-
brary, 155; the homeopathic library, day evening. March 13. It will be pre-a
12; the engineering library, 69; the sented, as usual, at the New Whitney
architectural library, 1; the dental li- theater and the seats will probably
brary, 22. As compared with the four go on sale the Tuesday preceding.
preceding months, November shows There will be a change this year in
an increas# of 133 over the preceding the manner of selling reduced tickets
highest; the figures for July, August, to students, but this will riot be de-
September and October being 1,403, cided until after vacation, when a bus-
807, 699, and 1,936 volumes respect- mness manager will be appointed by the
ively. director.
LIBRARIES TO REMAIN OPEN INSTIi Ti{lit IN FRENCH TO
I)URING CHRISTMAS RECESS JOIN RANKS OF BE.. _I)ICTS.
Foi the benefit of those unfortunate Mr. Ilarry V.Wana, instructor in the
"left overs" who expect to ornament Frkench department, will be united in
the general libraries with their holi- marriage to Miss Harriet Louise Les-
day patronage, announcement is made sig of Warsaw, Indiana, on January
that, with the exception of Christmas 1. The marriage will take place at
and Christmas Eve, New Year's and the home of the bride's parents in
New Year's Eve, the libraries will be vrsaw, which is the former home of
kept open the same hours as during Mr. Wann. fuss Lessig is a.graduate
the regular term. For the benefit of 'of De auw university and a member
those who have library books at home, of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority. They
it may be said that all books, no mat- will reside. at 710 Forest avenue.
ter for what time loaned out, must be --------
returned to the circulation desk by R pi L. ('ubb, '09, Injured in Ohio,.
Friday afternoon. Ralh L. Chubb, 09E, was injured
_in a grade crossing accident at Ash-
Fresh Clym (lasses Given Extra Rest tabula, Ohio, on Monday, One leg
Freshman gym classes will not meci was broken and his head was badly
today and tomorrow, according to Dr. lacerated. His injuries are not as se-
May, and the first meeting of each i-icus a they at first appeared to be,
section after the holidays has also and his recovery is now regarded as
been cancelled. conn.
Seeing Snowclad Stranger,
Sawboncs 0Ck Sweetheart
Embryo pill-prescribers, poring ov- sare room in his cerebrum to the
er the ponderous tomes in the medical over-crowded psychopathic ward.
The (islinguished looking stranger
library yesterday afternoon, paused red to be none other than Dr. J B.
to rub their eyes when a majestic fi- _ eiogg, of Battle Creek, a well known
ure, clad entirely in white, came qui- cereal king, who came with his libra-
etly into the room and solemnly pick- Tian to in-1ect the medical library here.
ed out a quiet nook where he inum edi- I When leis identity became known,
ately became engrossed in a large vol- some of the students became so hun-
ume. Visions of the venerable Mark gry at tie suggestion of the name
Twain, resurrected from his grave to that they could no longer keep their
play a joke on a few hapless medics, minds on their work. It is not known
arose in the minds of the startled whether the librarian is the "Sweet-
spectators, and some began to think heart of the Corn" or not, but the half
that one of the internes in the hospital dozen medics in the library yesterday
must have taken a notion to rent some thought it likely.

UNION TO HOLD NEW YEAR PARTY
'Stay-Here" Students Will Dance as
Year Changes.
An extra Union dance will be given
December 31 to watch the old year
out and the new one in. Dancing will
start at 9:00 and continue until. 2:00
o'clock. Tickets will go on sale at the
Union desk Sunday December 29 at
2:00 o'clock and will sell for 75 cents.
Tickets for the regular Saturday
evening dance at the Michigan Union
will go on sale today at 5:00 o'clock
at the Union desk. The committee for
the dance is Harold Abbott, '13, chair-
man, Fred B. Foulk, '13, and John
Reighard, '13.
The Saturday night dances will be,
continued throughout the vacation as
an accommodation for the students re-
maining in Ann Arbor. A capacity
crowd of 100 couples is expected to at-
tend the dances and tickets will go on
sale the Thursday preceding at 5:00
o'clock.
FOREIGNERS DISTRIBUTE
LITERATURE ON MICHIGAN.
The Michigan number of the Cosmo-
politan Student, the official publication
of the Corda Fratres-Association of
Cosmopolitan clubs has proved to be,
popular among the foreign students,
here. Many copies of the number have
been ordered from the publishers, and,
will be distributed among friends of
some of the foreign students as a part7
of the publicity propaganda in behalf,
of more foreign students for the uni-
versity.
YULETIDE STAMPSj
HAVE HEAVY SALE
Business Men, High School, Sororities,7
and Fraternities Help the
Cause Along.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA LEADS LIST
Ann Arbor's keen interest in the
nation wide sale of tuberculosis
stamps for the cure and prevention of
tuberculosis is evinced by the great7
number of stamps sold in the city;
thus.far. Of the concerns in Ann Ar-
bor who have placed an order for
stamps to be used on their correspond-
ence the Eastern Michigan Edison Co.
heads the list with an order of 35,000
stamps.
Since last Monday the local agents
have maintained a table in the post-
office from 2:30 to 5:00 p. m. every
afternoon. Young women from the
Ann Arbor high school have offered
their services every afternoon from
now until Christmas and at least two
of the fair helpers may be found at the
aforementioned time and place every
day supplying those who "come early
to avoid the rush." Between four and
five hundred stamps have been sold
daily and it is stated that at least
double that number will be sold daily
shortly before the holidays.
A little private boosting of which
few are cognizant, is being done in the
sororities and the fraternities. The
Kappa Alpha Theta sorority has re-
ported a sale of a little over 500
stamps among its members, while its
nearest competitor, the Alpha Epsilon
Iota sorority has disposed of 200.
Reports from the other sororities and,
fraternities have not been turned in
as yet, but should the sale at these
organizations equal the order several
thousand stamps will have been dis-
posed of.
J-LAW SMOKERS TO HEAR

ORATORY AND MUSIC TONIGHT
Prof. Emeritus Bradley M. Thomp-
son, of the law department, James T.
Keena, a prominent Detroit lawyer,
and Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the lit
department, will be speakers at the
junior law smoker tonight. With one
or two possible exceptions, all the
members of .the law faculty will be
present. "Eddie" Kemp will entertain
the class with several solos and "Fix"
Fixel will play some of his composi-
tions on the piano, while "Hagy" Hag-
aman is on the program to play any-
thing anybody wants on the piano.
The committee reports over 100 tick-
ets sold. The affair will begin at 7:00
o'clock.

CONCLUDES HIS
INTERNATIONAL
LAW LECTURES-
D)r. James B. Angell Narrates Incident
of Great Significance in
the Recent War With
Spain.
ILLUSTRATES POINT FROM
HIS PERSONAL EXPERIENCE
While Turkish Minister He Kept Fleet
of Enemy From Reaching
Dewey's Ships.
With the sixth of a series of lectures
on "The Rights and' Obligations of
Neutrals and Beligerents," President
Emeritus James B. Angell yesterday
gave his last lecture before the class
in international law. The entire se-
ries was read from notes formerly
used by Dr.Angell while he was in act-
ive charge of -the international law
course, with the addition of comments
occasioned by recent developments in
the field of international jurispru-
dence.
As the end of the lecture hour ap-
proached yesterday, and the "grand
old man" of the campus prepared £o
leave the room, he was cheered with
applause which lasted several mo-
ments, all of those present realizing
that it was probably the last time that
the venerable ex-president would ever
address his former class in a regular
course of lectures.
In illushlating the principle that a
beligerent cannot obtain a large sup-
ply of coal in the port of a neutral,
Dr. Angell cited a case which once
came under his own observation.
"WhilI I was serving the United
States as a diplomatic agent in Tir-
key," said the president-emeritus,
"the Spanish war broke out. Spain
planned to send a fleet to Manila by
way of the Turkish possession, Port
Sais, which was of course a :neutral
harbor. It was necessary that this
fleet stop here, because it could not
carry a sufficient quantity of coal to
reach its destination.
"The squadron having reached Port
Sais, the Turkish minister of foreign
affairs came to me and asked if it were
permissible to furnish the Spaniards
with enough fuel to reach Manilla. I
believe that he knew the rule of inter-
national law dealing with that matter
as well as I, but nevertheless I in-
formed him that of course he could
supply the Spanish with coal-that is
with just enough to get back to Spain.
This was done. Thus Admiral Dewey
was spared the necessity of troubling
himself about this particular fleet."
The course in international law will
be continued after the holidays by
Prof. J. S. Reeves, who has been en-
gaged in research work at the Carne-
gie Institute, Washington, D. C., for
the last six weeks.
. . 0

FORESTRY GRADS AID FACULTY.
J. H. Bedford, '10, Head of Oregon
Reservation Discusses Problems.
J. M. Bedford, '10, a graduate of the
forestry department was in town re-
cently, for the purpose of a confer-
.ence with the forestry fiaculty on prob-
lems in handling timber. Mr. Bedford
is in charge of the Klamath Indian
Reservation forests in Oregon.
The conference was in keeping with
the new policy of the forestry depart-
ment to get the benefit of the field
experiences of' its graduates. There
have been several similar conferences
previous to this and they will be held
as frequently as posible in the future.
Prof. Filibert Roth is enthusiastic
about the plan and feels that it will
strengthen the forestry courses ma-
terially, and will also help to solve
difficult problems that confront the
men in their work.
Graduate Gives Talk on. Big Bridges.
A talk on modern bridge building
was given before the Engineering so-
ciety Tuesday evening by R. G. Man
ning, '90E.' If the course of his re-
marks he described several famous
bridges which were erected under his
'supervision and according to his de-
signs.

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