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October 08, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ie

I

Vlchigan

Daily

ADDRESS

-,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1912.

INJURED

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Generally
fair Tuesday, moderate to brisk west
and northwest winds.
Ulliversity Observatory-Monday,
7 p. in., temperature 48.2; maximum
temperature .24 hours preceding, 68;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 48; average wind velocity, 12
miles.
ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY
IS ACTIVE AMONG STUDENTS
At the fall meeting of the local anti-
tuberculosis society, held in the new
medical building yesterday, plans were
iaid for a vigorous membership com-
paign among the students to assist in
disseminating information about tuber-
culosis and in selling the Christmas
red-cross stamps. Washtenaw county
will be thoroughly surveyed within
the next three months by a visiting
nurse employed by the local branch
of the society in order to obtain a
complete description of conditions af-
fecting the prevalence of the white
plague.

to

by lad who
promising
remity po-
ball team,

PAMPHLET SHOWS UNION TO SEEK
STUDENTS'GRADES MEN ON FACULTY

as the

Sun-
near

vardj
911

EILL INCREASE
BULLETINWORK
of. Brumm Arranges to Enlarge
Scope of Weekly Announcement
of Univer-sity

I .H 1

FACULTY TO GIVE NEWS.I

prac- ASKS
able

get into his According to the plans of Asst. Prof.
John R. Brumm, who has charge of
ed in Satur- the University Bulletin and the cam-
will probably paign of newspaper publicity growing
e game until out >f the old News-Letter, all fea-
aps not then. tiures of the work are to be greatly ex-
he had brok- tended this year.
arm, but an Last year about 80 mimeograph let-
de yesterday ters were sent to the smell papers of
:uries than a the state and were quite generally us,
injured mus- ed. Direct letters were also sent to
ent, however, a number of large eastern papers.
[ve work for This year, however, a Grand Rapids
firm, claiming to print patent insides
rterback can- for most of the small papers of the
bruised arm state, has agreed to use considerable
practice for a matter furnished from Prof. Brumm's
just recover- bureau. This will enable him to pre-
is arm, Yost pare much more material for the east-
rterback ma- ern papers and more feature articles.
ontest Satur- The University Bulletin is to be con-
tinued this year, and an effort will be
f the Varsity made to make it of greater value than
With a num- heretofore. Cards have been sent out
it of it, Yost from the President's office to all mem-
i, but limited bers of the faculty requesting them to
and passing notify that office of all public an-
f dozen men. nouncements, special lectures, con-
scheduled to certs, recitals, and the like.
reserves and The College Magazine, of New York,
game.Wheth- recently contained an article of a his-
vill send his torical nature on the University of
ore this time Michigan by Prof. Brumm which was,
one of a series of articles running in
that publication on American universi-
ties.
[ FORM Faculty members have been invited
N SOCIETY to contribute discussions to the ed-
ucational department of the New York
peaking stu- Times, a paper having considerable
ng at 617 For- circulation among college men. No
ed a Latin- restrictions are placed upon the nature
all of the of the subject.
tin-American --
se of the or- PROF. SCOTT WILL LECTURE
cuss matters TO VASSAR COLLEGE GIRLS

Tables, If Made Publie, Would Provide
Valuable Informationas to
Easy Courses.
THIRTEEN GET PERFECT MARKS
Pamphlets showing the percentage
of different grades given at the June
examination were distributed among
the faculty members yesterday. If
it were possible for students to obtain
copies of the book, they would serve
as valuable guides to the "pipe" cours-
es, for the tables show the grades
given by each instructor in the literary
department. To prevent "snap" cours-
es from becoming over-crowded, thel
pamphlets are being kept strictly sub-
rosa by the faculty.
Thirteen students in the literary de-
partment finished last semester's work
with perfect grades in every subject.
of this number, five were seniors, two
were juniors, four were sophomores
and ,two were freshmen.
The total number of marks given
was 9,673, of which 14 per cent was
A, 33 per cent B, 40 per cent C, 10 per
cent D, and 3 per cent E. Incompletes
numbered 60 and absences from ex-
aminations, 172.
The tables were compiled by Reg-
istrar Hall and they are said to be the
first of their kind from an institution
as large as Michigan.
NEGRO EDUCATOR TO AWAKEN
NEW INTEREST IN HIS RACE.
Booker T. Washington, in Lecture
Here, Will Show Effect of
His Work in South.
The awakening of a wider and more
intelligent interest in the education o01
the negro is the chief object of Book-
er T. Washington's visit to Ann Arbor
next Monday According to ti Tus-
keegee Southern Letter, the tour of
the noted educator will have the effect
of showing just what work is being
done for the benefit of the negro.
The letter is in part as follows:
"Beginning at Ann Arbor, Principal
Washington plans to make an eight-
day tour through the State of Michi-
gan, touching all the principal cities
of the lower peninsula.
"During the years that this institu-
tion has been sending out graduates
and students into every part of the
south, it has not only greatly extended
its influence but correspondingly In-
creased its responsibilities, until the
time has now arrived when the school
must in some 'way considerably in-
crease its sources of income or it will
not be able to follow up the work it
has begun or to fulfill its peculiar mis-
sion in the life of the race and the
south."
MANY WILL GO TO CHICAGO
FOR BIG TEACHERS' COUNCIL
Prof. F. N. Scott, head of the rheto-
ric department and president of the
National Council of Teachers of En-
glish, predicts an attendance of 500
teachers of English, at the second an-
nual meeting of the Council, to be held
in Chicago, November 29-30. The gen-
eral sessions will begin' Friday morn-
ing and close Saturday noon. Friday
afternoon will be devoted to meetings
of the sections, which are as follows:
Elementary, secondary, college, nor-
mal school, public speaking.
The principal topics to be discussed
are as follows: Grammatical Nomen-
clature, Types of Organization of High
School English, Books for Voluntary
Reading, Dramatic Work, and Material
Equipment. Action will be taken with
regard to a national syllabus and with
regard to measures for relieving teach-
ers who are overburdened with written
work.

Would Prefer to Have Son Join Good'
Fraternity Than Spend Time
In Lecture Hall.
DR. ,JACOBY TO SPEAK AGAIN.'
Henry C. Adams, Jr., '13, has been
appointed chairman of a committee to
canvass the faculty for Michigan Un-
ion memberships. To date some 60 fac-
ulty men have taken out memberships,
but this number together with the 50
or more faculty members who have
subscribed for life memberships does
not bring the total up to a figure at
all proportionate with the entire num-
ber of faculty men at Michigan. It
is hoped that a personal solicitation,
will result in a great increase in the
faculty membership of the Union for
the year 1912-13.-
Other members of the Faculty cam-
paign committee are: literary depart-
ment, R. C. Dexter, '13; Harold Doug-
as, '13; Edgar Mowrer, '13; John Reig-
hard, '13; William 'P Daugherty, '13;
engineering department, S. R. Trues-
dell, '13E; G. F. Wicks, '13 E; Bruce
Anderson, '13E; law department,
Burke Shartel, '13L; medic depart-
ment, Charles Kennedy, '13M and War-
ren Vaughan, '14; homeopathic depart-
ment, Norman Starr, '13H; dent de-
partment, Fred Thosold, 15 dent;
pharmic department, D. K. Stricklan
'13, pharmic.
Members of this committee are, ex-
pected to attend the membership ,cam-
paign smoker this evening at th Un-
ton.
FOUR WOMEN STUDENTS NO
TAKING ENGINEERING ORK.
Secretary Says Admitting of Gi is to
Department Has Proved
'Sncess I est.
The engineering department n w
boasts of four women students. 'p1 s
Itary engineering. Miss Quick, 'iSE,
who is enrolled in the civil depart-
ment took all the regular freshman
work, including shop. Miss Goff, '14E,
and Miss Peters are enrolled in the ar-
chitecture' course.
Miss Hamilton is intending to use
her knowledge of sanitary engineering
in settlement work or to engage in
business with her father.
According to the secretary of the
engineering department, the experi-
ment of admitting girls to their de-
partment has been highly successful,
the women students sometimes out-
stripping the rest of the class in their
marks. Miss L. R. McComber, '04, was
the first woman to graduate from the
engineering department.
DEAN WILLIAMS OF COLUMBIA
TO LECTURE IN CHICAGO.
Educators interestted in journalism
will gather at Chicago, November 29,
for the annual meeting of the Associ-
ation of Teachers of Journalism. Prof.
Fred N. Scott, president of the associ-
ation, has announced that Dean Tal-
cott Williams, of the Columbia School
of Journalism, will address the asso-
ciation on "Technical Instruction in
Journalism."
GRILL ROOM AT THE UNION
IS TO BE OPEN EVENINGS.
Every evening from 9:00 to 12:00
and on Sundays from 10:00 to 12:00
o'clock, the grill room at the Michigan
Union will be open. Short orders of
all kinds will be served. The Union
is open to ladies Saturday evening and
Sunday noon and evening. At these
times a regular dinner will be served
the guests.

SOCIALISTS TO FORMULATE
PLANS FOR TEAR TONIGHT.
The M1ichigan chapter of the Inter-
collegiate Socialist society will hold its
first business meeting Tuesday even-
ing at 7:00 o'clock at the Unitarian
church. Officers will be elected for
the ensuing year and an outline of
study adopted. The parlors of the
church have been secured for this
semester for meetings every other
Wednesday evening beginning October
16. All members are urged to be pre-
sent at tonight's meeting.
COUNCIL INTERPRETS NEW
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
At a meeting of the Senate Council
last night, it was held that the require-
ments for graduation passed last June
applied only to students entering the
university this fall. Professors Lloyd
and Markley werre elected members
of the Senate committee and Profes-
sors Demmon, Canfield, Bonner, Bige-
low and Guthe were elected on the
Library committee. Degrees were
granted to those who finished their
work during the summer- session.
GERMN SCHOIR
/ OPENS LCUTR
,apt. Hailmbaugh Announces That Two
Cups Will Be Awarded This
Year's Winners.
SQUADS TO TRAIN EVERY DAY
"If I had to choose between allowing
a boy to join a fraternity of. good
standing and sending him to lectures,
I should choose the former," said Dr.
Guenther Jacoby of the University of

CLI

FIX

ATHLETIC AUTHOR
THAT RULES IN El
MUST BE OBSERV]
TESTANTS WILL B]
DOUGLAS TO COAC
All Candidates Will H,
Certificates on H4
College Wo
With the schedule ma
proved and only the I
practice needed, the int
series is slated to sta
At a meeting of team
last night, final instruct
out and Coach Douglas
Manager Milligan state
authorities had decided
of each contest must be
the team would not be
pete. Several of the ma
appear and unless~ they
interest at once their
rred.
added feature to
year ill be in the coa
the te ms. Coach Doi
charge of all the squa
he has overseen one or
the team will not be eli
reason all managers a:
get into communication
arrange dates for coaci
who were not present
meeting must see Milli
One o fthe ruls of

Greifswald, Germany, in his lecture
at Tappan hall last night. "Dante,
Goethe, and Shakespeare lived too long
ago to have a social influence on liv-
ing men. The old classical writers are
\for one's reflective moods, but living
men can get more out of life by imi-
tatihg the best of their contemporar-
ies. Cultural education does not nec-
essarily rean 'efinement. Its object
is merely to deyelop one's conscious-
ness."
As in former years, the Regents have
placed funds in the hands of President
H. B. Hutchins for the bringing to
Ann Arbor of distinguished foreign
scholars to lecture before the univer-
sity. Dr. Jacoby, who has been in
the United States for some months
investigating the departments of phil-
osophy and psychology in the leading
American universities, is the first vis-
itor this year.
His lecture last night, which was
under the auspices of the Education
club, was the first of a series of six
which he will deliver in Ann Arbor
this week, The others will be given as
follows: This afternoon, "Bergson,
Pragmatism, and Schopenhauer;" to-
morrow, "Pragmatism in Germany;"
Thursday, "The English, the American
and the German Ideal of Manhood,"
under the auspices of the Deutscher
Verein; Friday, "A New Movement in
German Thought;" Friday evening,
"A philosophy of Working Assump-
tions," under the auspices of the Aco-
lytes. All the lectures except the one
on Friday evening will be held in the
Economics lecture room at 4:30
o'clock. The latter will be held at
7:30 p. m. in room 205 North wing.
The lectures are open to the general
public.
Last Year's Grad Teaching at Manilla.
Charles Christoph, '12 is now teach-
ing English at the University of Man-
illa, in the Philippines.

e by

The athletic authorities are exi
ingly anxious that the various
quirements be cleared up at qnce
Coel Douglas has been given au
ity to disqualify any team faili
this regard.
Following is the schedule fo
series:
First Preliminaries :-
Junior engineers vs. soph engi
October 17.
Senior engineers vs. winners,
ber 24.
Junior lit vs. soph lits, Octob(
Senior lits vs. winners, Octobe
Junior medics vs. soph medic
tober 19.
Senior medics vs. winners, O
26.
Junior laws vs. senior laws, O
21.
Dens vs. pharmics, October 22
Winner of dent-pharmic vs. w
of law game, October 28.
Semi-finals :-
Lits vs. engineers, October 31.
Medics vs. winners of dent-pha
law game, November 1.
Campus Championship:-
The final game to decide the
pionship is to be played the mo
of the Penn game, November 9.
GRAND RAPIDS CLUB PLANS
TO HOLD OPENING MEE
The Grand Rapids club, which
,membership of 65 university me:
hold its firs dinner of the year
Michigan Union, Friday evening
program will start at 6:30 o'cloc
all members of the club are ur
be present. Tickets may be ob
from the committee in charge.

Prof. Fred N. Scott of the rhetoric
department will lecture on "Learning
Life From Literature" at Vassar Col-
lege October 18. While in the east
Prof. Scott will also visit the new Pul-
itzer School of Journalism at Colum-
bia University, and complete the ar-
rangements for the lecturers who are
to appear before his classes in jour-
nalism this fall and winter,

neeting will be
which the work
more definitely

Of Course You've Bought Your

AT'S

H

T

There's the Point
One to the folks-it'll save lots of explanations in ycur letteis lacre; lettur tlan
ream of stationery.
One to her-you understand why she'll be interested in your school and it's record
Oce to that old chum-if he's in another college it'll show him his mistake in no
choosing Michigan.
One to that younger boy-perhaps he's in high school, anyway it's bound to intere
him in favor of Michigan, and ten to one if you send him a What's What he'
be here next year. Send four What's What away today, the edition won't la
long, 25c Per Copy, Postage 3

e You Sent Several Away?

-

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