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December 10, 1912 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1912-12-10

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I

Local $2.0
Mail $2.50

The

Michigan

Daily

i
Local $2.00
Ptail $2.30

R

I 14

Vol. XXIII, No. 60.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1912.

PRIOR FIYN

_.._

ANNUAL REPORT
.ON FINANCE IS
MADE DYUNION
'Awakened Rameses" Proved Largest
Money Maker of Year, Netting
Organzation More i
Than $2,000.
TOTAL DEFICIT AMOUNTS TO $293
Management Hopes to Realize Neat
Sum From Revenue Arising From
New Dance Hall.
Figures showing the financial oper-
ations of the Michigan Union for the
school year 1911-'12 were made public
yesterday by Homer Heath, graduate
manager of that institution. The re-
port reveals a total deficit of $293.26
for the year.
"Our policy has always been to give
our members' one dollar's worth for
every dollar they spend," said Mana-
ger Heath yesterday. "The Union is
essentially not a money-making or-
ganization. For instance we made on-
ly a little over $6.00 on our restaurant
last year, simply because we gave full
value for every cent received. The
same is the case this year.
"Of course, in the matte of dances
we must need make a nominal gross
profit to help cover our overhead ex-
penses. The Saturday evening dances
are paying well, and if the attendance
keeps up to near the maximum
throughout the entire year, we hope to
realize $1,500 on the dance floor alone.
"Not nearly all of this amount can
be accredited to th profit side of the
ledger, however. We had to increase
our mortgage by $9,000 to erect the
addition in which the dances are held.
The interest on this amount must be
paid out of the receipts, and we further
hope to use part of the ramainder to
help pay off $2,500 of our total mort-
gage at the end of the year."
In the report which follows, the item
"employees' wages and meals" includ-
es the salary of the manager, as well
as the'wages and meals of the cashiers
and janitors. Under the head of
"maintenance and general expenses"
are included fuel, water, light, insur-
ance taxes, interest, printing and sta-
tionery, newspapers and magazines,
repairs, etc.
The statement is given herewith:
Restaurant--
Receipts..............$15,271.29
Expenditures............15,264.62
6.67
Cigars and Cigarettes-
Receipts ................ 1,696.88
Expenditures.............1,420.70
276.18
Billiards and Pool-

THE WEATHER MAN

ATHLETIC BOARD DECLINES TO
DISCUSS CONFERENCE MATTER
The board in control of athletics I permanent and stable university or-

__ .

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Tuesday,
generally fair with rising tempera-
ture; moderate westerly winds.
University Observatory- Monday,
7:00 p. m., temperature, 26.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
39.6; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 12.2; average wind velocity
17 miles per hour.
For assets, the Michigan Union has
a building purchased and furnished at
a cost of $39,265.05. The establishment
is valued considerably below this at
present, however, and in the case of
building a new structure for a club-
house, comparatively little could be
realized on the present house. There
is no endowment, except small con-
tributions received from subscriptions,
junior hop balances and senior class,
balances.
The Union has liabilities of $23,-
500.00, in the form of notes for
$2,500.00 and mortgages for $21,000.00.
Although no general solicitation has
been made for the building fund, con-
siderable money has been contributed.
Two thousand dollars has been do-
nated from class memorial funds, for
fireplaces, etc., in the proposed edifice,
and 220 participating life. memberships
have been sold, on which over $10,000
will be realized within 10 years.
The advisory council of the Alumni
association has advised the campaign
committee in charge of the Union
building project that the latter should
obtain $200,000 in pledges before a
general solicitation could be instituted.
The committee is at present endeavor-
ing to secure this amount, and as soon
as it is raised the campaign for funds
will begin in earnest.
Prof. Pillsbury Meets Classes Again.
Prof. W. B. Pillsbury, of the psy-
chology department, who recently suf-
fered an attack of acute indigestion,

met last night and in a lengthy session
debated and passed upon several mat-
ters of more or less importance. The
business brought up was nearly all
routine work and aside from the
band proposition, nothing startling
was done: Several committees were
appointed to work out various mat-
ters and these will be decided finally
at the next meeting of the board.
The proposition of western compe-
tition was discussed before the board
and the following statement given out
in regard to it, namely that the ques-
tion of western competition has been
and is receiving attention at the hands
of the board of control. Beyond that
no information was given out, the
board believing that the campus re-
alized that such work could be best
done without the glamor of publicity.
The petition from the student coun-
cil in regard to financing the band was
brought up and a ?committee was ap-
pointed to devise the best possible
means of forming the musicians into a

ganization. The committee was also
asked to investigate thoroughly the
whole matter and ascertain how much
the athletic association should advance
toward the support of the band work-
ing upon a new basis.
Perhaps one of the most important
moves made by the board was a reso-
lution deploring the playing of univer-
sity students in Sunday semi-profes-
sional football and recommending that
action be taken by the faculty in re-
gard to the matter. It was the opin-
ion of the board that the playing of
such students reflected discredit on
the university and was distinctly pro-
hibited by the athletic rules. The in-
dividual cases . under consideration
were referred to the faculty of the dif-
ferent departments where the men are
enrolled.
Sveral matters of minor importance
were discussed'and put over until the
next meeting, when it is expected
much more work will be accomplished.

FRESHMEN WOMEN TO HAVE
JUNIOR ADVISORS AT ONCE..
Plan Among the Men Is Working Out
and Seniors Should Sign
up at union.
Interest in the new student advis-
ory system has been rapidly increas-
ing the past few days, and it is now
certain that the fresh lits, women as
well as men, are to be taken care of.
It is also probable that the plan may
meet with favor in the engineering de-
partment, as Pres. Ed. T. Lazear, of
the seniors said last night that the
matter would be taken up at the next
class meeting.
Freshmen women are to be provided
with junior advisors, and those who
wish to volunteer for the work are
urged to notify Dean M. B. Jordan at
once. A meeting of prospective junior
women advisors will be held Thursday
at 4:30 o'clock in Barbour gym, at
which Dean Effinger and Professors
M. P. Tilley and C. 0. Davis will out-
line the plans.
Names of senior lit men are rapidly
being placed on the list of groups of
freshmen at the desk at the Michigan
Union. All senior lits who wish to
offer their services as advisors are re-
quested to select the group they wish.
to take at once.
FRESH MEDICS WILL .MEET
TO VOTE ON HONOR SYSTEM

FRATERNITIES
TO BEGIN. WOI
ON JUNIOR H

i

was able to resume
day.

lecturing yester-I

SUFFRAGE CLUB
WILL BE FORMED
Mas Meeting Called for Wednesday
Night at Union to Boost
Voting Bills.

DEAN

BATES WILL SPEAK.

Receipts............ 147
Expenditures . 23
124
Candy and Gum-
Receipts.................184
Expenditures .... ...13

7.60
3.00
4.60
4.58
9.21

45.37
Employees' wages and meals.. 2,795.58
Maintenance and general expenses..
... ........... .....4,168.18
6,963.76
Received from nembership dues ..
. ...................3,187.50
The Awakened Rameses (Opera) -
Receipts ... . . ........:.... 5,559.53
Expenditures ............3,221.48
2,338.05

Interest has been aroused to such
an extent on the campus over the pro-
posed suffrage bill for Michigan stu-
dents that a mass meeting will be held
on the question at the Michigan Union
tomorrow night at 7:00 o'clock. Dean
Henry M. Bates, of the law depart-
ment, will outline the bill and talk on
the constitutionality of it. Prof. David
Friday, of the economics department,
will speak on the general need and
demand for suffrage and Louis Haller,
'14L, will present the student view-
point of the measure.
The main purpose of the meeting is
to arouse enthusiasm among the Mich-
igan students, and everyone will be
asked to sign a cardenrolling in the
University of Michigan suffrage asso-
ciation, giving the name of their home
town andtcounty. The representatives
of all of the districts will be asked to
cooperate and see that it is brought
to the attention of the legislature in
the winter. Every student will also
be asked to see that their representa-
tive has knowledge of the subject and
to create interest in their home towns.
Sentiment among the faculty is in fa-
vor of the proposed bill and many of
them have promised to attend the
gathering tomorrow night.
At a meeting of the drafting com-
mittee yesterday afternoon details of
the bill were worked out. The major-
ity of the committee were in favor of
a general bill to apply to all absent
voters and it was decided to draft two
bills, a general one, and one applica-
ble only to students. It was undecided
which one to push and it was thought
best to put it up to the meeting tomor-
row night and see which one has the
best opportunity of being passed by!
the legislature.
There will be a meeting of all of the
committees this afternoon at 3:001
o'clockat the Union.

QJUAKE RECORDEDl
AT OBSERVATORY
A seismographic disturbance, last-
ing 23 minutes, was recorded on the
two instruments of the university ob-
servatory early this morning, and has
been corroborated by a telegraphic re-
port from Georgetown University,
Washington, D. C. No word has as
yet been received, locating the disturb-
ance definitely, but Observers Mitchell
and Corliss at the observatory esti-
mate that the scene of the shock must
be 2,700 miles away, probably either int
Mexico, the West Indies, or Alaska.
Beginning at 2:44 a. m., central
standard time, the disturbance lasted
until 3:07 o'clock yesterday morning,
the principal shock being recorded at"
2:52 a. m. The displacement of the'
tracing point on the recorder was}
about an inch, afid the direction in a#
general north and south line.
It was stated at the observatory last
night that, while the intensity of the
disturbance was, in general, moderate,
it must have been a severe shock.
Having been comparatively short int
duration, however, it is not thought
that any great cataclysm attended the1
shock.
PUBLIC DRAMATIC RECITAL ;
TO BE GIVEN THIS EVENING.f
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's class inf
dramatic reading will give a public
ecital this evening, consisting of about
a dozen selections of a miscellaneous
character. The entertainment will be
held in room 302 N. W., beginning at
8:00 o'clock. The following -memberst
of the class will take part:
Mildred Guilford, '13, Elsie Seitz, '14,
Madeline Bird, Amanda Strom, '13,l
Helen Magee, '14, Gladys Boise, '13,
Roda Stutevant, graduate school, E.
M. Wisdom, '13, Elmer Riebel, G. H.
Chizum, '14, J. H. Wilkins, '14, W. W.<
Wheatley, '13, and Joe Turpin, '14.
THOMSON AND ALLMENDINER
PLACE WITH ALL-STAR TEAMS
At least two Michigan football men
have gained merited recognition by
eastern newspapers in the selection
of their All-American football teams.
The "Post-Standard," of Syracuse, in
selecting their men, placed Allmen-
dinger at guard on the second eleven,
in which position he played such a1
scrappy game for Michigan. Full-
back on the All- American second team
picked by the New York "World" was
given to Capt. Thomson, who starred
for Michigan this fall. Both men well
deserve this honorable mention.
PROF. DE MURALT RECEIVES
APPOINTMENT ON COMMITTEE
Prof. C. L. de Muralt of the electric-
al engineering department has Just
been notified that he has been appoint-
ed by the president of the American
Institute of Electrical Engineers, to
serve on the power station committee.

PROFESSOR TAYLOR
SPEAKS AT UNION
Present day sociological problems
formed the topic of an interesting talk
by Prof. Graham Taylor, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, at the Michigan
Union gathering Sunday afternoon. Dr.
Taylor made numerous references to
his work in connection with uplifting
the condition of the working classes.
"When yo% find rotten conditions in
certain districts of a city," declared
Prof. Taylor, "you can invariably
trace the cause to bad politics. The
solution of the matter seems to lie
in the hands of young and wholesome
men. College men imbued with
with the importance of social con-
sciousness, can do wonders in clean-
ing up the scandalous conditions
which seem to be incident to municipal
government.
"It is evident that the corporations
cannot be trusted to look out for the
welfare of their employees. Take the
case of Gary, Ill., where the great
steel plant is located. In the mills
themselves you will find everything
conducted on perfect business princi-
ples, but go a half-mile back and look
at the homes of the workingmen em-
ployed in these model factories. There
you will find living accommodations
as primitive as were ever present in
frontier life. Filth and crudeness are
everywhere."
DRUIDS TO INITIATE NEW
MEN WITH SOLEMN RITUAL
Five awenydds will be initiated into
the order of wise men among the sen-
ior lits this afternoon when the Dru-
ids hold their second fall initiation.
Instruction in the ancient mysteries
of the society for the five neophytes
will not be held at the sacred Druid
rock as is customary in more favor-
able seasons of the year.
COUNCIL COMMITTEE WILL
REPORT ON CLASS STANDING
The student council will hold its
regular fortnightly meeting this even-
ing at 7:00 o'clock in room 302 N. W.
At this time the report of the commit-
tee which was appointed to draw up
regulations concerning the standing
of the different classes will be heard.
Other current business will also come
before the meetipg.
Chemical Society Will Elect Officers.
The American Chemical society will
elect officers for the year at the regu-
lar monthly meeting to be held Thurs-
day at 4:00 o'clock in room 151 of the
chemical building. At the session Dr.
J. S. Laird will speak on "Acclusions
in Electrolytic Silver and the Electro-
chemical Equivalent of Cadmium."
Junior Engineers to Give First Dance.
Junior engineers. will hold their in-
itial dance of the year tomoorrow night
at the Michigan Union. Mr. and Mrs.
H. F. French will act as chaperones.

If

Adopted, Committee Will Draw up
Pledge to Present to
Faculty.

The fresh medics will meet tomor-
row to decide upon the honor system.
The session is to be held at 5:30
o'clock in the east lecture room of
the medical building. If the measure'
meets with approval, a committee will
be named by Edgar Beardslee, presi-
dent of the class, to draw up a pledgea
to be submitted to the faculty.
As in the case of the other classes,
the pledge will contain a promise to
refrain from cheating by receiving
or giving help in classes, and further-
more to report anyone who is seen
breaking the promises of the pledge.
It was with the medics that the system,
was first sucessfully tried in 1904.
ORATORS TO TRY
OUT FOR PLACES:
Preliminaries in Big 'Peace Oratorical
Contest Will Take Place
Tomorrow.
TEN SPEAKERS WILL COMPETE.
Preliminaries in the Peace Oratori-
cal contest have been set for Wednes-
day, the committee last night grouping
the ten entries for the elimination
trials. There are to be two prelimi-
naries, from which five of the ten
speakers will qualify for the final con-
test. Both preliminary contests will
be held in room 302 N. W., and will be
open to the public without chanrge.
From the afternoon contest, which
will be held at 4:30 o'clock, two men
will qualify, from the four speakers;
and in the second contest, to be held
at 7:30 o'clock, half of the six entries
will be eliminated from the final con-
test.
The order of speaking and the sub-
jects for the afternoon contest are:
Paul B. Blanshard, '14, "The Evolution
of Patriotism;" Paul D. Doherty, '14L,
"The Dawn of World Peace;" C. C.
Chang, '15, "Republican China and the
World Peace;" and J. W. Harding,
'14L, "The Armed Peace of the United
States."
At the evening contest, the following
will speak in the order given: H. C.
Tallmadge, '14, 'The Disarmament of
Nations;" N. H. Goldstick, "15L, "The
Making of Peace;" Wm. C. Scott, law
special, "The Pan-American Congress,
and Its Influence Upon World Peace;"
S. S. Grosner, '14L, "Our Country's
Call; Elmer Riebel, '13, "The Dis-
grace of the Senate;" and A. J. Boesel,
'14, "The Coalition Method."
At 'the meeting of the Oratorical
board yesterday afternoon, it was de-'
cided to hold the final contest Decem-'
ber 19 in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall.
Ex-Congressman Edwin Denby, '96L,
of Detroit, will preside.

First Business Meeting of This Yea's
Representatives Will be Held
This Afternoon at Chi
Psi House.
COMMITTEES ARE ANNOUNCED.
Willis A. Diekema, Alpha Delt, to Act
as Chairman; Kohler Chosen
by Independents.
Actual work -on the J-hop, the rep-
resentative event of Michigan's social
ear, will begin today. Most of the com-
mitteemen from the various fraterni-
ties have been chosen, while the jun-
for lits selected Frank E. Kohler at a
meeting yesterday afternoon to repre-
sent the independents.
The offcers and committees have
been chosen according to the rotation
plan which it is customary to follow.
According to this system, Willis A.
Diekema, Alpha Delta Phi, will be gen-
eral chairman and a member of the
decoration and invitation committee.
George B. Duffield, Delta Kappa Epsi-
lon, will lead the grand march in the
capacity of chairman of the reception
committee. The first business meeting
of the officers and combined commit-
'tees will be held at the Chi Psi house
this afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.
- The officers and committees which
have been chosen are as follows:
Secretary, Harold C. Tallmadge, Sig-
ma Alpha Epsilon; treasurer, John .
Lippincott, Delta Upsilon.
Reception committee: George B.
Duffield, Delta Kappa Epsilon, chair-
man, V. Hudson White, Phi Delta The-
ta, and A. Eckert, Phi Gamma Delta.
Arrangements committee: L. F.
Campbell, Zeta Psi, chairman, George
N. Maurer, Sigma Nu, Gordon C. El-
dredge, -Theta Delta Chi, and Theodore
L. Locke, Delta Tau Delta.
Decorations committee: Morris A.
Milligan, Kappa Sigma, chairman, and
Owen B. Winters, Alpha Tau Omega.
The other member will be chosen tot
day from the Psi Upsilon.
Invitations committee: Wendel L.
Smith, Beta Theta Pi, chairman, and
Henry Hart, Sigma Phi. Phi Kappa
Psi will choose the other members to-
day.
Chaperone committee: Philip Jan-
sen, Chi Psi.
Music committee: John Cory, Sig-
ma Chi, chairman, and Frank E. Kohl-
er, independent.
Bids on all departments of work will
be opened after the 'olidays.
Sigma Xi Hear Address by Dr.Ruthven
Speaking of the objects and accom-
plishments of the university expedi-
tions into Mexico, Nevada, and the
western -United States, Dr. A. G. Ruth-
ven, curator of the museum, gave the
principal address at the first open
meeting of Sigma Xi last night. The
lecture was illustrated and gave in
detail the various collections that were
gathered on the expeditions.
CLEVELAND CHEMIST WILL
TALK ON CARBON PRODUCTS
"The Manufacture of Carbon Prod-
ucts" is the subject of a talk to be giv-
en to chemical students tomorrow af-
ternoon, by B. Dyer, of the National
Carbon Co., of Cleveland. It will del
with the preparation of dry cells and
other carbon products; The lecture
will be held at 11:00 o'clock in room
303 of the chemical building.
Toledo Engineer Will Address Society
Chief Engineer George Tomson, of
the board of public service, Toledo,
will speak before the engineering so-ci

ety tonight at 8:00 o'clock in room
348, engineering building. iis sub-
ject will be "Asphalt and Other Plas-
tic Paving."
The Prescott club will hold its ini-
tial dance of the year at Barbour gym
Thursday. Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Hub-
bard and Dr. and Mrs. J. S. Cummins
will act as chaperones.

Music-
Receipts ................
Expenditures ............

1,106.39
590.96

515.43

Book--
Receipts .................-
Expenditures .............

154.15
120.50

33.651

House committee expenditures. .57.70
Net receipts from dances.......194.00
Total loss for the year, in depart-
ments showing loss . .......7,021.00
Total gain for the year, i& depart-
ments showing gain . ....6,728.00

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