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December 05, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

00I
$2.50

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Daily

Local $2.00
flail $2.50

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1912.

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PRICE FIVE CENTS

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THE 13WEATHIER

MAN

MICHIGAN'S

TROUBLE WITH

lADE FOR
ECONTEST
That This Number Will
eased by Several
-s Which Have
en Delayed.
1) BROTHER OF
R WINNER ENTERED

iary Contests Will
on Mednesdmy,
Dec. 11.

Be

!r
Forecast for Ann Arbor-*Thursday,
cloudy and unsettled; no marked
change in temperature.
University Observatory - Wednes-
day 7:00 p. m., temperature, 36.$;
maximum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 46.8; minimum temperature,
24 hours prebeding, 33.0; average
wind velocity 7 miles per hour.
NOTED SOCIOLOGIST TALKS HERE
Prof. Graham Taylor of Chicago to
Speak at Union Sunday.
Prof. Graham Taylor of Chicago
university will be the principal speak-
er at the Union meeting next Sunday
afternoon.
Prof. Taylor has been connected
with the Chicago Commons social set-
tlement for some time and is regard-
ed by many as the most noted -sociolo-
gist in America. He .served on the
famous Chicago vice commission, and
was a member of the board which set-
tled the recent miner's strike. He is
also associate editor of the Survey.
The usual refreshments and "smok-
es" will be on hand and music will be
furnished by several well known song-
sters.
NEW TALENT FOR
OPERA REVEALED

ators filed manuscripts in the
ntest last night, with secre-
Mohr, of the Oratorical as-
It is also possible that a'
ave not yet reached him, and
otal of contestants will reach
efore the preliminaries are
-eliminary contests will be
Vednesday, Dec. 11, in room
r The men will be divided
groups, one contest being
:00 o'clock and another at
i The final contest will be
19, at which time Michigan's
itive will be picked for the
test at the Michigan State
ollege, Ypsilanti, Mar. 24.
a who have entered and their1
re as follows: C. C. Chang,
iblican China and the World
Vm. C. Scott, law special,
-American Congress, and Its
Upon the Western Hemis-
.llan J. Boesel, '14, "The Co-
ethod;" Elmer Riesel, '13,
grace of the Senate;" H. C.
e, '14, "The Disarmament of
J. W. Harding, '14L, "The
eace of the U. S.;" Paul B.
, '14, "The Evolution of Pa-
Nathaniel H. Goldstick,
Making of Peace," and Paul
,y, '14L, "The Dawn of World
S. Grosner, '14L, writer of
of the new song, "Hail
' also handed in an oration,
bject was attached to his
t. Percival V. Blanshard,
both the state and national
or Michigan last year. His
one of the entries this year.
RISTMAS DANCE
TEBOARDS SELLING FAST
for the junior lit Christmas
d dance, to be given at the
-Union Dec. 18, are selling
y rate. Admission cards for
couples will be disposed of,
it of the limited capacity of
dance floor,uand from pres-
itions this number of paste-
il be sold by the end of the

CONFERENCE DESAN- IN '0520O6

Second
ing

Tryout Brings Forth Rromis-
Material and Elimination
Will Begin Soon.

(Editor's comment-This statement
ence to the files of the Alumnus and
1905. If there are any inaccuracies,
hopeful that these facts are near to
eip and save the article for future
The initial impetus for the with-
drawal of Michigan from the Confer-
ence started back in the winter of
1905-06 because of legislation follow-
ing the calling of the "Angell Confer-
ence." Athletics in the west previous
to this time had assumed such propor-
tions that competing schools were re-
sorting to accusations against each
other of a nature not conducive to the
welfare of either the schools or their
athletics.
Following the suggestion of Dr. An-
gell, the presidents of the Conference
colleges met to consider the athletic
situation with reference to the follow-
ing reforms advocated by the Michi-
gan representative: (1) Fewer games,
(2) Reductions in expense; (3) Ref-
ormation in game itself.
As a result of the meeting, the
fresh eligibility rule was extended to
one year instead of six months, and
eleven rules were adopted of which
the following were the most import-
ant: (1) Five games; (2) Fresh and
scrubs to play no outside games; (3)
Not more than 50 cents to be charged
for seats; (4) NO TRAINING TABLE;
(5) Non-brutality rules; (6) No pre-
season practice; (7) No games after
the second Saturday before Thanks-
giving. (8) Coach to be a faculty
man.
THESE RULES AS ADOPTED
WERE PUT UP TO THE CONFER-
ENCE WITH THE ALTERNATIVEs
OF EITHER ADOPTING THEM OR
SUFFERING FOOTBALL TO BE
ABOLISHED FOR TWO YEARS,
This legislation was referred back
to the institutions in the Conference
for their vote. The Senate here adopt-
ed the rules BUT INTERPRETED
THE THREE YEAR RULE IN THE
LIGHT THAT IT WAS NOT MEANT
TO BE RETROACTIVE. The other
schools throughout the Conference
also adopted the rules which at once
became binding.
Discussion immediately started at
Michigan in respect to the RETRO-
ACTIVE feature of the three year eli-
gibility rule, the training table, and
the five game limit. The board in
control here decided against the po-
sition of the Conference in regard to
these rules. The feature that Mich-
igan most objected to was the effect
the former rule would have on the
eligibility of five or six of the Michi-

has been prepared by careful refer-
TheC )lichigaii Daily dating back toy
we will weic me 4orrectioiis. We are
perfect, and suggest that our readers
reference.)
gan football and track stars, who
would have been barred by the retro-
active workings of the rule. Accord-
ingly, Michigan sent letters to the
other schools expressing the decision
that it would abide by all the Confer-
ence rules except.
(1) The retroactive feature of the
three year rule.
"(2) The abolition of the training ta-
ble.
(3) The five game limitation (Mich-
igan wanted seven).
In these letters Michigan made it
clear that its action was not intended
to embarass any schools which want-
ed to schedule games with Michigan
and at the same time abide by the
Conference rules.
As a result of the agitation, the
old board of control, consisting of
five faculty men chosen by the re-
gents, and four students elected by
the athletic association, was abolished
by the regents, and a new board es-
tablished with final authority in the
regents.
Michigan, in the meantime, was still
nominally a member of the Confer-
ence, and the larger schools made ef-
forts for Michigan's active participa-
tion. Some of the smaller schools
continued to cling tenaciously to the
rules as adopted, although Chicago,
Iowa and Minnesota, are said to have
worked or a modification for the
benefit of Michigan.
After the reorganization of the
board of control at Michigan, and the
improbability of a return if the rules
had to be adhered to, the Conference
at a session in Chicago, in January,
1908, decided that all schools not
complying with the White resolution
by February of the same year, should
not be considered, thereafter, mem-
bers of the Conference. The White
resolution was to the effect that uni-
versities in the Conference which
failed, to follow a two-thirfs rule,
should be automatically eliminated.'
In anticipation of the rule, the
Michigan board of control metin Ann
Arbor, and IN FEBRUARY, 1908, OF-
FICIALLY WITHDREW FROM THE
WESTERN CONFERENCE.
Since 1906 the rules have changed
at both Michigan -and in the Confer-
ence, so that many of the old differ-
ences have disappeared. The RETRO-
(Continued on page 4.)

TO REHEARSE AFTER HOLIDAYS.
Although only ten men were present
last night It the second tryout for'
cast parts in the 1913 Michigan Union
opera, the material revealed was cred-
itable, and the stunts performed by
the candidates give promise of plenty
of novelties for this year's production.
The first tryout was attended by 30
aspirants, so it is a certainty that
there will be no dearth of capable
Thespians.
Before the next tryout, which will
probably be held next week, one-third
of the men who have reported so far
will be eliminated from competition.
The more fortunate two-thirds will be
given another opportunity to display
their ability and the discarding pro-
cess will continue until the squad of
tryouts can be reduced to a working
basis.
Actual rehearsals will not begin un-
til after the holidays. When the book
for the opera is in condition for use
parts will be tentatively assigned and
the candidates will be expected to
compete for permanent 'positions.
Menp who have appeared inpformer
Union operas will be required to con-
test for the roles with the "cub" try-
outs, and the' parts will not be definite-
ly assigned until a few weeks before
the date of the first performance.
The regular rehearsal of the dancing
chorus tryouts was held yesterday af-
ternoon at the Union.
NEW SONG TO BE INTRODUCED
AT INFORMAL FISHER PARTY
Through a mistake, it was announc-
ed in The Michigan Daily that the
Fischer party to be given tomorrow
night would be formal. The managers
have decided definitely that the dance
will be informal. The new piece which
Fisher has written especially for the
J hop this year entitled "Just One Lit-
tle Dance in Your Arms" will be heard
in Ann Arbor'for the first time. Tick-.
ets for the party which .is the sec-
ond of the series may be secured by
calling 319 or 236.

MICHIGAN UNION MEMBERSHIP
DINNER TO BE HELD TONIGHT
Addresses Will be Made and "Mimes"
Will Present Sam Adelsdorf
in German Monologue.
The December Michigan Union
membership dinner will be held this
evening at 6:00 o'clock. A few of the
admission tickets remain to be sold
and can be secured at the Union office
today. An informal reception of the
members has been planned for 5:30
p. m. in the parlors of the Union. The
dinner will be served promptly at 6:00
o'clock and an excellent program of
entertainment has been arranged by
the committee. Men from the faculty
and student body, who are well known
in all lines of campus activity, will
discuss current questions. 'The
Mimes" will present Sam Adelsdorf,
'14L, in a german monologue. Tick-
ets are selling for 40 cents, and all
members are urged to attend.
League to do Christmas Sewing.
Christmas sewing will be featured
at the Women's League party this
week. All come with needle and
thread and Christmas cheer, Friday af-
ternoon at four, at Barbour gymna-
sium. There will be the usual danc-
ing until six.
TURKS KILL NO
CHRISTIANS YET
A. J. Koumjian, '14, Who Has Heard
From Armenia, Says Turks
Are too Busy Now.
MAY START MASSACRES LATER.
Word to the effect that the Turks
have not started to massacre the Ar-
menians has been received by A. J.
Koumjian, '14, The letter, however,
was written three weeks ago and ex-
pressed grave fers of a possible mas-
sacre.
"While the Turks have not as yet
massacred any of my countrymen, it
is no sign that they will not," said
Koumjian last night. "The Turks are
too busy now with preparing for war
and consequently have not had time to
kill any of the Christians. The situa-
tion is mighty serious and just as
soon as the fighting is over the Arme-
nians are sure to get it from the re-
venging Turks. The letter states that
the inhabitants of the country are in
a constant state of fear and expect
massacres to come at any time."
None of the other Armenians or
those that live in the district where
the fighting is have received any
word from home for over three
months.
"All of us are in great anxiety over
the war and we all fear for our fam-
ilies" declared A. S. Gvrigian, 15,
"Massacres are undoubtedly going on
now on a small scale although report
are to the contrary. The Turks will
do anything to kill a Christian and
our countrymen are suffering now. I
wish that I was back there where I
could kill some of those Turks."
DAILY MEN BANQUET AT UNION.
First of Series of Social Events Oe-
curred Last Evening.
Ye editors dined at the Union last
night, the occasion being the first so-
cial event of the season for the Daily
staff. "Joe" Fouchard, business man-
ager, presided, calling on repre-
sentatives of the different staffs for
short talks.
The following responded: Frank

Pennell, Dean Effinger, Louis R. Hal-
ler, Carl Hughes, Maurice Toulme,
Leo Burnett, Otto Hans, and Prof. F.
N. Scott.
The Daily will give two more staff
dinners and a banquet during the
year. A dance is also being planned.

DEVELOP NEW
SOCIAL PLAN
FOR LEAGUE:
Wives of Professors Will Informally
Entertain University Women
In Their Homes Through
out the Year.
FACULTY WOMEN TO DIVIDE
TERRITORY IN TEN PA RITS.
Women will Have Opportunity to Meet
Their Professors in Inform-
al Gatherings
The latest movement of the Wom-
en's League to add to the social life of
university women, and bring them in-
to closer contact - with profes-
sors and professors' wives, has,
culminated in a series of "at
home" days to be held during
the year by a number of faculty wom-
en. The movement is an expression
of the desire of the faculty ladies, as
well as the college women, to come in
closer touch with one another.
The territory is to be divi;ed into
about ten parts, and the faculty ladies
from each division will get together
and plan some day when they will -
receive college women in their homes.
By this arrangement, the women will
have an opportunity to come into di-
rect contact with all of their profes-
sors at some time during the year.
Senior girls will help receive, and the
junior girls will aid in bringing fresh-
men to the affairs.
The affairs will be entirely inform-
al, the women coming directly from
classes.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB TO HOLD
BUSINESS MEETING TOMORROW
An important busienss meeting o
the Corda-Fratres Cosmopolitan club
will be held tomorrow at 7:30 o'clock
in room 202-203 University hall. Ques-
tions of unusual importance will be
discussed at this meeting. Among
others on the list are the plan for the
international congress ,to be held in
San Francisco in 1915, the sending of
a delegate to the Association Cosmo-
politan club meeting which will soon
convene at Ithaca, and plans for the
new club room. The election of cer-
tain officers and also of new members
will take place after the discussion.
Honprary Chemical Society Initiates.
At the initiation of the Phi Lambda
Upsilon honorary 'chemical society
Tuesday. evening, Acting Dean A. B.
Stevens was admitted to honorary
membership and A. E. White was
made an associate member. The act-
ive members initiated are as follows:
J. C. Brier, Frank D lHaskins, E. C.
Sherrard, Arthur F. Schlichting, Wil-
liam P. Wood, Carl K. Wirth, J. L. Mc-
Cloud, Newton Lamb, Arthur Hart,
and G. Fritch.
Sphinx Hold Annual Fall Dance.
Members of the Sphinx society will
hold their annual fall party at Gran-
ger's this evening at 9:00 o'clock.
Thirty-five couples are exp'ected to
attend. No special features have been
announced.
ELIMINATION OF CANDIDATES
FOR VEREIN PLAY IS BEGU
By a process of elimination the
number of eligibles for the. Deutsch-
er Verein play has been cut down to
about 25 but no definite cast has been
selected. This is to be accomplished

by a final tryout to be held in the near
future at which those selected will be
given an opportunity to perform in
different roles to determine for which
they are most fit.

NEW DIRECTORY PEEVES GERALD

N EDITORS.I

[1 hold a meeting in
N building tomorrow
0 o'clock. Two as-
' the Michiganensian
ominated. Standing
.eport and other im-
will be brought up.
(AGES ANNUAL
NT ON SATURDAY.

"Hello-he-l1-lo. Is this Gladys?"
"Y-e-s"-sound of molars champing
a quid of gum-"is that you, Freddie1
dear. Say, there's going to be a
swell--"
"What the-. Say, who is this any-
way?" (Business of fumbling through
a Stude Directory.) "Isn't this the
Gaby-Gaby sorority?"
Cessation of gum-chewing-"Wha-a
-a-t? , Why, this is the Brown Duck
Laundry."
"Isn't this 89678546?"

yond recognition, that the telephone
numbers were not all accurate; that
the book even had the audacity to sep-
erate members of the same family and
string their names through the book.
Out of twelve friends whom he asked
casually regarding their names in the
directory, five stated that there were
errors in their names. One fraternity,
man told him that most of the broth-
ers had new names since the Stude
Directory appeared.
Gerald was up here complaining to

ua members will stage
1 rabbit hunt Saturday.
n is one of the year's an-
ants and the trip to Whit-
e will occupy the entire
cted to lure' all the Indians
accustomed Saturday pur-

"Sure it is, but it ain't no sorority." us today: "This is some book, believe
Bang! (Numbers and names disguised, muh," said Gerald, straightening his
gentle stude.) tie with the barber-pole complexion.
Gerald, somewhat peeved at his at- "Like unto that Biblical donkey of
tempt to get results, determined to yore, ye Stude's Directory is fearfully
pursue the matter to the bottom and and wonderfully made. And they
find out, just what kind of a book the read the proof three times. Ye Gods!
great -Stude's Directory was. He And they raised the price ten cents.
.found that the names of some of his That would buy two whole---" Ger-
friends were left out entirely, that the ald's voice faded into an inarticulate
addresses of many were garbled be- sigh.

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