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December 03, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-12-03

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he

II

Mic fgln

Daily

Local $2.00
flail $2.50

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMIER3, 1912.

PRICEI FIVE CE

i I- -

7

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor- Tuesday,
fair and colder;, brisk to high south-
westerly winds shifting to the north-.
west.
University Observatory -- Monday,:
7:00 p. m., temperature 29.1; maxi-'
muns temperature 24 hours preceding
53.2; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding 29.1; average wind velocity
18 miles per hour.

WITH REAL FACTS AT HAND, EDITORS
WORK FOR MICHIGAN'S RETURN TO FOLD

to

L AID WORK. J e. LITS PLAN XMAS FUNCTION.

Societies

attitude of the
sed suffrage for
>se interested in
e are preparing
e-wide agitation
Correspondence
vith prominent
lty and student
educational in-
the state, and
behalf of the
,1 be solicited.
.er, of the eco-
direct the cam-
ad much mate-
ected from the
nizations on- the

Juniors Will Give Combined Dinner
and Dance December 18.
Junior lits will gather in full force'
at the Michigan Union, Wednesday,
December 18, for a combined Christ-
mas dinner and',dance. The women of
the class will be present at the din-
ner, as well as at the dance, and both
sexes will be represented among the
speakers at the former.
On account of the limited capacity
of the Union dance floor, tickets will
only be issued for 100 couples. Wom-
en's single admission to the dinner'
will be 50 cents, and admission for
men will be by series ticket or 65,
cents single ticket. Tickets may now
be obtained from members of the so-
cial committee.
Helen Loman, "Heinie" Hoch. and
"Gord" Eldredge will give short talks
following the dinner, and the musical)
part of the program will be furnished
by Phyllis Dunn, Mildred Taylor and'
"Waldie" Fellows.
PATERSON"TO BE
VIARRITY ICAPTAUIN

While the "Big Nine" was going on
record Friday and Saturday in Chicago
to the effect that the main barrier be-
tween the Conference and Michigan
was faculty control of athletics, with
the question of the training table,
merely incidental, the Alliance of
Western College Newspapers came
to the unanimous conclusion that fac-
ulty control was the incidental differ-
ence and a phase of the training ta-
ble question, the main bone of con-
tention. This conclusion was arrived
at after a two days' discussion of con-
ditions at the six, schools represented.
At the meeting were A. H. Ogle, ed-
itor, and C. B. Conrad, athletic editor,
of the Daily Illini; C. F. Wernicke,
editor, Wisconsin Daily News; Frank
Pennell and Karl Matthews of The
Michigan Daily; 11. J. Doermann, ath-
letic editor, Minnesota Daily; H. L.
Kennicott, editor, Chicago Daily Ma-
roon; and P. H. Walsh, editor, and H.
L. Wilson, of the Daily ] orthwestern.
That the faculty is better repre-
sented in matters athletic at Michi-
gan than is the case at Minnesota was
brought out by H. J. Doermann, who
was sent to the meeting by the Root-
er's club of the Gopher school. Mr.
Doermann is in intimate touch with
conditions at Minnesota, being a mem-
ber of the board of control of athletics
as well as a sport writer of some
note. He is a student and the athlet-
ic editor of the Minnesota Daily.
"At Minnesota," said Mr. Doermann,
"the faculty has the power to veto on-
ly, which, to the best of my knowl-
edge, has been seldom, if ever, exer-
cised. Legislation is entirely in the
hands of the board, and this board is
predominatedly, a student board. Ev-
en the niinutes are not given over to
the faculty senate. It would seem
that at Michigan, with four faculty
men on the board, the faculty exer-
cises more actual power than at Min-
nesota."
As a result of their investigation,
the six newspapers are starting a pub-
licity campaign for the reinstatement
of Michigan in western athletics, with
the following facts as a basis.
First--Competition between Michi-t
gan and the Conference colleges is
desired by the students and alumni
of the Conference colleges is well asj
by Michigan.
Second-After reviewing the con-
ditions at the several colleges, we
have decided that the points at issue
are: A-Faculty control of athletics.
B-Training table.

Th ird--The Faculty Control-Con-
ference rules provide for "full and
complete faculty control of athletics."
But in at least one Conference college,
Minnesota, students are in virtual
control. At Minnseota, the board of
control consists of two faculty men
appointed by the faculty senate, two
alumni, and eight students elected by
popular vote. The only power held
by the faculty is that of veto and not
of legislation.
At Michigan we find the following
situation. The board consists of four
faculty men chosen by the heads of
departments, the graduate director of
athletics, three alumni chosen by the
board of regents of the university, and
but three students appointed by the
student "board of directors" which
is composed of the graduate director
of athletics id the team members,
who are elected by the student body.
Further, the board of regents, a body
appointed by the governor of the state,
has final authority.
We believe that this system IS THE
SAME IN SPIRIT AND PRACTICE,
although not identical in form, as at
the Conference colleges. We believe
then thiat this matter IS A MATTER
OF MERE TECH:NICALITY AND
THAT THE REAL POINT AT ISSUE
LIES IN THE MATTER OF THE
TRAINING TABLE.
FOURTH-THE TRAINING TA-
BLE--The training table system at
Michigan is as follows. A private in-
dividual runs the table for profit,
charging each member of the Varsity
squad asigned to the. table by the
coach, $4.00 per week. Whatever de-
ficit arises is made up by the athletic
association, this deficit being about'
$800 for the past year. In at least
two Conference schools, a so-called
training table exists, where the team
m embers eat together but pay the full
anout of the board. It is generally
conceded and we believe that these
tables conducted in this fashion are in
accord with the spirit and letter of
the Conference rules. HENCE,
,FIFT!-THE ACTUAL DIFFER-
ENCE BET'WEEN MICHIGAN AND
TIlE CONFERENCE LIES IN THE
FACT THAT THE MICHIGAN ATH-
LETIC ASSOCIATION CONTRIB-
UTES PARTIALLY TO THE SUP-
PORT OF THE TRAINING TABLE.
IF THIS FEATURE CAN BE ELIMI-
NATED THERE REMAINS NO LOGI-
CAL GROUND FOR THE FURTHER
SEPARATION OF MICHIGAN AND
TH E CONFERENCE COLLEGES.

HOOSIER STUDENTS TO FORX
NEW ORGANIZA TION TON IGHT
Students from Indiana will meet at
a smoker to be held at the Michigan
Union tonight, and effect the organi-
zation of an Indiana club. Officials
will be elected, and a constitution and
by-laws adopted. The speakers for
the occasion are "Morie" Myers, C. S.
Boucher, Professors H. P. Thieme,
Gordon Stoner and S. F. Gingerich.
JAPAN SOCIETY OFFERS PRIZE.
Cash Will be Given for Best Essay by
Michigan Student.
Pres. Hutchins yesterday was no-
tified by the Japan society, of New
York, that through the generosity of.
LindsayRussell, '94r, the organization
is enabled to offer a 'prize of $1.00 for
the best essay on some subject relating
to Japan written by any student in the'
University of Michigan.
Essays submitted are to be at the
disposal of the society for publication
and are not to exceed 5,000 words in
length. The papers should be sign-
ed by a pseudonym, the name and ad-
dress of the author being in a sealed
envelope attached to the manuscript,
and should be delivered to Registrar
Hall before June 1, 1913.
The award will be made by the
president of the Japan society or his
representative, Dean Bates, and Prof.
Reeves. The list of subjects and in-
formation on the contest may be ob-
tained from Pres. Hutchins.

NEW

of the pro-
ri taken by
us political
'13L, of the
s the fran-
ief that the
ite law will

UNION OPERA
WILL CONDUC
FINALTRYOD
New Candidates to Sing and Pei
Stunts Tomorrow Evening
Before Members of
Mimes Club.

BOOK BEING PE

'

LECTURER WILL
SPEAK 1ON DRAMA
Miss Marie Ware Laughton, of Boston,
to Appear in Oratorical
Course Tonight.

Star Center for Past Two Seasons
Elected Yesterday by Squad
of Football Men.

enL. Yv e

t we can mus-
measure and
ping with the
essive league,
leal of litera-
gested by the
te campaign."
,he Woodrow
y in favor of
,", said Jared
esident of the
t. "We stand
easure, and it
r our aid to a
iterest in the
campus and
ocialist chap-
favor of stu-
res. Maurice
tainly endorse
hat it is wrong
oney to send
1at the same
ought to be
n Arbor with-

PNTTS WAS ONLY OPPONENT.
George Cornell Paterson, '14E, of"
Detroit, will captain the 1919 Michi-
gan football team.
Paterson was chosen to guide the
fortunes of next year's Varsity at a
meeting of the 17 wearers of the 1912
football "M" following the taking of
the annual football picture early yes-
terday afternoon. Paterson was elect-

TO

DISCUSS AMERICAN PLAYS.I

Miss Marie Ware Laugahton will lec-
ture on the modern drama in Univer-
sity Hall this evening at 8:00 o'clock,
under the auspices of the Oratorical
association. Miss Laughton will deal
with some of the larger issues of the
present dramatic situation in Ameri-
ca, discussing the Irish players and
their influence on American drama

Contest Will be Arranged to Obi
Drawings for Production's
Annual Poster.
Final tryouts for cast parts in
191 Michigan Union opera will t
palce tomorrow evening at 7:00 o'cl
at the Union. At this time All m
who did not report at the first try
will be given an opportunity to s
their ability.
As before, candidates will be exp
ed to perform some stunt or s
some song before the Mimes at torn
row night's tryout. Although 30
were present at the first meeting,
actual rehearsals- have been C(
menced, and parts .will not even
tentatively assigned until later in
month.
According to Philip Fletcher, '1
general chairman of the 1913 op
the tryout Wednesday evening will
absolutely the last chance for ii
men to appear before the judges a
exhibit their talent.
All music for the opera must be
the hands of the general chair'
by tonight. Most of the melo
have alrpady been subniitted, but a:
composers have failed to turn in ti
productions to date.
Dancing chorus rehearsals are c
tinning every Tuesday afternoon
5:00 o'clock, and Wednesday at 4
From 15 to 40 candidates are pres
at every rehearsal. Preliminary pr
tice willl last until Christmas, wi
more definite work will be dealt
to the limb artists.
At present the book for next y
opera is being revised and whip]
into perfect shape, so that when th
in charge are ready to assign pa
there will be a minimum of confus
and delay. Preparation for the difi
ent roles will not begin until after
holidays.
Details of the annual poster cont
customarily held in connection w
the opera, will be announced n
week. As usual, all contributions a
be examined and passed' upon b3
board of judges, and prizes will
offeredor the drawings. which pr
most suitable for posters.
SCALP AND BLADE SOCIETY
GATHER IN ELEVEN NEW X1
After experiencing the custom
ordeals of initiation, eleven mem:
were added to the roll of the k0
group of the Scalp and Blade soce
a .sectional organization of stude
in the university from. Buffalo, w
that organization held its annual ir
ation at the Union last Saturday.'
following were taken in: M. D. Be
ley, H. E. Orr, NY. Dunn, W. N. C
nelly, W. S. Girvin, J.' Brode,
Harding, J. Ludwig, W. S. Conne
G. Williams and Rex Brown.
Phoenix Club to Banquet Novice
The Phoenix club will have their
itiation dinner at the Union this e
ing. Toasts by Harold Todt, "S
Lorch, "Matt" Matthael, and "Bu
FerrandYwill constitute the infor:
program. The dinner is given in b
or of the following initiates: C.
Madden, '14P, F. C. Matthaei, '14, L
Buckindale, '15E, H. H. Smith, 'I
A. J. Bancroft, '16, D. R. Blakeslee,
G. C. Curtis, '16E, G. J. Ferrand,.'1
D. A. Grahm, '16, E. G. Munz, '16E,
F. Robinson, '16E, N. Rosenzw
'16E, and E. F. Runge, '16.
Educational Club Hear Prof. Whit
Prof. A. S. Whitney, of the de
ment of education, read a paper be:
the Educational club yesterday eve
on the aim and formulation of a 1
school study course. He pointed
just what the high school curricu

i

w,

es will be
row night
es will be
ill be dis
for $1.00
1 commit-]
e sold at
rapidly.
> 100. The
Prof. and
and Mrs.

a series of staff dinners
een planned for the en-
ill be held at the Union
ening by The Michigan
ers of the board in con-
nt publications, tryouts,
of both staffs will attend
aking it one of the larg-
by the paper. Several
the faculty who are in-
1e paper will be present
't in the short program

"Bubbles" Paterson.
ed over Miller H. Pontius, '14L, of
Circleville, 0., who was the only other
man nominated for the honor.
"Bubbles" Paterson will play his
third season of Varsity football next
year. For the past two seasons Pat-
erson has held the pivot position on
the Michigan Varsity, where he has
demonstrated that he is a cool, capa-
ble and consistent player. During the
time he has served on Michigan's Var-
sity, Paterson has won the respect and
admiration of the players and student
body as well, and, in the opinion of
the entire Wolverine football support-
ers, his ele;tion is well deserved.
Previous to his connection with the
Varsity team, Paterson played on the
All-Fresh eleven of 1910. Before that

MICHIGAN LOOMS
STRONG IN WEST
Tables explaining the geographical
distribution of the student body of the
principal American universities and
colleges for the year 1910-11 as com-
piled by Prof. Rudolf Tombo, of Co-
lumbia university, have been pub-
lished in the last edition of "Science."
Although conditions have changed
materially since 1910, it is interesting
to note the widely-scattered portions
of country in which Michigan predom-
inates. .Of the western universities,
Michigan has by far the strongest
hold on the North Atlantic states, at-
tracting 638 students (as against only
394 in 1905) to Wisconsin's 96, Ohio's
86, and Illinois' 76.
In the south and central division,
Michigan comes third in prominence,
being preceded by Texas and Colum-
bia. From Kentucky, Michigan draws
more students than any other outside
college. The university also has the
third largest following in Illinois,
Kansas and Nebraska. In the far
west, leaving California and Leland
Stanford out of consideration, Michi-
gan is well in the lead being followed
by Harvard and Columbia aid North-
western. In Colorado, New Mexico,
Nevada, Montana, and Oregon, Michi-
gan leads the list.
America, according to Prof. Tom-
bo's figures, is still far behind Cer-
many in the matter of attracting for-
eign students to its colleges. From
1905 to 1910, Michigan showed a gain
of 62 foreign students, Illinois 120

TURKS THREATEN
ROBERT COLLEGE.
Word has been received from Mrs.
J. R. Allen, wife of Prof. J. R. Allen,
of the mechanical engineering depart-
ment, by her mother Mrs. B. J. Con-
rad to the effect that Robert College is
in great danger of being attacked by
the ravaging Turks. Massacres are
sure to come if the Bulgarians suc-
coed in taking Adrianople and Cha-
taidja, and Robert College will suffer.,
A portion of the letter which was
written November 12, portraying the
horrors of the war follows:
"War, pestilence and famine-we
have had them all since we came to
Turkey 18 months ago. There is
cholera in the city now. As to the
war game, no big battle has been
fought since the one at Lule Bengas.
Both sides seem to be getting ready
for the last great decisive battle, and
if the Turks lose, and the army be-
hind the Chataldja lines is forced
back to the city, woe betide us. The.
government has promised to do all
that is possible to keep the retreating
army out of Constantinople, but the
question is, 'can they?' There are now
about 100,000 men on the Chataldja
lines, and if they retreat in a panic,
as they have been doing, how is any
sublime port going to stop them?
"We expect to stay in Robert Col-
lege until it gets too dangerous. Last
night the American consul sent us
word that if we were afraid, we were
to go on a vessel the English have
chartered for refugees, and that in
case of immediate danger we were to
be 'taken to the English gunboats.

Marie Ware Laughton..
and reading parts of "The Playboy of
the Western World," by Synge; Mae-
terlink's "Sister Beatrice," Kenedy's
"The Terrible Meek," and "The Pig-
eon," by Galsworthy.
Miss Laughton is principal of the
well-known School of English Speech
and Expression in Boston, and is one
of the few who have made an art of
dramatic reading. She has lectured,
and read in all the larger cities, and
her work has been one of the great in-
fluences in the Drama League move-
ment throughout the country.
Miss Laughton lately has been in
Detroit, where the'Twentieth Century.
and other clubs have joined heartily
with#her in her efforts, and have
formed a local club of the Drama.
League. It is only because of aid
from these Detroit organizations that
the Oratorical association has been
able to secure this evening's engage-
ment.
Members of the association will be
admitted on their memberslip tickets,
and tickets for the general public will

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