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November 30, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-30

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50

The

Michigan

Daily

I AILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

52.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1912.

PRICE FIVE

1-1,

ITORS UNITE TO

ATHLETIC SITUATION

itives of Four Conference
, an of Michigan, Meet
i C~cago to Form
Alliance.
WELCOME TO MICHIGAN
f College Press Expect to
iplish End in View by
Use oi' Publicity.
an Daily Staff Special.)
O, ILL., November 29.-
Western Conference putter-
closed doors at the Auaito-
the editors of the college
four of the big schools,
Conference, and represen-
n The Michigan Daily, gath-
La Salle hotel and formed
the. sole purpose being to
adjustment of western ath-
3, and to get the Wolver-
a a place in the West.
like a bomb out of the
this gathering swept the
Chicago like wildfire. As

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday,'
generally fair and colder; moderate to
brisk westerly winds.
IUniversity Observatory - Friday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 36; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 38;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 27; average wind velocity, 13
miles per hour.
ly by the Conference schools. Michi-
gan's boycott, whiph has been in force
since the winter of 1910-1911, was con-
demned by all. It was declared to be
fairly tyrannical and not within the
keeping of good sportsmanship. While;
all of the editors favor the return of
Michigan to the "fold," they do not
feel that the Wolverines should be
subjected to a "freeie out" game if
they cannot see their way clear to en-
ter the Conference again.
Mutterings of ridicule were current
when this meeting was first announc-
ed, but with its session today they
have changed to expressions of won-
der. That this plan and meeting,
conceived by students and put into
effect by the efforts of a single college
daily, should reach maturity,-and a
maturity that amounts to something,
-is almost beyond the comprehen-
sion of the sceptics of college journal-
ism. Its results today are conceded'
to be the biggest triumph of college
newspapers, and its work is bound to
be watched with interest by Chicago
at least.

STUDENTS ARE ENGAGED IN
INYESTIG ITON IN DETROIT
Members of Sociological Class Study
Conditions Among the
ILower Classes.
The Associated Charities of Detroit
has called to its aid students enrolled
in the sociology class conducted by
Prof. Charles H. Cooley, to make per-
sonal investigations of vagrancy, and
conditions under which many of the
dwellers in the poorer quarters of De-
troit live. The evidence obtained by
the student investigators will be com-
piled by the Associated Charities
for statistical purposes, and the stu-
dents will be required by Prof. Cooley
to avail themselves of their observ-
ations in preparing their regular t-he-
ses.
"The investigations being conducted
in Detroit are entirely voluntary on
the part of the students assigned to
the work," said Prof. Cooley. "I call-
ed for volunteers some time ago, and
about 40 offered their service. I se-
lected five students, giving preference
to those residing in Detroit, because I
thought the research work would be
of value to them, since it was conduct-
ed in their home city. They will make
individual investigations, and will not
be restricted. They go to Detroit
whenever time permits, and gather
facts independent of ,each oth zer."
FRESH MEDICS HOLD FIRST
D)INNER AT MICHIGAN UJNION
Fresh medics dined at-the Michigan
Union last evening, about 65 members
of the class responding to the oppor-
tunity to get acquainted. Dr. R. Fl.
Mc otter, followed by Dr. A. F. Hurl-
bert, both of the medieal faculty,
spoke on the honor system. E. A.

Prominent chemists to the number
of 75 or more, will visit Ann Arbor
next Friday to attend the meeting
of the American Institute of Chemi-
cal Engineers. At 12:30 p. m., Friday,
a complimentary luncheon will be
served at the Michigan Union.
The regular program 'will be held
in the chemical amphitheatre, com-
mencing at 1:30 o'clock. Papers will
be presented by many well-known
chemists, including a stereoptican
lecture by Prof. M. C. Whitaker, of
Columbia University, and a talk by
G. W. Thompson, chief chemist of the
National Lead Co., New York. The
meeting will be open to the public.
The regular meetings of the insti-
tute will be held at the Hotel Cadillac,
Detroit, from Wednesday to Saturday
next week. They will be attended by
nearly all of the chemical engineer-
ing faculty members, some of whom
will deliver papers.
WILL CHANGE HOUR OF MEETING
Tuesday Gathering at Newberry Hatl
to Begin at 4:30 O'clock.
Beginning next week, the regular
Tuesday afternoon meetings in New-
berry hall will commence promptly
at 4:30 o'clock instead. of at 5:00 as
formerly. The principal speaker at
next week's meeting will be Dr. Pet-
tit, of Ypsilanti.
On Monday afternoon, at 4:30, there
will be an informal tea for Cabinet
members at Newberry hall.

c(HExISTS ivLL ARRIVE IN
CITY FRIDAY FOR MEETING.
Conlvenlion of ('hiemical Engineers to
be Attended by Over 5
Prominlent MIen.

CONFERENCE FAILS TO ACT
AS TO RETURN OF MICHI

iestion of Mich-
o whether the
llowed to play
e editors' meet-
re importance,
the lips of all

-that senti-
ditors of the
of Chicago,
>rthwestern.
out, The
concerning

Beardsley, president of
ed as toastmaster.

the class, act-

VEREIN PLAY TRYOUTS PROCEED
Cast Will be Selected by Committee
of Faculty Members.
About one-third of those who had
signed up to try out for the Deutscher
Verein play did so yesterday after-
noon. The remainder will be given
an opportunity to try out, Monday af-
ternoon from 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock in
.room 203, U. H. Those who wish to
try out at this time are requested to
come as early as possible, regardless
of the time for which they have sign-
ed up.
The faculty committee which pass-
es on the candidates is composed of
Professors Max Winkler, E. A.
Boucke, T. J. C. Diekhoff, and J. W.
Schll. After the tryouts are over
this committee will select the cast for
the play from the tryouts, and also
from among those who were in last
year's play.
GUILD TENDERS BANQUET IN
HONOR OF CHINESE STUDENTS
A Chinese-American banquet was
given in honor of the Chinese students
by the Wesleyan guild, in the parlors
of the Methodist church last evening,
and more than 25 Chinese students at-
tended.
The assembly was addressed by Dr.
D. T. Smith, of the medical faculty,I
who spoke on "America's World4
Ideals." C. P. Wong spoke on "Chi-
na to America," and "China's World
Ideals" was discussed by S. H. Kee.I
Regent J. E. Beal, Dr. C. A. Barrett,E
of the homeopathic hospital, Prof. D.!
W. Springer, principal of the high1
school, and Evan Essary, school com-
missioner, were present
WILL SPEAK ON MODERN TURKEY'
Cerle Francais Course to Commence
Tuesday With Lecture.,
Mr. Harry Wann, instructor in
French, will begin the Cercle Francais
series for this year with a talk enti-F
tied "The Role of Occidental Educa-t
tion in the Development of Modern
Turkey," next Tuesday afternoon at
5:00 o'clock in Tappan hall.
Besides discussing the influence of
European -education, Mr. Wann will
go particularly into the effects of
American schools upon Turkish and
Balkan character and . educational
systems, and will, discuss the part
these schools have played in bringing<
on the present struggle, and in sup-t
porting it.l
Part of Mr. Wann's talk will be de-
voted to a discussion of the present
war situation and'the political chang-
es that it has already brought about
among the Turks, as well as among
their allied opponents. He will tell
of the lamentable condition of thel
once excellent Turkish army, and the
terrible ravages of cholera in its
ranks. The lecture will be given int
French.
PHYSICIANS WARNED TO BE
ON LOOKOUT FOR SMALLPOX

NEW RULES MAKE
FOOTBALL SAFER

SECOND' TRIO OF
DEBATERS NAMED

='I

what stand they,
ke, the first steps
vere made and an

Alliance of Western College
is tlte name of the new body,
purpose as set forth by its
s is to "fix" Conference diffi-
What "fix" means is to bey
tomorrow at a second session.
time today was needed to set
mors aright, and place the va-
terests on a common meeting
Open Student Campaign.
city is to be the medium of
x combine. The Saturday ses-
11 be devoted to making plans
eat campaign through the col-
f the college papers. What
and attitude this will take
to be decided. The differences
i the various colleges are
Michigan's rulings, which di-
conflict with the Conference,
red thoroughly and it is now
that an agreement among'
:ors can be reached whereby
work toward one end.
en a campaign among the 25,-
dents that are to be found in
schools will mean that some-
ill at least be commenced
astitutions want to be together
tics. They are not confident
e Conference offers the solu-
d they are prepared to take;
ter up on their own initiative.'
ill be done will depend on the
nce meeting largely, and it is
I that that body will do some-
ith the Michigan question to-
Meanwhile the editors are
g acquainted, learning each
conditions and getting up a
good fellowship that will ce-
hem together in the coming
was no spirit of frivolity at
ting. Each editor seemed im-
ith a 'determination to learn
do the work that is evidently
eglected by those in authority.
business took up the entire
and speeches were made by
representatives stating just
ch one felt on the question.
,e difficulties and the tangles
raightened out, and after that
ans were suggested, but for
t part these were left for the

CAMI S WATER MAIN TO BE
READY FOR USE NEXT MONT
Work on, the new campus fire main
is progressing rapidly and it is ex-
pected that it will be completed next
month. On account of the large tun-
nels for heating and lighting, a pe-
culiar system of excavation has been
employed in the construction of the
main. The pipes have been laid either
over or under the tunnels, in order
not to conflict with them..
The force for the new main is to
be obtained from the Blake fire pump
in the engineering building.
FRESH LITS WILL DANCE AT
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM TODAY
Fresh lits will hold a "Get Acquaint-
ed" dance at Barbour gym this after-
neon at 2:00 o'clock. Girls are re-
quested to come unescorted. Chap-
erones for the dance are: Prof. J.-S.
Custer, Mr. R. W. Cowden, Prof.
and Mrs. J. E. Reighard, Dean M. B.
Jordan, Prof. E. R. Turner, and Prof.
E. F. Hacker. Tickets for the dance
are 35 cents.
REGULAR UNION DANCE WILL
TAKE PLACE THIS EVENING.
Members of the committee for the
regular weekly dance at the Union
tonight are as follows: J. Austin Otto,
15E, chirman; H. Beach Carpenter,
'14; E. T. Pfohl, '14L; Wilbur David-
son, '13. The chaperones for the
dance will be Professor and Mrs. Hen-
ri . Hus, and Prof. and Mrs. J. L.
French. A good proportion of the
tickets for the dance has been dis-
posed of, but a number still remain,
and may be had by applying at the
Tinion desk.
MEN STUDEN'T'S WANT THEIR
FUSSING-- WOMEN APATHETIC

Figures Show Total of

Caused by Gridiron Sport
in 1912 Season.

But 10 Deaths

Paul II hiishard, J. S. McElroy
Sol Blumrosen Picked for
ITarIsity Team.

and

"BACK-LOT" GAME DANGEROUS I BANK REFORM QUESTION ARGUED

One good at least has been accom-
plished by the new football rules, if
the statistics compiled by The Detroit
News, regarding the injuries and
deaths as a result of the gridiron ac-
tivities this fall, are accurate. These
figures show only 10 deaths in the
country as compared with 14 in the
season of 1911.
Not a single college fatality has
been recorded. Physicians did not
attribute football as a cause of the
death of a member of the Yale squad
early in the season, so the college
game has a clean record.
The statistics follow:
Total Deaths.

At the Webster-Adelphi debate last
night, Paul B. Blanshard, '14, J. S.
McElroy, '131,, and Sol Blumrosen,
'13L, were chosen as members of the
team, which, with those selected at
the Jeffersonian-Alpha Nu debate last
Wednesday night, will represent
Michigan in the inter-collegiate debat-
es with Chicigo and Northwestern.
The first man named is from the Adel-
phi society while the last two debat-
ed with the Websters. W. W. Schroe-
der, '14, Adelphi, was selected alter-
nate.
C. F. Phillips, '14L, oratorical dele-
gate from his class, presided. The
judges were: Professors W. G. Stoner
and R. W. Aigler, of the law depart-
ment, W. A. Frayer, of the history de-
partment, J. R. Brumm, of the rhet-
'oric department, and L. D. Wines, of
the Ann Arbor high school.
The Varsity question for debate,
"Resolved, That the Plan of Banking
Reform Proposed by the National
Monetary Commission Should be
Adopted by Congress," was debated
last night.
The other members of the Varsity,
team who were chosen at the Jeffer-

Rumor Says Conference is Waiting
For Wolverines to Make First
Move in Matter of
Return.
FACULTY CONTROL MOOTED TOPIC
Believed That Conference May Grant
All Contested Points- Except
Faculty Direction. -
(Detroit Free Press Service.)
CHICAGO, [LL., November 29.-
Michigan and her relations with the
Western Conference were not definite-
ly settled at the meeting of that body
at the Auditorium here today. In
fact, no statement regarding the true
trend of the session could be secured.
The meeting was secret from start to
finish.
There were reports from authorita-
tive sources and these were all to the
effect that the Conference wants Mich-
igan back in the fold again. Just what
the discussion today amounted to was
not stated, but the fact that nothing
definite could be secured leads to the
conclusion that the Conference is
again waiting for somebody to make
the first move.
"We do not know officially that
Michigan wants to come back" said
a member of the Conference tonight.
"However, we understand that a rep-
resentative from Michigan will be at
our Saturday meeting."
Will Michigan Petition
That old question of whether Michi-
gan shall knock on the door, or wheth-
er the Conference shall send the en-
graved invitations, would seem from
this to be the crux of the whole difhi-
culty. In all the years that the W1-
verinies have been away, there has
neverbeen a Conference meeting
without some talk of Michigan, and
there has never been anything done.
The meeting today was merely a rep-
etition.
However, what tomorrow will bring
can not be foretold. I Michigan has
a representative here, it is understood
that the Conference will be glad to
hear the Wolverine statements It is
also felt that the Conference will
agree to the old training table rule,
if Michigan will return. But it is
equally certain that Michigan will
have to agree to a faculty control of
athletics before she will be admitted.
The Conference is rabid on this last
ruling. It will stick for it to the last
ditch. From this, those familiar with
the Michigan-Conference trouble be-
lieve that the chances for a reconcili-
ation are hardly as bright as they
would be with this matter left out of
the question.
Director Bartelme could not be
reached last night so that it was im-
possible to learn whether Michigan
will be represented at the Conference
meeting today. The athletic authori-
ties have refused to give out-any state-
ments and their policy is unknown.
CHINESE MISSIONARY WILL
LECTURE AT NEWBERRY HALL
Dr. Frank Keller to Speak on Sub ect
. of the Modern Occident
This Evening,
"The New China, and How it Hap-
pened" will be the subject of a talk
by Dr. Frank A. Keller, at an informal
reception to be held in Newberry hall
this evening. The address will deal
with experiences in China during the
last 15 years.
Dr. Keller left this country in 1897
as a member of the Chinese Inland
Mission. Since that time he has de-
voted his life to missionary work, and
since 1900 Dr. and Mrs. Keller have

concentrated their efforts on medical
and evangelistic work at Changsha.
Meets to Discuss German Literature.
The Journal club of the German
faculty held a meeting last night at
the home of Prof. Max Winkler. Ger-
man' literature from its beginning to
1550 was discussed by Prof. C. E. Eg-
gert, and from 1550 to 1880 by Prof.
W. H. Wait.

High school players.....
College players.........
Other players..........

1912
3
0
7
10-

1911
6
3
5
14

Totals

Causes of Death.

Body blows............
Injuries to spine........
Concussion of brain.....
Blood poisoning ..........
Other causes ..............
Totals.......... ....
Total Injured.
College players.........
High school players ......
Grade schools ............
Athletic clubs ............
All others ................
Totals .... . ............ .

3
0
1
0
6
10
17
9
2
8
0
36

'3
3
0
7

14 sonian-Alpha Nu debate on Wednes-
day night are: F. W. Moore, gradu-
40 ate school, B. J. Jonkman, '14L, and
20 L. S. Eulbert, '14L.
1 Michigan will debate Northwestern
6 and Chicago on January 17, the home
0 team meeting Chicago here, while
-- the remaining three men debate
67 Northwestern at Evanston.

KOH-I-NOOR WIELDERS WANT RR-E-VENGE

Because of the prevalence of small-
pox throughout the state, Dr. W. B.
Hinsdale, the medical director of the
homeopathic hospital, has issued a let-
ter to the members of his staff warn-
ing them to be on the lookout for the
disease. He emphasized the fact that
all cases showing symptoms of skin
eruptions, backaches, sore-throats,
dizziness and unaccountable fevers
should be segregated, especially if the
patients come from those parts of the
state which are already infected.
EASTERN ALUMNI FORMULATE
PLANS FOR ROUSING BANQUET
Plans are now under way to hold
a national banquet in New York City
for Michigan alumni, January 24, 1913.
The New York alumni have charge
of the preparations, and the event
will be the biggest of the kind ever
held in that city. President Harry B.
Hutchins will represent the university
on the occasion, and will make an ad-
dress.

According to all ruiors, the turmoil Rumorous rumblings of a student
succeeding the recent "anti-fussing" strike have filtered out from a certain
legislation at the Mississippi Agricul- building near Little Pittsburg, where
tural and Mechanical Institute has not grey toques talk of cozines, red ones
yet abated. Because President High-
tower refused to comply with their re- of differentials, white ones of bending
quests, 102 students walked out on a moments, and blue ones of tomorrow
strike. . The walk-out was started by night's dawnce.
the seniors, and they are being back- No, Agnes, the civils who are not
ed by all the other classes. Strange always civil haven't found another'
to say, however, the women stand by Berty to vent their wrath upon; no,
the faculty, this time it's the,-well it's the "its,"

say for the time being, who have
struck for more hours and less pay
under -somebody besides, well, besides.
Not that the wielders of the Koh-i-
noors and art-gum have really walk-
ed out; horrors no! They just want
a little consideration from the man
who says, "tomorrow we'll take-" and
then proceeds to keep them up 'til the
wee. sma' hours are no longer. wee
sma', just to earn an E.
They should worry!

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