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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 29, 1912 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

+iYilY:bwnrr ' rr

your Fall or Winter

Suit from the

largest line in the city.

Dress Suits a specialty

.H.

Wild

Co.

Tailors and Importers.
311 South State Steet

U

Scrag

Books

Our MichigaiScrap Book is the best on the Market for the money.
Look over our books before you purchase. We also have extra leaves
when you have it filled. If you have not hal a scrap book before start
now and get one at
Sheehan o.

THE1 fICHIOAN DAILY
Official newspaper at the University of Mich-
igan.
Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, under Act of Congress of March 3,
1879.
Offices: Second floor, Ann Arbor Press Build-
ing, Maynard Street.
Office Hours: Editor-i to 3 p. m.; 7mto 1o
p. mn. Business Manager-z to 3 p. mn.
Subscription Price: By carrier, $2.50; by mail,
$3.00.
Want Ad Stations: Press Building; Quarry's
Pharmacy ; University Pharmacy ; Davis
andaKonald's Confectionary Store.
Phones: Bell and Home, 960.
Frank Pennell............Managing Editor
Joseph Fouchard..........Business Manager
Maurice Toulme............. News Editor
C. Harold Hippler .............. Assistant
Karl Matthews . ..........Athletic Editor
G. C. Eldredge ..... .........Assistant
John Townley. ........Music and Drama
Maude ┬▒dwards....................Women
1: larold B. Abbott ................Cartoonist
EDITORIALS
Harold G. McGeeILouis R. Haller
Howell Van Auken Maurice Myers
R. Emmett Taylor.,......Edwin R. Thurston
NIGHT EDITORS
H. Beach Carpenter Fred B. Foulk
Morton R. Hunter ........Morris Milligan
Bruce f. Miles...........Ernest R. Burton
Lester F. Rosenbaum......)avid 1). I tunting
REPORTERS
fames l)'evlin.,....... ..... . V. weenylc
Leonard:1. Ri s r...... ..arold I'. Sco t
Leo Burnett ..............Fenn H1. I ossiek
F. M, Church...............Ca n Jenks
Charles S. Johnson.............C. 1. Lang
Bernus E Kline.,.......... R. Kistoer
Will Sh a iroth ............HIenryv C. 1Bugle
F. F'. \Ichijy ............C. S. John stoil
W. R. Melon.........Ralph E. Cunninghar
V. F. Jal)im.L1su........,....I. J. Runimel

STUDENT BO OSTORE

II

I

I

Wives and Sweethearts
Have a keen sense of the cigar
you smoke and the clothes you
wear. Bring them with you.
Dieterle
TAILOR Liberty Street
(Copyrighted)

CARDS - PROGRAMS-STATiONERY
SAMPLES
GREGORY MAYER & TH1OM Co. DETROr.C Mic

GOOD

LIG HT

IMAN

GOOD

EYES

I

Incandescant Gas Lamps Verticle
Brightest and Steadiest.

and Reflex are the

I

Special No Shadow Engineer's Drawing Lamp.

BUSINESS STAFF
A. R. Johnson, Jr........Advertising Mgr.
'merson Smith..........Accountant
aurence D. Bartlett.......Circulation Mgr.
Sherwood Field ..............John JLeonar-d
Harry . Johnson
FRIDAY, NOVEZMBER 29, 1912.
..Night Editor-Charles S. Johnson...-
STAFF APPOINTMENTS.
In keeping with the established cus-.
tom of Thanksgiving appointments,
the staff of The Michigan Daily is
augmented this issue with the names
of a number of new men. In many
cases, this recognition has come after
nearly a year of worK for the paper,
with the campus none the wiser.
In all cases, it has meant a lot of
hard work and sacrifice, and we usurp
this bit of space for the purpose of
thanking those men for their loyalty,.
and congratulating them on their at-
tainment of the goal long looked for-
ward to, and, with apologies for nat-
ural prejudice, quite worth while. +
THE HONOR SYSTEM.+
The demand for the introduction of
the honor system in examinations by
a number of students in Prof. Turner'sa
course, and the campaign for reform'
along the same lines which has arisen
Aimultaneously with it at the Univer-
sity of Illinois, poin' to a basic weak-1
Ness in the system of faculty supervis-
ion. We cannot close our eyes to thel
?act that cheating in examinations isl
far too prevalent, How many of us
ire there who can say, as do most of
the graduates of Princeton.; where thet
honor system is in force,~ that theyl
have never seen a case of cheating in
examinations? How many of us
would regard it as a low estimate that
thirty per cent of the students who
take an examination here, give or re-l
ceive aid? Suppose, circumstancest
forced you to employ a doctor, a law-
yer, or an engineer who got his degreei
by cribbing in examinations. Leaving1
the matter of personal honesty out ofc
the question for the moment, should
a }degree from the University of Mich-I
igan not stand at least for a certain
amount of honest work done while in1
school by the man who holds it?
But can this result be brought about

by adopting the honor system in ex-
aminations? We have referred to the
success of the system at Princeton.
The honor system has also been adopt-
ed at other institutions with equally
desirable results. Among the schools
which have adopted this system and
since evinced no desire to return to
the other, are the University of Vir-
ginia, Washington and Lee, Vander-
bilt, Wesleyan, Williams, Lehigh,
Washington and Jefferson, and the
University of Texas. This list of
names carries a great deal of weight
as an argument for the adoption of
the plan at Michigan.
It would hardly be a fair test to
adopt the scheme in one class only.
A student who comes from an exami-
nation where he feels that there is
no harm in cheating if he can do so
without being caught by the profes-
sor in charge, can hardly be expected
to change his attitude within a few
hours when he goes to a class where
his work is not done under the super-
vision of the faculty.
If the honor system is to be a suc-
cess the students must realize that
their conduct during examinations is
a matter of manliness, fair plays and
honesty to their school and fellow stu-
dents. They must realize that they are
not simply "slipping one over" on the
professor in charge of the examina-
tion when they succeed in cheating
without being detected, but that they
are being disloyal to their school by'
lowering her standards, unfair to their
fellow students by discouraging hon-
est work, and unmanly in their whole
attitude by adopting a dishonorable
and contemptible means of boosting
their credit. The only way that this
can be brought about is to have the
spirit general throughout the school.
No such spirit can 'prevail if a stu-
dent is to pledge his honor as a gen-
tileman not to cheat in one examina-
tion, and go to the next feeling that
there cheating is perfectly legitimate
if he is not caught at it
If the system is to be a success, it
should be eftirely free from faculty
interference. The students should be
completely on their honor or not at
all. It is foolish to think of adopting
an honor system if it is accompanied
by rules which provide that students
shall not sit near each other when
writing, that no student shall leave
the room during an examination, or
that the faculty shall try all cases of
cheating under the system. The stu-
dents must feel that the matter is en-
tirely within their -own hands, and
that success or faillure of the system
is a test of their own character and ef-
fectiveness, and not of the watchful-
ness of a member of the faculty.
And if the system is to be a success,
the demand for it should come, as it
has come, from the students. It is a
matter which the student council, the
Michigan Union, and the various cam-
pus societies can profitably take up,
and The Michigan Daily solicits com-
munications on both sides of the ques-
tion from any member of the student
body.
HATS

Have just received a shipment of the sweelest MICHIGAN STATI
ERY we have ever had.
55c to 75c per box
We give special attention to
Engraving and Plate Prinling
100 cards from your card plate for 90c All work guaranteed
WAHR'

14<
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,a l

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MicbiganStationc

0/

University Bookstore

1
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r
(i
1 a
.

1.

When anting anything in the lire of

11 !
1..If

M U S I C Call at

f
//
i
'
s

WHY NOT HAVE YOUR
MICHIGANENSIAN PICTURE
now so that you can have some of
~ Platinum Portraits
made from the negative-ycur friends at honie will appreciate tlhem
for X'mas.
Stadio 319 E. H11r-ozn St. Phozne 961-L

ORINNELL BROS. 120-122 Eait Lberly St.

I,1/~

!

,.I

ANN ARBOR GAS COMPANY1

SCHIROPOD Y
BUNIONS, CORNS CARED FOR AND
INGROWN NAILS CURED
are of the Feet also taught Everything absolutely anti-
septic. Office Hours 9-12 a.m. 1-5 p.m
MISS g. J. FOLEY 921 EAST HURON
2 blocks E. of High School . Phone 9891
The
Farmers and Mechanics Bank
10I1-103-105 South Main Street
Capital $100,000. Surplus and Profits $67,000

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Auu Arbor Time Table
Limited Cars fo rDetroit-7:12 a. m.. an0
hourly to 6:12 p. mn., also 8:12 p. mn.
Local Cars for Detroit-5;40 a. m., 6:40 a.
m., and every two hours to 6;40 p. m.. 7:40
p.m,"a:40ap.m.,9 :45 p. m., and 0:45 p. m
To Ypsil anti only.. 11:15 p. mn., 12:15 p. mn.
12:30 p. m., 1:00 a. m.
Limyted Cars for Jackson-7:46 a. m. and
every two hours to 7:46 p. mn.
Local Cars for Jackson-5:20 a m., aid
every two hours to 9:20 p. m., 11:15 p. m.

I ~ jV\
A not he r Year /6' t
May it be a happy
one-may he always have Fatimas.f
With each package of Fatimas you get a pennant cpon.
25 of which secure a handsome felt pennant-Ceege..1
Untera WesandFraternalOrders (12x32)-selecctoff 115
Individual

While we hesitate to enter editorial-
ly into a field where angels fear to
tread: namely, the province of The
Scintillator, yet we feel that even we
may contribute now and then some
helpful hints on etiquette. Social tra-
dition has it that hats are not to be
worn in the house, and the wise and
far-seeing management of the Michi-
gan Union has seen fit to decree that
the rules of society are to prevail in
the club parlors. We take genuine
(Continued on page 3)

Y) r!..'t i.L : .a4tikliY W rF"' 1551' _ d S ) ;. i:Y .___. OWN I III NOM L.,

Banquets

and Club Dinners

Our Optical System
s equipped to give the best service.
tes t eyes No "Drops" Used. We make your
glasses.
Shui-On Agency

Arnold & Co:
320 S. MAIN

are served in best of style at
M CK'S
TEA. ROOM
Also dinners,lunches and refreshments
Open 8 .m. to 5 p.m.--Saturdays till
p. in.
Orchestra Saturdays-- -Noon and Evening
SECOND FLOOR
Mack-&Co
MAIN STREET

Will prove as
good in every
way as the col-
lars that bear
the same name
$L.5 up
Cluett, Peabody & Company, Makers

zOSHIRT

Cranger's Academy of Dancing or lone246

-

New Class begins Tuesday, Nov. 19th. Register now. You can learn to
dance in one"term. Tuiion $3.00. For informntion call at Academy or
Phone 246.

French Crepe Fabric
A new shirting that appeals to good dressers

L

WACNER &

CO

SWEET
BETTER SERVICE

AS IT SOUNDS
BETTER CANDY

Haberdashers
State Street

ermnii Can n S n The
Liberty and Main Sts. State Savingsl
AMost Convenient Place for Your Wm J. Booth, President Wm. Arnold, Vic
Banking C. John Walz, Jr., Cashier

THE SUGAR BOWL
Ann Arbor's Best Confectionery. Ice cream soda de luxe. Candy of all
descriptions.

the Jforest lawn lea.

iOc

TO STUDENTS, PARTIES, ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION

Forest.

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