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November 24, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-24

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- $2.50

I

The

Michigan

Daily

MAILED TO
IADDRESS

$3.00

E

XXIII, No. 47.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1912.

PRICE FIVE

~:

ENTS ARE
rALENT IN

OF 1916

arison With Statistics of Last
Year's Freshman Class
Shows Increase in
Afflictions.
[AY ISSUES DATA AFTER
COMPLETING EXAMINATTIONS
ut Freshmen are Older as a Class
But Fall Below in, Height.
and We~gbt.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Sunday
probably fair, colder; brisk and high
southwesterly winds.
University Observatory-Saturday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 36.2; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
46; 'minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 30.4: average wind velocity
14 miles per hour.
Soph Engineers to Smoke at Union.
Sophomore engineers will gather at
the Union tomorrow evening for a
class smoker. Light refreshments and
"smokes" will be distributed by the
committee.
LARGE AUDIENCE
ENJOYS PROGRAM

"MICHIGAN AND YOST"--- THE
COMBINATION INSEPAR

*

L

* * * * *

SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL R
SULTS.
West.
Chicago 7, Minnesota 0.
Northwestern 6, Illinois 0.
Kansas 9, Missouri 3.
Wisconsin 14, Iowa 0.
Purdue 34, Indiana 7.
0. S. U. 39, Ohio Wes. 6.
Ames 10, Drake 3.
Fast.
Harvard 20, Yale 0.
Army 23, Syracuse 7.
Lehigh 10, Lafayette 0.
,Navy 39, N. Y. U. 0.
Swarthmore 0, Dickinson 0.
Carlisle 30, Y. M. C. A. 24.

* *
EK- *
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

NEW IDEAS ARE

TO BE USED
1913 YEAR-B

Contracts Were Awarded Not MI
on a Basis of Price but Also o
Quality of Work Previously
Done by Firms
FtATERNITY AND SORORITY
SECTIONS WILL BE CHIANI
Ai' Copy Must be in Not Later I
December 20; Book to be 50 Pag
Larger Than Last Year.

-

'.May, director of Waterman gym,
a
finished his examinations of the
freshman class. This year a total
14 youngsters were examined,
h exceeded last fall's number by
e than 100.
e first year men are a trifle older
in previous years, averaging 19.1
s against 18.9 years in the 1915
. The freshmen of last year out-
hed the present class, however,
ye tenths of a pound to the man.
1915 men also excelled their
ger rivals in height and lung ca-
.y by one half an inch and three-
s cubic inches In the two respect-
ests.
flictions are more in evidence this
than last. A comparison follows:

Japanese Night Presented by
Cosmopolitan Club Meets With
Enthusiastic Reception.

the

191
blindness ..........3'
roubles necessitating

1916
.7

ses ................204
troubles ...........291
ed tonsils .......... 86
.ds ................ 78
ure of spine ..... 78

227
331
110
89
87
25

d hearts.... ... .
trouble in the

14

art ................. 5 8
gular hearts ......... 93
troubles ............26 64
re .......... ....... 16 42
ia .................. 10 12"
May has summoned 89 out of the
to report for a special examina--
for tuberculosis. This number
omposed of those men whose f4m-
istory shows signs of the disease,
those who show the slightest
)toms in their breathing.
ELESS FROM WASHINGTON
IS SENT BY lDEAN COOLEY.

JAPANESE FROLIC EXEMPLIFIED.
In spite of the discouraging weather;
more than 600 persons crowded New-
berry hall last night to witness the
first of the series of "National Nights"
given by the Corda Fratres-Cosmopoli-
tan association. The hall was quaint-
ly decorated with the American and
Japanese national flags, numerous
palms and Japanese lanterns, present-
ing a purely oriental atmosphere.
W. W. Welsh, president of the club,
had charge of the program. In his in-
troductory remarks, President Welsh
outlined the purpose of the club and
what it stands for. "Most people think
that the club consists of the foreign
students only," said the president,
"but it is organized both for American
and foreign students to get together
and solve the misconceptions of differ-
ent peoples, to awaken in the Ameri-
cans a lively interest in the outside
world, and to advocate the ideals of
peace and humanity."
The first number on the program
was a lecture on the scenic beauty of
Continued on page 6.)
G. A. PLIMPTON SPEAKS ON
. DEVELOPMENT OF TEXT BOOKS
Mr. George A. Plimpton will speak
tomorrow afternoon at 4:30 in the
'economics lecture room on the devel-
opment of text-books. He has already
spoken on this subject at both Harvard
and Yale, and after leaving Michigan
he will give the same lecture at a
number of universities on his way
to Leland-Stanford. Every person at-
tending this lecture will be given a
souvenir.
"PRE-TURKEY DAY" DANCE IS
TO BE FEATURED BY UNION,
As an advahce celebration of Tur-
key day, a big special dance will be
held at the Michigan Union next Wed-
nesday evening. Dancing will contin-
ue from 9:00 to 2:00 o'clock, and tick-
ets will sell for 75 cents.
As usual, tickets will be issued for
only 100 couples. The admission cards
for the extra dance will go on sale at,
the Union at 5:00 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon.
Chinese Students Hear W. A. Stearly.
The Rev. Wilson A. Stearly of Mont
Clare, New Jersey, will speak before
the Chinese students' club of the uni-
versity at McMillan hall today at 3:00
o'clock. He will discuss the third of,
the series of questions relating to
Christianity and its application, pre-
pared by a committee consisting of.
Professors J. Raleigh Nelson and T. E.
Rankin, L. K. Kao, '12, W. P. Chen,
'14; and I. H. Si, '19.

Fielding H. Yost

A " _ '

Out of every football season arises cause for joy, cause for sorrow, cause
for celebration and cause for reflection. In every game lost there arises a
host of critics, a horde of fault finders. And in every game won these self
same hordes and hosts turn hero worshippers. And it is only in the long and
dreary after months that merit finds its place and that talent and worth are
awarded their due. And now that the season is over and" the last enthusiast
has worn out his voice, just as in year s past arises the predominating figure
of Fielding H. Yost, in old style foot-ball, in new style football, in every fea
ture of the game, the master of the master of them all.

MANY-MERCHANTS,
WILL CO-OPERATE
Forty-Nine Stores to Reduce Prices
to Members of Michigan
"Co-Op" Association.
MEMBERSHIP FEE IS NOMINAL.
Forty-nine stores have contracted
with the University of Michigan Co-
operative association, recently estab-
lished, to give its members a five or
ten per cent discount on all purchases
over one dollar.
One merchant in each line of busi-
ness in all three trade centers of Ann
Arbor, and many merchants in De-
troit have agreed to give these reduc-
tions to members of the association.
To become a member of the asso-
ciation, a student must pay a fee of
one dollar. He will then receive the
directory containing the names of the
merchants who give reductions, and
also a card entitling him to purchase
at a discount at these stores, which
will be good until Nov. 15, 1913. This
directory will be out the first of the
week.
This co-operative plan is similar to
the one which has been in vogue at
several eastern universities for many
years.
Further information regarding the
plan may be secured from S. I. Tice,
'13, manager, 306 N. State street.
AND HE IS SUCH AN OLD MAN
TO BE TRAVELING ALL ALONE
Ankh Peta Hotep, 3,000 years old and
a native of Thebes, has mysteriously
disappeared. When last heard of he
was in Detroit en route for Ann Arbor,
but he has either been beguiled by the
frivolities of modern life or else some
old maid, reviving a long dead hope
has enmeshed him in the conjugal
bonds. In spite of these possibilities,
however, the university authorities
are not worried over his non-appear-
ance.
Mr. Hotep is the mummy of one of
Thebe's merchant princes. He has
been donated to the university by
Charles Wright, Sr., of Detroit.
SENIOR CLASS WOMEN HOLD
FIRST LUNCHEON AT UNION.

Station in High State
ency; Federal Inspec-
toy Expected.

It is his unequalled genius that lies
behind the unexpected and startling
plays that win games. It is his force,
his intensity that drives the Michigan
squad through long and weary signal
drills, through hard scrimmage and
through fierce battles. Win or loge,
Michigan is his team, no man feels a
lost game so keenly, no man gets so
much satisfaction out of victory.
Years ago New York critics picked
him as the greatest coach in the coun-
try. He has not lost his power, his
reputation or his creative genius. He
knows the new game as he knew the
old. He knows the value of a play.
He -knew the value of that old style
play that beat Pennsylvania in 1911.
He knew the value of those two for-
ward passes that defeated Cornell this
year. He knew the value of that fake
forward pass that made so much
ground for Michigan this year.

Michigan has had its lean years, sad-
dened with a series of defeats. It has
had its harvest years filled with great
victories. But through it all Yost has
been the same, devoting his energy, all
to. the one end.. Go throughout the
country and ask football enthusiasts.
Go to players, to coaches, to critics.
Their answers are the same "You have
Yost. You should win." Ask the old.
grads what they would think of Mich-
igan without Yost. Ask the youngest
freshman or the factulty man. The
two, Michigan and Yost, are insepara-
bly linked.
And so after this year, one of dis-
appointments and yet sweet in its final
victory, his sterling worth slowly
looms up. And in the plans for next
year it is his name that is first men-
tioned. The greatest coach in Amer-
ica today, Fielding H. Yost.

Contracts for the 1913 Michigane
sian, the largest of the kind ever gi
en out by the university, have be
awarded by the board in control
student publications to the Cargill C
of Grand Rapids and the Bureau
Engraving of Minneapolis, Minnesot
Both companies have done work
previous year books. The former fir
did the printing and binding of t
1911 Michiganensian and the latt
has done the engraving for the pa
two years.
Estimates from fully 30 compani
were considered and the manageme:
states that the contracts were final
awarded not merely on a basis
price, but also in consideration of t
quality of work previously done by t
firm making the bids. The Michiga:
ensian management, C. G. Shoeffel a
Stanley Newhall will co-operate 11
the above mentioned firms, and it
expected that they will turn out or
of the most beautiful volumes whi
has yet appeared.
According to the .imanagement, ti
1913 annual will embody sever
changes as the general standard t
the artistic work will be raised to
higher level and fully 50 more pag
will be added. A distinctly novel ph<
tograveure will be printed on the ded
cation page. The Fraternity and S5
rority section will be changed con
pletely. The terms of the contra4
call for delivery on the first day <
May.
All the fraternity and sorority 'mat
rial is now in the hands of the ed
tors and it will be sent to the put
lishers within the next two weeks.
The Various campus organizatior
must make their contracts for spac
by December 7, and copy for thi
space must be turned in not later tha
December 20.
The management urges seniors an
others who have material to hand i
to do so at once. If senior pictures ax
not in by January 15 the regula
price of one dollar will be increase
to $1.25.
THREE "EDS" ARE ON PROGRAM
AT UNION-NOT "DAILY" ME
This afternoon's programat the U
ion will be featured .by stunts by thre
"Eds"-three, count 'em. "Ed" How
'13E, and "Ed" Ham, '15, will furnis
the musical portion of the entertai
ment, while "Ed" Kemp, '14L, wi
give a short talk.
As usual the program i will con
mence at 3:00 o'clock, and refrest
ments will be passed.
Forestry Department Gets New S11d
Teaching facilities in the Forest
department were greatly improve
this year by the addition of a larg
number of lantern slides for use i
lecture work. Prof. P. S. Lovejoy s
cured 300 views during his work i
various western forest tracts unde
the employ of the United States go
ernment, and Prof. Filibert Roth o
tained a number of fine negative
while studying European forests la
summer.

of

Dean Cooley of the engineering de-
rtment, who has been in Washing-
n, D. C., during the past week, sent
wireless test message to the univer-
y Friday from the U. S. Navay sta-
n at Washington. Owing to the ef-
its of the local operator the univer-
y station is in a high state of effi-
meny, the sending capacity havings
yen increased from 5 to 15 kilowats,
d it is expected that the federal in-.
ector, who is soon due to make his
st official visit to the station, will
favorably impressed.
HIFFINS PAY DUE HOMAGE
TO GODDESS TERPSICHORE.

Verein Meeting Postponed to Tuesday.
The men's section of the Deutscher
Verein will meet Tuesday evening at
8:00 o'clock instead of Monday, on ac-
count of the Flonzaley quartet concert.
Ten new members will be elected at
this meeting. The program will con-
sist of music and reading by Lawrence
Clayton, '15.

DIr. Warthin Returns From Trip.
Dr. A. S. Warthin of the medical de-
partment who has spent much of the
past week lecturing in Michigan and
Ohio returned yesterday from a visit
to Toledo where he spoke to the Ohio
State Federation of Women's clubs on
a subject pertaining to tuberculosis.

Yesterday's Affair Stands Unique
History of Institution; Dane-
ing is a Feature.

in

fin Gods and Goddesses answer-
call of Terpsichore last evening
they assembled at the Packard
my to while away a few hours
dance. With all the pomp and
ony that befits a gathering of
nhabitants of Mount Olympus,
passed an evening of merriment
w Nas aided greatly by the music
Wright Saxophone trio.
f. and Mrs. James A. Bird and
nd Mrs. F. W. Waldron chaper-

the

P~resbyterian Church
10:30--Sermon, "Back to Christ
12:1o--University Bible Classes
6.30---Young Peophs Service, "The Spirit cf Thanksgivii g

For the first time in the history of
the Michigan Union, a class dinner at-
tended entirely by university women
was held at that institution yesterday.
The occasion was the first of a series
of luncheons for senior class women.
One hundred and fifteen were present.
Mrs. H. B. Hutchins and Mrs. J. R.
Effinger gave short talks at the dinner.
Following a brief business meeting,
the floor was cleared and the remain-
der of the afternoon devoted to danc-
ing. t3.! .

Leader, J. 1. Lippincott, '14

UnLI i

REV.

'WILSON

R.

STEARLEY

Epscopal

Series

Subject: The Difficulties and Advantages
of Faith

Ch~src

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