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November 23, 1912 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-23

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ie

Michigan

Daily

I

f=AiLED TO
A DDRESS $

p.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1912,

PRICE

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THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday,
fair and warm, continued cloudy.
MRS. DOROTHEA POTTER TO
ADDRESS WOMEN TODAY.
Mrs. Dorothea Potter, national secre-
tary for colleges, Presbyterian Board,
of New York, will address college
women on the subject "A Woman's
World" this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock
at Westminster hall, 602 East Huron
street. This will be the first regular
meeting of the Westminster guild for
the current year.
Mrs. Potter will be tendered a re-
ception this afternoon from 4:00 to'
6:00 o'clock at the same place,to which
,all college women are invited.
COSMOPOLITANS FEATURE
FLOWERY KINGDOM TONIGHT'
The Japanese night to be featured by
the Corda Fratres-Cosmopolitan club
in Newberry hall this evening will be
the first big event staged by the club
this year, and is to be distinctly char-
acteristic of the flowery kingdom. .All
the actors are native Japanese, and
are skilled in the many dances and
unique masques to be presented.
The program commences at 7:30,
and is open to the public. No admit-
tance will be charged.
TECHNICAL MISTAKE CAUSES
HETLER CASE DISMISSMENT.

ither. to give
f any kind in
ny of the quiz
nd 2a; that is,
with cheating
ch this honor
shall be decid-
xho accept it."
tive form of a
30 members of
ses in English
day afternoon
sing a propow
course. The
mitted to the
veek for adop-
ufficient num-
ystem to ren-

Remains of Freshman Athlete
Sent to His Hone in
New York.

Are

LINDNER'S BODY
IS SENT HOME'

revives the

histc

The case against A. C. Hetler, '15E,
the studentaarrested last Saturday
night for egging the jail, was dismiss-
ed, another charge being immediately
preferred against him. This was ne-
cessitated by a technical mistake, for
he was arrested for breaking a city or-
dinance, when the officer meant to ar-
rest him under a state law. His case
will come up before Judge Ritchie next
Thursday.
Two other men, presumably stu-
dents, who gave fictitious names to the
authorities, are also being held for
trial.

sible that
in other
adoption

o say in favor
id Prof. Turn-
uch a system
>f high ideals.
en course full
r real, honor-
ance will it bo
obtain credit
e the standard
avor is raised.
any students,
sity, who may
the period of
.will be influ-
cording to the
for good or
suld mould the
dents, perhaps

i ,,
i

I the students dis-
red that the matterI
stem that mjght be
tirely in their own
ble, that in case of
n honor system, a
ewill be appointed
of violation of the
rred, to take what
fit. At the same
volve upon anyone
to disclose the
seen cheating, that
being left entirely
d choice of the stu-
stem offers advan-
ome that are in op-
the medical depart-
eeling that a man
ige puts himself in
e-teller often works
to the system.

NOTABLE PROGRAM
TO BE PRESENTED
The program announced by the Flon-
zaley quartet for their concert on Mon-
day evening gives promise of a de-
lightful exhibition of the fine art of
ensemble. The Flonzaleys are favor-
ites in Ann Arbor, having appeared
here many times in past years, and
Monday evening is being eagerly
awaited by concert-goers. Owing
to the large number of single tickets
sold for the Schumann-Heink recital,
there are still a few season tickets. on
sale at the school of music.
The program will be as follows:
Quartet in D major (Koch 499).Mozart
Allegretto
Menuetto
Adagio
Allegro
Quartet in D major, Op. 11,......
...........Tchaikovsky
Moderato e semplice,
Andante cantabile
Scherzo
Finale
Quartet in G major, Op. 76, No. 1,..
... Haydn
Allegro con spirito
Adagio sostenuto
Presto
'Allegro ma non troppo
MUCH NEW MATERIAL APPEARS
FOR "KOEPENICKERSTER 120."
About 40 followers of the histrionic
art turned out yesterday afternoon for
the preliminary tryout for "Koepen-
ickerster 120," the Deutscher Verein
.play to be presented in the first part
of next semester. The majority of
those who appeared were new. The
first of the final tryouts will be held
next Friday from 4:00 to 6:00 p. m. in
room 203, University hall, and the sec-
ond on the following Monday at the
same time and place. Those who have
not yet signed up for the tryouts are

SYMPATHY FROM DEAN EFFINGER
The body of Alfred Lindner, '16,
whose death occurred early yesterday
morning at the university hospital,
was sent to his home at Buffalo, N. Y.,
yesterday afternoon. His father, who
has been with him since his removal
to the hospital, and his roommate,
Richard Girven, accompanied the body.
Dean J. R. Effinger, who visited
Lindner's father yesterday, said, "It
was a sad case, but I have been im-
pressed by the spirit shown by the
students of all classes who volunteer-
ed to assist in the nursing. Everybody
seemed willing and anxious to help."
The fresman literary class, of which
Lindner was a member, decided yes-
terday to send flowers as a mark of
their sympathy.
The death, coming directly after a
day of rapid improvement, was the
climax of a remarkable battle for
Slife which has been raging for nearly
three weeks.
During the latter part of his illness,
Lindner was perfectly conscious of all
that was taking place around him,
being well aware of his condition, and
that there was no hope for him to re-
cover.
His father, the physician and nurse,
were the only ones present when he
died. His two brothers, who had been
with him previously, were unable to
be there.
ORATORS URGED TO BE READY.
Preliminaries for Peace Contest Will
Be Held Dec. 4.
Students who anticipate entering the
Peace Oratorical contest are reminded
that the orations are due Dec. 4, and
that the preliminaries will come with-
in a week of that time.
The final contest will be held Dec.
19, the winner of which will represent
Michigan in the state contest to be
held next spring at the Michigan Nor-
mal College. Michigan's representa-
tive last year, Percival Blanchard, '14,
won the national contest.
It is expected that the following tes-
timonials will be given: in the state'
contest, $75.00 and $50.00 for first and
second honors, respectively; and in
the national contest $100.00 and $50.00
for the two highest places.
Dean. Guthe Inspects State Colleges.
Dean Guthe, of the graduate depart-
ment, left yesterday for a week's
inspection of graduate departments in
several state universities. Dean Guthe
is espcially interested in the support
given the department in the different
universities which have a heavier
graduate enrollment than Michigan.
He will visit the Universities of Chica-
go, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa.
75 Couples Attend Wright Party.
Seventy-five couples attended the
first party at the Union last night giv-
en by the Wright saxophone trio. There
will be two more such parties given at
the Union the dates of which will be
announced later. Frank Murphy and
William Shafroth are in charge of the
arrangements.
Grad Has Story in Current Outing.
Kirk B. Alexander, '96, has a story
"At the Feet of Nan-Na-Bon-Jou" in
the current Outing. The tale deals
with a fishing trip up the Dog river,
which flows into Lake'Superior.
Prof. Gram Goes to Toledo.
Prof. Lewis M. Gram of the struc-
tural engineering department, left on
a short business trip to Toledo yester-
day. He will return to Ann Arbor

Monday.
New Astronomy Book to be Out Soon.
The new book being published by the
astronomical department, and which
will contain accounts of the work
done by that department, will proba-
bly be out in a few weeks. A long de-
lay has been occasioned by the print-
ers, making the time of appearancel
much later than was expected at first.j

BROWN IS CHOSEN
CAPTAINOFCC.CC.
Represented Michigan in Half Mile a
Eastern Intercollegiate
Last Year.
FOUR MILE RACE CLOSES SEASON.
At a meeting of the "C" men of the
cross country team last night Harry
E. Brown, '14E, was elected captain
for next year to succeed Raymond C.
Haimbaugh, '13. Brown is a well-
known member of the Varsity track
squad, and one of the rnen who repre-
sented Michigan in the half mile run
at the intercollegiates last year. The
other officers elected were R. C.-Haim-
baugh, president, H. C. Carver, treas-
urer, and Kenneth Young, secretary.
The directors elected were R. A. Allen,
A. S. Chapero and F. R. Manahan.
The cross-dountry season closed last
Thursday with a four and one-half
mile race in which R. C. Haimbaugh
finished first, G. V. Lynch second, H.
C. Carver third and Chapero fourth,
time 25:47. The first two men to fin-
ish were presented with silver loving
cups, and the first four received their
"C. C. C.'s."
TOM MAJOR FLEES FROM CITY.
Police Fail to Apprehend Eccentric
Novelist for Distributing Circulars
After a baffling search instituted by
the police department since Monday
to apprehend Toh Major for distrib-
uting circulars said to be of a suggest-
ive nature on the campus and in that
vicinity, the police believe that he has
sought refuge in flight from the city.
They placed a close espionage on
Tom's favorite haunts in this city, but
the eccentric novelist, and man of
many cognomens proved too wily to be
entrapped, and eluded the vigilanceof
the officers.
It is believed that Major was tipped
off to the police's activity in his behalf
by well-meaning friends, and after put-
ting the ability of the police depart-
ment to a fair test to locate him, he
left before Ann Arbor became too
warm for his further sojourn.
JUNIOR LITS FEATURE OLD
NEW ENGLAND AT DANCE.
A cigar store Indian labelled as one
of the original settlers of New Eng-
land, a Plymouth Rock chicken, and
the Mayflower-not the ship however-
were features of the junior lit New
England dance held last evening in
Barbour gymnasium. Seventy-five
couples were present and Prof and
Mrs. J. A. C. Hildner, acted as chap-
erones.
WORK ON MICHIGANENSIAN
IS PROGRESSING RAPIDLY.
This year's Michiganensian is pro-
gressing remarkably 'well according
to the year book editors. The work
is much farther advanced than at this
time last winter, in regard to both the
editorial and the business sides of it,
and the outlook is exceedingly bright
for putting out an unusually fine book.
A number of artists are hard at work
on the various heads which have been
assigned, and almost all the advertis-
ing contracts are in.
Copy in the fraternity section of the
book must be in by 6:00 o'clock to-
night, so all organizations of that
charactei which have not seen to this
should do so at once. The only crit-
icism that editor Newhall has to make
of the way things are going is that
the seniors are slower than usual in

getting their pictures taken for the
book. The pictures should be taken
or at least dates should be made with
the photographer at once.
FIRST NUMBER OF TECHNIC
TO APPEAR DECEMBER 1.
The first number of the Michigan
Technic for the year will be distrib-
uted on December 1. The book will
contain a survey of the work of Prof.
H. E. Riggs, the new head of the civil
engineering department, written by
Prof. C. T. Johnson. There will also
be an article on "Up-to-Date Photogra-
phy" by Ward Davidson, '13E. The
general make-up of the' magazine this
year will be much the same as last.

Prof. Roth Makes Clear His Stand
Controversy With Weather
Bureau Chief.

CATHOLIC STUDENTS SMOKER
SETS NEW ATTENDANCE RECORD
The smoker given by the Catholic
Student's club in St. Thomas hall last
night brought out more than 300 stu-
dents, and inaugurates a new record in
attendance
The next event planned by the club
is a dance to be held on Thanksgiving,
and Fischer's orchestra will provide
musical repertoire. Tickets for the
dance may be secured from C. Harold
Hippler, '12-'14L, president of the club,
or from George Sewell, '14E.
FORESTRY FACULTY RETURN
FROM M IICHIIGAN CONVENTION

in

I

Professors Filibert Roth, 6. L. Spon-
sler, P. S. Lovejoy, and Mr. L. J. Young
of the forestry faculty and H. Pottin-
ger, president of the forestry club re-
turned to Ann Arbor yesterday from
the annual convention of the Michigan
State Forestry association which was
held Wednesday and Thursday in Sag-
inaw. All of the men took an active
part in the business and discussions of
the convention. Prof. Lovejoy was
elected secretary of the association
and Michigan will be further repre-
sented in the administration by the
choice of Regent Junius K. Beal as
one of the directors.
Prof. Roth tooksoccasion to make
clear his stand in the little controver-
sy he has had with Chief Moore of the
United States weather bureau, There
seems to be a difference of opinion'
as to whether or not forest growth
tends to prevent ,floods and washouts.
The great majority of scientists are of
the opinion that such growth does in
a great measure help to prevent floods
while it seems that a few scientists and
a number of politicians hold that it
does not. Chief Moore has taken this
latter view and has had some litera-
ture published and sent out to the va-
rious . weather stations. Prof. Roth
simply stated his opinion and he let it
be thoroughly known that it did not
agree with Chief Moore's.
OPROCLAIMS ANNUAL
THANKSGIVING DAY
The formal proclamation announc-
ing the annual day of thanksgiving has
been issued by Governor Chase S. Os-
born and is ad follows:'
"Another year has been added to the
golden scroll of Michigan. Our people
have been recipients of God's bounty,
His nercy and His love. The state has
been spared famine and pestilence.
There has been a wholesome awaken-.
ing of public conscience. Civic ideals
were never clearer and higher. Our
people have an increased reverence
for the laws of God and man. Every
fibre of heart and head thrills with
gratefulness to the Divine Father.
"Therefore, I, Chase S. Osbori, gov-
ernor of Michigan, for the people of
this state, having in mind the mani-
fold blessings of God, do proclaim
Thursday the twenty-eighth day of
November as a day of feasting 'and
prayer and thanksgiving to ,God for
His goodness, His protection and His'
direction,"
Verein Now Has Bulletin Board.
Deutscher Verein now has a bulletin
board for the convenience of its mem-
bers. All meetings, announcements,
and other news of interest to the so-
ciety will be posted here, and the
members are requested to watch it
closely. The board is situated in the
south end of the rear corridor in Uni-
versity hall just across from room
102.
COACH DOUGLAS WILL REMAIN
HERE DURING WINTER MONTHS
The closing of the interclass foot-
ball series does not necessarily mean
the end of Coach Douglas' work for the
year. As long as the soccer game is
played he will be in full charge, and it
is not likely that the season will close
before the latter part of December or
at least until snow prevents the con-
tinuance of the sport, During the
winter months Douglas will take the
class - basketball management under'
his wing and organize the various de-
n"rtment hockey teams.

At Citizens Mass Meeting La
Principal Springer of High
Declares This Harms L<
Prosperity.
CITY MUST BE 1TIRACTIV
TO BRING PUPIL
Chamber of Commerce to be t o e
to Improve Civic and C<
mercial Conditions.
"While I talk here tonight,
ed D. W. Springer, principa
Ann Arbor high school, at I
meeting of citizens held at 1
house last night, "half a dozen
are filled with students, and th
one of the main reasons why
not 1,000 more students in th
sity than are now enrolled.
as our saloons cater almost ex
to student trade, and so long
dents continue to be ruined
that medium, just so long wi
hesitate to send their childrer
is otherwise granted to be t
university in the country. Th
our other industries combine
we would help Ann Arbor,
way in which we can do it is t
more students here and resid
Wish their sons and daughter
oome students."
"The university is a gold
said E. B. Manwaring, "and 1
for us to do is to develop it.
are now brought here annuall
dents, and it might just as wel
000,000. The other gentleme
the university is our large
Then let us get the most out o
we can, and the way to do t
make the city attractive to the
of these students anl induce
come here."
This was the principal note
ress sounded at the meeting
with a view to reorganike the
ber of Commerce and work to
civic and commercial condi
Ann Arbor. As a resultof the
it was voted to organize a Ch
Commerce according to the p
lined by the self-styled "con
evangelist" William Macomb.
Prof. R. E. Bunker of the law
ment, spoke against the plan
ing that, while undoubtedly
cal and only way to boost a
through organization, he did
lieve the plans proposed were
enough, and he could not se
would take so much money.

UNI YEA

SAYSSALOON
KEP10FF

WOMEN FAVOR L

Satistics Show Only 200 Not L
Approved Houses.
Some interesting facts ab!
housing of university women
gathered from the following st
There are 800 women in the un:
55 being in the graduate schi
this number 95 are in league
200 in sororities, about 200 in a
houses, and about 100 live j:
This leaves only about 200 wor
of the 800, who are housed oth
in places which are under th
supervision of authority. '
Freshmen women are requir
in league or approved houses,
es, approved personally 1
the dean of women. Upper clai
en are permitted more choice,
general sentiment is in favor
living in houses which have th
of approval by those in author
time, with the dormitory syst
additionalleague and approve
es, it is hoped that all worm
come to the university may be:r
ficiently and properly cared for
Invent Liquid )Measuring .D
The latest achievement of
gineering shops in the way .o
tion is the liquid measuring
which has been prepared for
perimental engineering dept
The device indicates the am
liquid measured by the m
turns it takes a graduated mht

GRE SSING.

ew fire protection
d to such an extent
already being dug
n front of the gen-
ng to the fact that
all around the
he library, it is ad-
ny individuals who
ire to remove red
ich signals of dan-
suggest that great

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