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November 22, 1912 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-22

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DOOR - $2.50

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.1AILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

9 i - - i I'll 11,11 mwmmmmm

I

No. 45.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1912.

PRICE FIVE C

- _. _

Y-SIX

.THE WEATHER MAN

IRUDS GET

R'SWEATERS
vlh Smith's Selections Were Offi.
eialy ATted On Yesterday
by tlhv Committee Which
Makes Awards.
ITHFUL SERVICE AGAINST
VARSITY DETERMINES PLACES
Reserve Insignia Are Awarded to
Those Who Fought Hardest
Against Big Squad.
wenty-six reserve football players
1 receive their R's."
a reward for their faithful services
season in helping to condition the
sity, a list of twenty-six men has
a awarded the reserve insignia,
sisting of the "R." The list of men'
>, in the opinion of Coach "Bill"
th of the scrub eleven, were de-
ring of the awards, was officially
d upon yesterday by the commit-
which makes the awards

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Friday
fair and colder.
University Observatory-Thursday
7:00 p. m., temperature 42.8; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
57.8; minimum temeprature, 24 hours
preceding, 42.6; average wind velocity,
9 miles per hour.

.,
,!

POPULAR QUARTET
WILL PLAY HERE
The Four Flonzaleys Will Gh e Second
Concrt o Choal i on
S Series on Monday.
MANY GOOD SEATS 'NSOLI).

SOPH LITS BEGIN SOCIAL
PROGRAM WITH A SMOKER
Eighty members of the soph lit class+
were present at its initial smoker of
the year. Prof. David Friday of the
economics department spoke on both
the humorous an'd the serious side of
university life. H. L. Kennedy spoke
on the basketball prospects of the com-
ing season. "Chet" Lang, representing
the social committee, announced that
the first class dance will be given at
the Union on Dec. 4.

WILL PRESENT A
'NATIONAL NIGHT'

The Flonzaley Quartet will give the
second concert of the Choral Union
series on Monday evening, November
25, in University Haill. It is five years
since this famous quartet made its
first appearance in Ann Arbor, at the
time of its first journey of conquest to
America. It now stands as one of the
greatest chamber-music organizations
in the world, and by consistent playing
each year in Europe and America, is
constantly winning more laurels. The
personnel of the quartet remains the
same this year as before.
Temperamentally they are well fit-
ted for their work, and the fact that
they do not have to consider the finan-
cial side in working out their pro-
'grams and policies means much to
them in their art. This organization
is unique in this respect, since all the
other great quartets are made up of'
musicians who devote a large part of
their time to teaching, solo work and
various other activities.
Owing to the fact that a goodly num-
ber of general admission tickets ad-
mitting to the one concert only were
sold at the date of the Schumann-
Heink concert, there is now a limited
number of tickets available for the
Flonzaley concert and the remaining
concerts on the series, which will be
disposed of in the order of application.
When this number is exhausted, it will
be impossible to secure more tickets
of any kind, since the legal restric-
tions forbid the selling of more tick-
ets of any kind than the seating capac-
ity.

OR. HALL DEFENDS 1
RHODES SCHOLARS
Snys (ilicisnm by (L R0 Parin, Ix '
Secretary of the Rhodes Scmol-
«rship Fund is Vnfoumdedi,
CRITICISES OX FOR I) C0O3M TT E$S1
Severe criticism made by Dr. George
11. Park in, ex-secretary of the Rhodes
scholarship fund, upon . some of the
students which America sends to the
English college does not in any way
reflect on the American students or
upon our methods of education," said
Prof. A. (. Hall yesterday. For sever-
al years while located at Miami uni-
versity, Prof. Hall was a member of
the Ohio state committee on Rhode
scholarships.
Dr. Parkin, in speaking before the
National Association of American Uni..-
versities, which is now in session at
Washington, D. C., stated that he did
not see how some of our graduates
got into Oxford and intimated that cer-
tain students were chosen because of
their personal or financial standing.
"if Dr. Parkin has been corrtctly
noled,' said Prof. tall, "his criticism
hits only the Oxford committees which
have to do with the examination ques-
tions. The papers are sent to the
United States in sealed envelopes and
are not opened until the hour of ex-
amination. After being filled out, they
are returned by re;;istered mail to
England to be graded.
"All persons who pass the examina-~
tions are equally eligible for appoint-
ment. The state committees after the
grades have been received chose one
candidate who best fills other require-
ments of the rules, but the committees
have nothing to do with the tests inl
Lat, Cieck and other subjects. If
an-one is responsible for poor stu-
dents being admitted to the college, it
is those persons at Oxford who make
cut the questions and grade the pa-
Ipers." -

CA 111I'ILI CS jIIOL,) '113 MO(E
Sei erami Wehi-Kmiown Miin Will Appeni
oil thepr iog'ram,
The smoker to be given by the Cath-
olic Student's club in St. Thomas hall
this cnuing will be one of the biggest
events attempted by the club this year,
and is a departure in the way of social
unctions featured by the club. The
affair was planned for thle purpose of
bringing out all the Catholic students
in te university, making them ac-
quaMined with one another and with
the purpose of the club.
C. Harold Rippler, '12-'14L, president
of The club will preside at the smoker,
and those who will take active part in
the program are, lBishop Kelley, Father
O'Connor, Trainer Steve Farrell, Prof'
W. A. McLaughln, Prof. A. F. Hurl-
burt, Proseeutor George Burke, '07L,
James Cleary, '12L, "Sid" Doyle, '12L,
and city attorney J. W. Dwyer, '92n.
Cider arnd doughnuts wviii be served
for refreshmonts and the event is open
to all C<tholic students attendin; the
university whether members of the
club cr not.
3:2'0 1THIS ORIN
Slight Brmse FIon ( ross Country
tuning Causes Poisoning
Which Proves Fatal.
WAS TAKEN T H pOSPTAL NOV. 4.
Alfred F. Linduer, '16, the athlete of
Buffalo N. Y., died at 3:20 this morn-
ing. He has grown gradually worse
since Nov. 4, when he was first taken
to the University hospital. Last night
he ceased to be delirious but the blood
poisoniu, which started from a slight
bruise incurred in cross country run-
ning, had spread through his entire
syste. Although there were slight
improvements at times, his condition
has admitted no chance of recovery
since he first became ill.,
Lindner graduated last year from
the Lafayette high school in Buffalo.
During his high school career he was
prominent as an athlete and was cap-
tain of the cross country team of the
school. By winning a place on the
fresh relay team, he was the first
freshman to obtain his numerals in
the history of the university and was
promise of good Varsity material.

The following men will receive the
C. E. Wyman, Reuben Peterson, Cy-
il Quinn, McHale, Tessin, Bentley,
Achtner, Wright, Scott, Sheppherd,
1ferritt, Paisley, Morse, J. C. Peterson,
7ells, Millard, Wilson, McDonald, Eis-
mhower, Brown, Thienes, Mathieson,
Young, Jay, W. H. Allmendinger, and
ompkins.
3RIFFIN SOCIETY INITIATES.
Pwelve Men Learn Mysteries of Inter-
Departmental Organization.
With the setting of the sun yester-
ay afternoon Griffins, the inter-de-
'artmental society,. opened its doors
nd exposed the many sacred secrets
f the order to the wondering ears of
welve mortals. With the tolling of
he hour of six, the band of visiting
lities filed up the campus in solemn
rocession and gathered under their
rotecting wings the mortals who hov-
red about the flag pole, and then led
tem to the immortal,heights of Mount
lympus.
After a long journey beset with un-
eard of difficulties for the neophytes,
he band met at the Union and there
artook of the sacred ambrosia of the
ods. Griffin traditions and customs
ere imparted by the older Gods. Prof.
P. Bird acted as toastmaster.. The
>llowing selected according to ancient
actfrom all the campus were taken
: "Ed" Lazear, "Pat" Koontz, "Hal'
:ulburt, "Rags" Reighard, "Hank"
oyle,"Van" Van de Laare,"Tabe" Ta-
or," Walt" Staebler,"Fix" Fixel,"Kirk"
oagg, "Hub" Huebel, "Mick" Milli-
in. a
ICIiGAftIUA MAES ANNUAL
COTTON-TAIL HUNT TOMORROW
Not good tracking weather, must be
Imitted, but a little matter like that
ill probably not hinder the slaughter
cotton-tails when the tribe of Mich-
amua takes to the trail tomorrow
orning on its annual hunt of the
bbage eaters.
The braves will scour the woods be-
ween here and Whitmore, ending with
rabbit feast in a ple-face lodge on1
.e shores of the lake. Return will be
ade Saturday night by train. ,1
RYOUTS FOR GERMAN PLAY
TO BE HELD THIS AFTERNOON
(oepenickerster 120" Offers Places
for Twenty German Speaking
Students of Ability.f
The first tryout for the Deutscher
erein play, "Koepenickerstr. 120," to
presented in the early part of they
coad semester, will be held this af-
rmoon and persons wishing to tryl
it for cast positions are urgel to be
esent at this time. There are about1
enty positions to be filled, these
Ing about evenly divided between
ale and female characters. The try-
its will be held this afternoon from<
fYQ to 6:00 o'clock in room 203 Uni-
;rlty ball and at this time the names
all nersons wishing to compete willt

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NEWtAMPUS
CLUB PLANS
TOURNAMENT
u Iers aid Fncers Begin Work by
IWmtm ma Prvt ymum
V IT 'STF IS

Cosmopolitan Club Will Present a
Tableaux at Newberry Hall
Tomorrow Night.
SWORD DANCE TO BE PRODUCED.
The first of the series of "national
nights" scheduled by the Corda Fra-
tres-Cosmopolitan club will be pre-
sented before the Students Christian
association Saturday at 7:30 o'clock in
Newberry hall. The affair, which will
be one of the biggest events of the
year will be staged by the Japanese
students.
There will be six special features
in the show, including a stereopticon
lecture on the scenic beauty of Japan
by Professor S. Takahara.
The tableaux will be the most spec-
tacular feature on the program. It
will depict a warrior's farewell to his
son on his departure to the battlefield.
Commander Perry's interview with
representatives of the Strogen, and
American Japanese friendship will be
impersonated by talented artists. Jiu
jitsu by Yamada and Kanata will be
a novel attraction. A quartette, con-
sisting of Yamada, Monimatsu, Odachi,
and Konichi, will sing a few songs in
Japanese. A fencing duel has been
arranged between Yamada and Tonou-
chi, the Japanese exponents of sword
art in this city. Another feature will
be a sword dance by Tonouchi and
Morimatsu.
The opening ceremony will probably
be performed by President W. W.
Welsh, who'will sketch the general
plan of the work of the club for the'
coming year. Following the enter-'
tainment there will be a reception and
refreshments will be served. The
next number of the series is the "Chin-
ese Night," which comes two weeks
later..

FRESH LIT C0O MlTIEES
NA31IED FOR ENSUING YEAR
H. Pelham, president of the fresh
lit class has appointed the following
committees:
Social, Ray Ballentyne, chairman,
P. Clancey, A. P. Bick, C. H. Marshall,
Francis McClune, E. Rohns, L. Royce.
Financial, 0. R. Deahl, chairman,
and Emma Rodehamel.
Auditing, W. J. Campbell, chairman,
L. Gochenour, W. R. Woodward.
Preparations are being made for the
first social event. This will be a recep-
tion and dance at Barbour gymnasium
Saturday afternoon November 30 at
3:00 o'clock.
Will Give Henry VIII First Reading,
"Henry VIII," which has never been
played in Ann Arbor before, will be
presented by Prof. T. C. Trueblood's
class in Shakespearean reading Tues-
day evening, Nov. 26, in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall at 8:00, o'clock.
TICKETS FOR WEEKLY UNION
DANCE HAVE A RAPID SXLE:
Tickets for the Michigan Union
dance tomorrow night are meeting
with a ready sale as over 90 out of the
100 have been sold already. Professor
and Mrs. Louis A. Strauss and Profes-
sor and Mrs. Gordon Stoner will be
the chaperones.

S(R'(E It PLA ERlS ('ONTI NUE
P1? ACTICEF ON FE hilY FIELD,
Prospects Good for Mmy Gulles Next
Seasomi as Michigan .May Euler
Intercollegiate League. -
Lured on by the balmy Indian sum-
mer weather, the soccer enthusiasts
continue to kick and drible the inflated
sphere well. up and down their partic-
ular section of Ferry field.
With but faint prospects of another
public contest being arranged, the soc-
cer practices have been attracting on-
ly the most ardent devotees of the game
during the past two weeks. As the
number of these does not exceed twen-
ty it is highly improbable that the
Ferry field club house will be kept
open after Thanksgiving, which is the
date that preparations have been made
to close it.
In the brief period of time that the
University of Michigan has known the
game of soccer football, it has gained
a firm hold on the affections of fifty
students who participated in its play-
ing this fall and on many who were in-
bition game between the halves of a
freshman football match. Soccer may
terested in the watching of the exhi-
from now on be considered a perma-
nent branch of Michigan athletics,
and it would not be surprising if next
spring found the university represent-
ed by a soccer eleven, contesting for
premier honors with the state colleges
that will constitute the membership of
the Michigan inter-collegiate soccer
football league.-
LEAGUE PARTY AT BARtBOUR y
GYM TOIIkX TO lIE NOVELTY.

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Football Player's Captive is Jailed,
G. I. John son, a nero, who attempt-
ed to burglarize the Allmendinger res-
idence on Spring Ave. last summer and
who was capturedl after a hot chase by
E. C. AlimCendinger, '14P, the foot-
ball player, was yesterday convicted
of the offense and sentenced to six
Mmontims in jail.
W. 1. ltobnson Speaks to Geologists,
W. I. Robinson, '12, read a paper
yesterday evening before the geolo'6gi-
cal seminary, discussing the recent
work of Prof. Joseph Barrell of Yale
which dealt with the criteria for the
detection of ancient delta deposits.
Saxophone Trio Will Play at Union"
The first Wright saxophone trio par-
ty will be held at the Union tonight.
The affair will be strictly informal and
dancing will start at 9:00 o'clock
sharp. Tickets may be obtained at the
door.
FORIMERt DAILY EDITOR TALKS
TO CLASS IN JOURN.ALIS3.
'Lee A White, '10, managing editor
of The Michigan Daily for the college
year '10-11, a member of the staff of
tho D trit Na~ dd s d'OP' Prof.

If Iegents Decide Favorably Society
Will llesuite' Work in
Waterman Gym.
Unwilling to wait until the board of
regents reach a decision on the peti-
tion for the encouragement of indoor
sports, followers of the arts of boxing
and fencing have engaged the services
of Major Burdette as instructor, and
have arranged with him for the use
of his private gymnasium every Wed-
nesday night, beginning next week.
During the season which lasts until
spring vacation, a regular series of
contests will be staged in both events
and as a closing climax, a boxing and
fencing tournament will be held. If
the regents pass favorably on the peti-
tion-, the club will abandon its projects
and go back Ito Waterman gymnasium
where all the facilities for the culti-
vation of its sports, such as floor space
and instruction would be furnished
free of cost. Because some may wish
to join in this movement, who were
not present when the plans were dis-
cussed and decided upon, the first
meeting of the new organization on
next Wednesday night at 7:30 in Ma-
jor Burdette's gymnasium over Wag-
ner Bros. store, will be open to all in-
terested.
Wrestling will be handled in the
same manner that it w'as last year in
the event of the petition being shelved.
Dr. May will himself arrange. a tour-
nament for the mat artists in Water-
man gym, and provide suitable tro-
phies to be competed for by the men
of the different weights. This year
the tournaments will take place in
February, a month earlier than the
same event last year, and already the
room set aside for that purpose at the
gym is crowded every afternoon by
struggling couples with the ambition
to win the championship of their
weight.
JUNIOR LITS DANCE TONIGHT.
New England.Customs to be Featured
at Initial Party.
New England, its quaintness, cus-
toms, and well known characteristics,
will feature the first junior lit dance
of the year, which will be held this ev-
ening in Barbour gym. The special
committee has worked hard to pre-
pare novelties for the occasion and
will have several surprises for the
dancers. In an endeavor to get a
larger proportion of the class out this
year than formerly the committee has
asked the men and women of the class
to come separate y.
The music will start promptly at
7:30 o'clock and dancing will lst un-
til 11:00 o'clock. "Ike" Fischer will
lead the orchestra and will feature
several appropriate numbers. The
chaperones will be Prof. and Mrs. J.
C. Hilders
Ticke s may be purchased from the
committee or at the door for 35 cents.
LOST GEOLOGY MANUSCRIPTS
FINALLY BROUGHT TO LIGHT
The writings and drawings of Dr.
Alexander Winshell, former professor
of geology in this university, which
were recently unearthed in the state
capitol at Lansing, are the property
of the Michigan Geological and Biolog-
ical Survey, and will be published in
an appropriate form.
When this work of Prof. Winshell
was first completed in the early 40's
or 50's, printing had not reached its
present stage of perfection, and the
firm which expected to publish the
manuscripts in book form refused to
do so on account of the expensefor

plates. The folios were then placed
in one of the offices of the. geological
--7-~ - 1~~~ ~ '^ ^ ~-- '^

Glass Blower Entertains Chemists.
Howard L. Cox, glass blowing expert
of the Frederick Stearns Co., of De-
troit, featured the meeting of the Pres-
cott club held yesterday afternoon in
the amphitheatre of the chemistry
building. Mr. Cox gave an exceedingly
novel and interesting exhibition of
glass blowing, accompanied by an ex-
planatory lecture by Dr. S. C. Lind.
The meeting was well attended and
much interest was manifested.
Dixie Club to Iold Initial Dance.
The Dixie club will hold its first
dance of the year at the Packard Acad-
emy on Nov. 29. All students and fac-
ulty members from the south, whether
members of the club or not, are invited
to attend. Tickets will go on sale
Monday and may be purchased from
Lowenburg, Yerger, McFarland, Wood,
McElroy, Helm and McNair. The
price is $1.00.
Socialists Hold Third Party of Series.
Thirty-five members of the Inter-
collegiate Socialist society and their
friends, last night at Barbour gymna-
sium last night at the first dance of
the series which the club has planned
for the year. A smoker will be given
at the Union some time next week.

Many Orders for Alumni Directory,
More than 4,000 orders have been re-
ceived by Secretary Smith for the 1912
alumni directory which was published
early in the fall. The book contains
the names, occupations and locations,
as near as possible, of all Michigan
graduates. It is the third directory
published by the university and here-
after it will appear every ten years..
The book sells for $2.00 a copy.
IWKEYE CLUB IS L ATEST4
SECTIONAL ORGANIZATION.
Another sectional club was formedj
recently when 40 Iowa studensts metI
at the Michigan Union and organized
the Hawkeye club. A constitution1
was adopted and the following officers
were elected: C. S. Pryor, '13L, pres-
ident; M. Noble, '12, vice-president;
M. F. Wells, '13L, correspondent; J.
W. Cory, '14L, secretary, and J. C.d

0 rol( ew111L A VS, a retUCS l tu.
Myste ry, dark and dank in purport, Scott's news-pap er class yesterday
shrouds those in charge of the Wom- morning on "Bohemia versus Journal-
ens League party, to be held in Bar- ism." Mr. White discussed the change
bour gymnasium this afternoon. Some- in morals which most progressive pa-
thing curious and interesting is on tihe pers arc udergoing, and in connec-

program, All members are requested
to be present to witness the ceremo-
nies which are scheduled to begin at
4:00 o'clock sharp.
ili res i Elected to Chemical Society.
The Alchemists, the honorary chem-
ical society, on Wednesday night elect-
ed the following men to membership:

tioll with that change, the part that
young men with college educations are
playing in bringing it about.
The next speaker to address the
class will be Mr. E. G. Pipp, manag-
ing editor of the Detroit News, who
wil lecture in West hall next Tues-
day mornimg at 9:00 o'clock. His su'-
ject will be "Confidence as a Newspa-
per Asset," and the lecture will be
open to any who are interested in the
subject.

Peerson, '13, treasurer. A series of Robert Craine, Spencer Scott, Robert
dinners and smokers will be given in Caughey, H. W. Hunt, and 0. H. Mitch-
the near future. el.

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