100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The

W %

Mlhigan

Dal y

I AILED7
ADDRESS

TO ANY
S $3.00

r

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1912.

PRICE FIVE G

t.

r

l "M'S"

'ED TO

7 WARRIORS
arded Last Night by Com-
e Acting Upon List
bmitted by Coach

IVED LETTERS
CORNELL GAMES.
eted Football Captain
Year; Date

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor--Thursday
fair.
University Observatory-Wednesday
7:00 p. m., temperature 52.8; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
58.2; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 35.4; average wind velocity,
9 miles per hour.
PROF. R. M. WENLEY TO SPEAK
AT KALAMAZOO CLUB SMOKER.
Profesor R. M. Wenley will speak
before the Kalamazoo Club next week.
The occasion will be the smoker to be
held by the club at the Union next
Tuesday at 7:30 p. m. Members of the
club will .also give short talks. All
Kalamazoo men are urged to attend,
whether they are members of the club
as yet or not. Standard smoker re-
freshments in the shape of doughnuts
and cider will be in evidence.
DEAN BATES TO
DRAFT NEW BILL
Prominent Men Desire Change in Ex-
isting Reform and Proba-
tion Laws.

Captain.

Il'°

idinger.

ghitt.
Musser.

TICKETS FOR UNION DANCE
GO ON SALE THIS EVENING.
Tickets for the Michigan Union
dance Saturday will go on sale at the
Union today at 5:00 o'clock. The orig-
inal drawing of the cover design for
the Union dance program which was
placed on exhibition has disappeared$
and another engraving will have to be
made before more dance programs can
be printed. Union officials are hoping
that the suovenir hunter who appropri-
ated the drawing will return it.
The committee in charge of the
dance is: Clement Quinn'13, chairman,
H. Beach Carpenter, '14, Carol C. Mills,
'14, and John P. Naylson, '15E.
SOPH LITS TO HOLD FIRST
SMOKER AT UNION TONIGHT.
Tonight the oph lits will hold their
first smoker of the year at the Michi-
gan Union. Over sixty tickets have
already been sold, and a big attend-
ance is expected. Professor David Fri-
day of the economics department will
give a short address and Harry Gault,
class football manager, will respond
to "What might have been." There
will be a number of other short talks
and several musical numbers by mem-
bers of the class. Smokes,' cider, and'
doughnuts will be the diet for the ev-
ening. Every soph lit should be on
hand at 7:30 o'clock.
MICHIGAN DAILY CIRCULATION
EXCEEDS PREVIOUS RECORDS,
Records taken thus far show the
circulation of The Michigan Daily
this year to exceed all pre-
vious records. A gain of four
hundred in the daily circula-
tion and of six hundred and fifty in
the Sunday edition is shown. After
December first, a special inducement
to new subscribers will be offered in
a reduced rate which is expected to
increase its present circulation. For
the remainder of the college year,
commencing December first, The Mich-
igan Daily will be delivered by
carrier for $2.00 or sent by mail for
$2.50.
SOCIALISTS WILL
HEAR NTED MEN
Jack London and Ellis 0. Jones Will
Appear Here Under Auspices
of Local Society.
TO HOLD $DANCE HIS EVENING.
Ellis O. Jones, editor of "Life," and
Jack London are among the prominent
speakers whom the Intercollegiate So-

HOLD BANQUET IN DETROIT
TO HONOR GOVERNOR ELECT
The Detroit Alumni club of the Fer-
ris Institute will give a banquet at the
Hotel St. Clair on Saturday, November
23. The .dinner is to be held in honor
of W. F. Ferris, who was at one time
president at this institute and who was
recently elected governor of Michigan
on the Democratic ticket. Mr. Ferris
will be the speaker of the evening,
.and G. E. Masselink from the institute,
and others will respond. Both the
Ypsilanti club and the local club" are
invited. C. W. Bradrick, '13L, presi-
dent of this organization thinks at
least thirty people will go from here.
SOPH LIT COM3ITTEES GIVE
OUT PLANS FOR COMING YEAR
At the *soph lit meeting held Tuesday'
afternoon the social committee report-
ed that the first dance would be held
on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Union.
The dates for the others will be given
out shortly. The dinner and smoker
committee announced the first smoker
for tonight.. A series of four dinners
has also been planned but the class
decided they preferred separate tickets
for each dinner rather than a fixed
price for the series. The auditing
committee was announced by the pres-
ident: Chairman Clyde Hasley, Rus-
sell Ulrich, and Fay Allen.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS PLAN ON
SOCIAL PROGRAM OF YEAR.
President A. O. Williams of the jun-
ior engineer class has announced the
social committee for the year, as fol-
lows: Chairman, A. C. Fletcher; A.
Eckert; W. J. Thienes; W. H. Schom-
berg; H. J. Trum. A series of four
dinners will be held on December 2,
February 12, March 24, April 29, the
February dinner to be given in con-
nection with the junior lits. Tickets
may now be obtained from any mem-
ber of the committee for $2.00. The
first dance will take place on Decem-
ber 11, another on March 14, and the
last will be a combined dance with the
junior lits some time in April.

1)1,. ANGELL LECTURING TO
INTERNATIONAL LAW CLASS.
Is Probably the Last Time That Pres-
ilent-Emeritus Will Pur Ise
Active Work.
Dr. Angell has resumed active teach-
ing for what will probably be the last
time. He is delivering a series of lec-
tures before Prof. J. C. Reeves class in
international law, which is the class
that he formerly taught,
The subject which Dr. Angell is tak-
ing up is the law of war, with especial
attention to the positions of belliger-
ants and neutrals. The lectures come
Wednesday at 9:00 o'clock, and are
given in room 102 of the economics
building.
The arrangement will continue until
Christmas,Prof. Reeves being in Wash-
ington, D. C., doing research work on
questions of international boundaries.
While the lectures are not open to the
general public, there are a few vacant
seats in the room, and outsiders will
be permitted to attend.
FEW FACULTY MEN
BELONG TO UNION
Only 164 Out of Oyer 500 Instructors
Have Affixed Their Iame
to Membership.

GOV. OSBORN FAVORS

TESTIMONI,

DEBATERS TO
RECEIVE $50

PLAN.I

LITS

HIVE, LARIGEST

NUMBER, I

e are the men who will receive
football "M's." The insignia
warded last evening at a meet-
a. committee composed of gradu-
nager, acting upona list sub-
by Coach Yost before 4he left
rbor. The basis of awarding the
y letters was participation in
the Pennsylvania or the Cornell
Seventeen men received letters
ipared with sixteen given last

i of Varsity captain for
-ill occur at the time of
y football picture, the
,h has not been settled

ECT MAN IN

CLASS

not yet discovered any
ect man among the first
o rank in the class es-
e two Garrels brothers.
everal men have been
ess physiques which av-
toward the 100 imark.
e hundreds who have
gh the examination,
en perfect had he not
ed by his weight, other-
is of the tape hovered
ect section in a straight

statistics of the freshman class,
.er with the strength tests are
compiled and the average of this
addition will soon be completed.
May has issued a call to the
sh squad to report for their
nation this week.
LY HUNDRED J-LITS
ATTEND DINNER AT UNION.
rly a hundred junior lits turned
the first of the series of class
rs held at the Union last night.
J. R. Effinger, who was the
pal speaker of the evening, gave
joyable talk, becoming reminis-
bout some of the old days of the
sity. Others called on by "Carp"
nter, the toastmaster, were Jack
icott, "Chink" Bond, and Bruce
The musical part of the pro-
was furnished by "Bill" Dieke-

At the invitation of several proni-
nent Detroit men Dean H. M. Bates of
the law department will draft .a bill
for the reformation of the probation
and reform laws throughout the state.
The dean will model his draft after the
laws now in force in Wisconsin. The
bill will be presented to the next leg-
islature and the chances that it will
be made a law seem to be pretty bright.
"In many instances the prisons and
reformatories have proven to be reg-
ular educational institutions in vice
for the young men and 'first offenders.'
This law will be directed at young men{
who commit minor offenses, whole-,
some men who have fallen for the first
time and who should not be imprison-
ed with old offenders, such as thugs
and thieves.
"Under the present system in vogue
in this and most other states, when a
man is brought before a police mag-
istrate charged with some minor of-
fense such as drunkenness, although
he's young, and in court for the first
time, he is sentenced to jail along with
crooks of every description where evil
influences may prey upon him. Fur-
thermore he is disgraced in the eyes of
his friends and no opportunity is given
him to escape the stigma of a prison
record, But under the proposed law,
he would be examined carefully by the
magistrate and if it appeared that he
was a good, wholesome man, with no
previous police court record, that he,
had a desire to do better in the future,
he would be released under the watch
of a probation officer.
"This law then, has two main fea-
tures, the segregation of persons com-
mitting minor offenses from those
committing great ones, and second, the
parole and probation feature."
Governor Osborn, who was in the
city Tuesday night to attend the fo-
ball smoker, when asked his opinion of
such law said:
"It would be admirable. Our pres-
ent law directed at such evils is neith-
er adequate nor comprehensive
enough. We now have no place where
the petty offenders can be sent and
not be in grave danger of coming out
worse men than when they were sen-
tenced."
Catholic Students to Hold Party.
Some of the women of the Catholic
church will give an acquaintance par-
ty tonight at Thomas Hall, Elizabeth
St., from 8:00 to 10:00 o'clock. All
of the Catholic women of the university
are cordially invited to attend. Dur-
ing the evening refreshments will be
served and a good time for all is as-
sured.

VEREIN TO GIVE

cialist society has engaged to speak production. The choice was announc-

GERMAN COMEDY
"Koepenickerstr. 120," a Light Drama
by Gustav von Moser is
Decided Upon.
HERR C. LEIDICH GIVES TALK.
"Koepenickerstr. 120," one of Gustav
Moser's comedies, has been selected
by the Deutscsher Verein for its annual

here this winter. Although definite<
dates have not yet been made with all
of the desired men, many promises as
well as some definite engagements as-
sure the society of arranging the best
series of its kind that has ever been
presented in Ann Arbor.
Alexander Irvine, famous author,
pastor, public speaker, and soldier, has
been engaged to speak Monday, De-
cember 9, and Harry W. Laider, na-
tional organizer of the Intercollegiate
Socialist society of Yale university will
speak December 18. Jack London is
also expcted to speak the latter part
of next month. Other men whose en-
gagements are not definitely settled,
are Woodbridge N. Ferris, governor-
elect, and Prof. John Kennedy of the
economics department of the univer-
sity of Chicago.
This year the society has increased
150 per cent and its work 'has grown
to the extent that three study sections
had to be formed. Members and their
friends will dance in Barbour gym
this evening at 8:00 o'clock. Tickets
are 50 cents.
Fresh Laws to Hold "Purity" Smoker.s
"Purity" in the classroom, on the
campus, in athletics and in every walk
of life will be the keynote of the first
fresh law smoker of the year which
will be held at the Union on next Mon-
day night. Dean Henry M. Bates, of1
the law department, "Eddie" Saier,
"Hap" Haff and A. E. Bing will make
short speeches, and music, both vocal
and instrumental, will be rendered.'
Cigars aid cider will be distributed.
Tickets for the affair will cost 25 cents.

el at the dance of the society last night
in Barbour gymnasium.
The play has a Berlin atmosphere,
and is based on the universal theme of
the city man's love for the country,
and the country man's longing for the
life of the towns. "Koepenickerstr.
120" has exceptional literary merit,
and this, together with its light com-
edy, makes it especially valuable for
student production.
The date has not yet been set, but
the tryouts will be held at once. Pros-
pects must sign up' Friday afternoon
at 5:00 o'clock in room 203 University
hall. The trials will be extended over
about two weeks, to enable all candi-
dates to have sufficient time for try-
outs.
The play requires an exceptionally
large cast, about twenty characters
being needed for the production. The
parts are equally divided between men
and girls.
Preceding the dance, Herr C. Leid-
ich, president of the Harmonie Verein,
[of Detroit,delivered a lecture on "Ram-
bles Through Germany," at Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall before an apprecia-
tive audience. The lecture was illus-
trated by slides secured by the
speaker in his travels in the Father-
land. It was* delivered in German.
Prof. Rich Testifies in Lansing.
Prof. E. D. Rich of the mechanical
engineering department went to Lan-
sing yesterday morning to render ex-
pert testimony in an engineering case
in that city. He returned last night.

Although the Michigan Jnion this
year has, by far, the largest total mem-
bership in its history, the number of
faculty names on the roster is unusu-
ally meagre. On4y 164 instructors and'
university officers have joined to date,
which number is considered an unsat-
isfactory showing inasmuch as there
are over 500 members of the Michigan
faculty..
Of the 164 teachers who are affiliated
with the Union this year, 134 have tak-
en out yearly membership cards, 24
are life members, and six are partici-
pating life members. In view of the
strong general support given to the
Michigan Union by the faculty, it is
considered surprising that only one-
third of this body has entered into ac-
tive participation in Union affairs. 1
By departments, the" literary college1
can claim the largest faculty member-
ship in the Union, with the engineer-
ing and law departments trailing along
as rather poor seconds. This is much1
the same order in which student mem-
bership figures by departments rank.
I'NIO MEMBERSHIP LISTS
NOW EXCEED THE 2,300 1IARK
The new additions to the Michigant
Union membership list are being made
daily. Last evening the record book
showed 2,301 members for the college
year 1912-'13. Two weeks ago the Un-
ion management was of the. opiniont
that the 2,300 mark would not be
reached this year, but now all inter-
ested in Union affairs are looking
ahead to still greater gains. The slo-
gan, at the present time, is "2,500."
The total membership of the Union
last year was 1270. Today, the Mich-
igan Union has 89 life members, 220
participating life members, and 2,301
regulars. The grand total, 2,610, is
more than twice the number of any
previous year.
Japanese Students to Present Sketches
"Japanese Night" is the first of the
series of national nights to be present-
ed this fall under the auspices of the
Corda Fratres-Cosmopolitan club. The
affair will be staged in Newberry hall.
Saturday evening, and the actors will
be Japanese students who will present
sketches depicting the quaint life of
the Flowery Kingdom.
Rev. Knepper to Give Second Lecture.
Rev. George W. Knepper will give
his second lecture on South America
this afternoon at 4:10 o'clock in the
rooms of the Bible Chair building at
444 South State street. This lecture
will deal especially with the people of
South America. These lectures are
given for the student body and all stu-
dents are urged to be present as well
as other people who are interested.
Graduate Writes for Detroit Paper.
Lee A. White, '10, has a feature story
in the Sunday News Tribune on-"Tung-

It. E. Olds, Automobile Manufacture
of Lansing, Provides Sum of
$300.00 to be Given to
Varsity M en.
IS HOPED THAT TIS GIFT
MAY BE MADE PERMANENT
I)ebates With Northwestern and. Chi-
cago Will Be Held on
January 17.
Through the generosity of a friend
of the university, the honor debater
will receive testimonials of $50.00 each
again this year. R. E. Olds, of Lan
sing, the automobile manufacturer
has provided the sum of $300.00 to b
divided equally among the men wh
shall represent Michigan in the inter-
collegiate debates of 1912-'13. It i
hoped that this testimonial may b
made permanent..
The contests this year in the Cen-
tral Debating League are schedule
for the evening of Jan. 17, Michigan
meeting Chicago in Ann Arbor, and
Northwestern in Evanston at that time
''he question this year is, "Resolved
that the plan of banking. reform pro
posed by the National Monetary Com
mission should be adopted by Con
gress."
The society preliminaries have been
held, and the interdepartmental de
bates which will decide the teams,
are scheduled for next week. Th
dates have been changed from thos
originally announced. Jeffersonian
meeting Alpha Nu Wednesday, Nov.
27, and Webster contesting with Adel
phi Friday, Nov. 29. Both contests wil
be held in room B of the law building
at 8:00 o'clock.
Wright Trio to Play for Dance.
The first of the Wright saxophone
trio dances will be held at the Union
tomorrow night. The tickets may -b
secured either at the Union or b:
phoning 319 or 236.
DR. F. N. BONINE, '6, COMMENDS
SPIRIT SHOWN AT SMOKER.
Dr. F. N. Bonine, '86, was in'the cit:
Tuesday and attended the Michigan
Union, smoker. He was well pleased
with the pirit shown there, and said
that the Michigan Union was. the on
thing that made him feel at home when
in Ann Arbor.
Dr. Bonine was captain of the track
team in '85, which was the first team
of any western school to compete with
the eastern colleges in track athletics
At this meet which was held in New
York, he won the 100 yard dash o
which feat he said he was mor
proud than of anything he ever did.

FRESH PHARMIC COM1il
APPOINTED BY Ph

Fresh pharmic committees have be
appointed by William L.'-Seibert, pre
dent of the class as follows:
Social: R. G. Arner, chairman, O.
Brine, and Osborn.
Auditing: E. Woodhouse, chairmt
C. E. Peat, and T. C. Kier. The otl
committees will be named at the nE
meeting of the class to be held Monc
at 4:00 o'clock in room 303, chemi
building. At the same time the soc
events of the class will be planned.

A

Initiate This Afternoon.
e messengers of the Gods,
teir sacred secrets to the
ars of twelve mortals this
With the tolling of the
chimes the mortals will
e flag pole and there await
f the deities from the por-

GAL FIVE
Turbine Students Will Take Trip.
Members of the mechanical eng
neering department taking courses i
steam turbines, conveying machiner:
and steam boilers will make an inspec
tion trip this Saturday to the Del Ra
Plant of the Edison Electric Co., <
Detroit. Mr. C. H. Fessenden of th
mechanical department will tal
charge of the trip.
Engineers Return From South Bem
Prof. J. E. Emswiler and a party
eight engineers, who spent three da:
in testing the engines of tike Sing(
Mfg. Co., at South Bend, Ind., returne

Lecture in Ohio.
an of the medical

]

Treasurer's Books
the state account-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan