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November 20, 1912 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-20

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The

Michigan

Daily

a

I-

MAILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

I

No. 43.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.

PRICE FIVE C

OF All SMOKERS

TRIBUTE TO THE TEAM

ent Situation in Re-
tic Relatios With
leges is Hotly
scussed.
rHUSIASTIC
S CROWD BIG YM
all Heroes Are Given
tion by Throng

THE WEATHER MAN

Forecast
day, fair ,
perature,
winds.

for Ann Arbor-Wednes-
no decided change in tem-
moderate southwesterly

FORESTERS CO TO CONVENTION,
Faculty Men Will Speak at Annual
Meeting in Saginaw.
Profs. Filibert Roth, P. S. Lovejoy,
O.L. Sponsler and Mr. L.J. Young, of
the forestry department, will leave for
Sagnaw today to attend the annual
convention of the Michigan forestry
association. They will also be accom-
panied by J. H. Pottinger, president
of the forestry club. All of these men
are to take an active part in the pro-
gram.
Prof. Roth will talk on the "Present
Status of Forestry;" Prof. Lovejoy on
"Recent Legislation and Needed 'eg-
islation" and "With Forest Rangers in
the West;" Prof. Sponsler on "Wood-
lets and their Needs;" Mr. Young on
"Field Work at the University of
Michigan," and Mr. Pottinger will take
'part in the membership conference.
The convention will start with an
evening session and wilr continue all
day Thursday.
IN NEAR FUTURE

ARRANGE SERIES
OF FREE CLINICS
Homeopathic Department is Planning
Schedule of Special Clinics
to be Hela in January.
FACULTY TO RE IN CHARGE.
Announcements are being sent out
of the series of clinics which the Hom-
eopathic department is arranging for
the early part of January. These spe-
cial clinics will be for the benefit of
any practitioners who care to attend

FACULTY MEMBERS TO TRAVEL.
Regents Grant Three Professors Leave
of Absence for Journies
to Europe.
Three members of the university
faculty will travel abroad 'next 5um-
mer through leave of absence being
granted by the regents. Prof. Hugo
P. Thieme, of the French faculty, will
spend time in Paris and Italy investi.
gating curriculum methods in vogue
at the universities there. Prof Claude
H. Van Tyne, of the history depart-
ment, will spend the year in Europe
investigating historical documents in
the British museum and the National
library of Paris for the purpose of
securing data for his "History of the
American Revolution" which is in
course of completion.
Asst. Prof. Henry A. Gleason of the
botany department, will make a tour
of the world next fall, visiting the
principal European cities.
SCHULTE WINDS UP

of

PROGRAM FOR
COMING. YEAR

IS NON

University Observatory-Wednesday,
7.00 p. in., temperature 46.2; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
57.8; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 33.0; average wind velocity,
8 miles per hour.

the greatest university
and 'there is no reason
I not have athletic con-

i with the best that the country
ler." The speaker was Gov.
. Osborn, and the place was the
Michigan Union football
held in the combined gyms last
dy knows just how many enthu-
and loyal rooters crowded into
ran gym for the big gala get-
r of the year-the fact remains
was by far the largest number
resent on a similar occasion,
cold figures considerably over
was noise and over-bubbling
nough for ten times that num-
men.
before 7:00 o'clock the crowds
o push their way into Barbour.
ilmost the entire assemblage
.ted by 7:45, and when the ac-
ogram commenced at 8:05
there was not room enough left
south gym to squeeze a thin-
igh in edgewise-but there was
ad plenty up in the bare rig-
the gymnasium for yells to re-
te to their little souls' content,
11 thebhearts of the zealous loy-
own below.
s a grand climax to a season
and downs-a climax that in,
t to blush to a reassuring ex-
oft-heard criticism that NMich-
udents are never on hand to
nything but an invincible ag-
n.
v. Osborn Praises Tearn.
football season hasn't been all
could wish," said Gov. Os-
the course of a speech that
ith sincere earnestness and
ng vigor, "but it's been far
failure. We are proud of the'
f the men who have worked
to produce the winning com-
and who have succeeded to a
degree. There is nothing la-
e in the record of the 1912
nd this evening you men are
I here to honor that organi-
a a way that will never be for-'

titude of Michigan in athletics is un-
satisfactory. There is unrest in the
air, and that unrest is going to crop
out into action at no very distant
time."
Mr. Shields took occasion to compli-
ment Gov. Osborn on his successful
term of office as governor of Michigan,
and to extend the best wishes of Gov-
ernor-elect Woodbridge N. Ferris to
the football team and student body in
general.
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary department, devoted his talk to a
discussion of the advantages of the
Michigan Union.
"Conditions among the students at
Michigan are, probably better than ev-
er before," admitted Dr. Effinger, "but
there's ample opportunity for better-
ment. Improvement is sure to come,
for the large part, from the work of
an organization such as the Union.
Union Largest in Country.
"The Michigan Union now stands as
the largest undergraduate organization
in the country. The Harvard Union,
which ranks second, has a member-
ship less by several hundred than that
of our institution. Such a powerful
body will be the most forcible agency
for good that could possibly arise
from the student body."
"Brass Tacks" was the subject of a
talk by Frank Pennell, '12-'14L, stu-
dent speaker on the program.
"The greatest question in my mind
is: Aren'tA we too conservative?" said
Pennell. "Aren't we perhaps too wil-
ling to term a man a knocker who
works to better existing conditions?
"There can be no doubt but what the
present conditions of Michigan, as re-
gards athletic schedules, is far from
enviable. The natural solution would
seem to lie in the West, but we must
consider well before we act. There
are two mighty big sides to the ques-
tion. The Michigan Daily will under-
take shortly to put both sides of this
question before the student body u an
absolutely impartial sanner."
lReceive WiY rer2 n)mB bst.
Edward G. Kemp, '12-'14L, presided{
as master of ceremonies. A telegram
from Earl D. Fabst, '94L, congratulat-
ing the Union and the team, was. read
during the evening.
The band and combined musical
clubs played selections in the course
of the program, and all were enthusi-
astically receive.
The fact that the entire evening's
entertainment went through without
even minor delay or confusion is due
to the efforts of the committee in
charge, of which "Cam" Trible, '12,
was general chairman.

Coaches of Various Teams
Handed in Lists of Men
Deserving Insignia.

Have

COMMITTEE TO PASS ON MEN.
The identity of the mem who will re-
ceive "M's," "R's" and All-Fresh in-
signia as reward for services during
the football season just completed is
yet to be learned, owing to the fact
that the committee of coaches and ath-
letic association officials which makes
the awards, has not yet met to discuss
the lists which have been submitted
by the coaches of the three teams.
It is understood that the tutors of
the teams have already picked the men
they consider worthy of their insignia.
and turned in a list of names at _the
office of the athletic association. All
that., remains is for the committee to
pass formally on the men and then
make the awards.
Considerable surprise has been man-
ifested on the campus because the Var-
sity letters were not awarded before
the Union smoker in honor of the
team, and therefore no captain elect-
ed. Heretofore the captain of the team
has been elected before the Union af-
fair and has been called upon to re-
spond to a speech together with the re-
tiring captain.
As a matter of fact the Union smok-
er occurred earlier this season than in
preceding years, and for this reason
there was no opportunity for the "M"
men to elect their leader for next
year.
1)1R. (. R. PARKIN CRITICIZRS
AMERICA'S RHODES SCHOLARS.
Dr. George R. Parkin of Oxford, ex-
ecutive secertary of the Rhodes schol-
arship trust fund, severely criticized
the calibre of some of the students
now sent to Oxford from this country.
In speaking before the National Asso-
ciation of American Universities, now
meeting in Washington, D. C., Dr. Par-
kin divided the Rhodes scholars into
three classes. First were the high
grade students, second the mediocre
ones and third-"well it was a mystery
how they ever got into Oxford." He.
believes that merit should take prece-
dence over financial and social posi-
tion.
Commerce Club Holds Smoker Monday
Mr. Frederick B. Stevens, of the
Stevens Manufacturing company, De-
troit, Mich., will talk before the mem-
bers of the Commerce club at a smok-
er at the Union on Monday evening,
November 25.

and will be in charge of prominent
members of the Homeopathic faculty,
with the added assistance of Doctors
R. H. Stevens and S. H. Knight of De-
troit. Routine work of.the department
will be varied or suspended for the
benefit of the visiting physicians.
Any who have cases they wish to pre-
sent for examination, treatment or op-
eration should give notice of their
coming so that proper arrangements
can be made. Information may be ob-
tained from the superintendent of the
hospital or the dean of the depart-
ment. No fees whatever will be con-
nected with the course.
The schedule is as follows:
January 7.-10:00 o'clock to . noon-
General surgery; Dr. Smith.
1:30 to 3:30 o'clock-General medi-
cal clinic; Dr. Hinsdale.
3:30 o'clock.-Diseases of the eye;
Dr. Myers.
January 8.-9:00 o'clock to noon-Dis-
eases of the skin with stereoptican
lecture upon syphilis; Dr. Stevens.
1:30 o'clock-Surgical gynecology;
Dr. Kinyon.
January 9.-9:00 o'clock.-General
surgical clinic; Dr. Knight.
1:30 to 2:30-Nervous diseases; Dr.:
Dewey.
2:30 o'clock-Diseases of the nose
and throat; Dr. Myers.
January 10.-9:00 to 11:00 o'clock--
Genito urinary surgery; Dr. Burrett.
11:00 o'clock--What does homeopa-
thy stand for?; Dr. Hinsdale.
1:30 to 2:30 o'clock-General sur-
gery; Dr. Smith.
3:00 o'clock-Gynecology; Dr. Kin-J
yon
January 11.-9,00 o'clock-Medical;
and surgical clinics to be announced.
On the Monday evening preceding i
the series, the members of the faculty
and their wives will give a reception
to the visitors and students of the de-1
partment in the lower lecture room1
of the hospital. The nurses hon:e willl
be thrown open for dancing frow 9:00
until 11:00 o'clock.1
F. N. BRADFORD WINS SECOND 1
HhNRY STRONG SCHOLARSHIP
Francis N. Bradford, of Rayne, La.,
now a student in the graduate depart-
ment was yesterday given the second.
Henry Strong scholarship which is
valued at $250. The first of the schol-
arships was granted last month to
Robert B. Sturtevant, '14, of Detroit.
The two scholarships were given for.
the first time this fall in 1Michigan.

Cercle Francais Selects "Les Fourber-
ies de Scapi, a Farce by
Moliere, for Annual
Production.
PLAY COSEN BY SOCIETY
DEALS WITH ITALIAN LIFE.
Cercle Plans to Give Course of Lec-
tures and Two
Dances.
"Les Fourberies de Scapin," the
master farce of Moliere, has been
chosen by the Cercle Francais for its
annual play. It will be given at the
Whitney theater April 25, by a cast
chosen from the active members of

WORK AT MICHIGAN
Assistant Coach to Varsity Will Not
Return to Help Yost
Next Fall
HAS WORKED HARD FOR TEAM.,
"Indian" Schulte, Michigan's assist-
ant coach to the Varsity football team
has concluded his duties for the sea-
son. Yesterday the coach departed
for his home at Marcellus, Mich.,
wlere he expects to spend several'
weeks in recreation of the nature of
hunting and fishing.
Schulte will not return to Michigan
next season, owing to the fact that the
university athletic association desires
to engage a coach for the football sea-
son alone. Schulte has made a spe-
cialty of coaching tea'ms throughout
the college year, taking the football,
track and baseball teams in turn, and
for this reason did not feel that he
could come to terms with the athlet-
ic association for next football sea-
As first assistant to Yost this fall,,
the former Michigan star has proved
invaluable. Schulte has been on the
job every minute, helping 4o drill the
linemen into shape and taking care of
the more or less routine features of
practices. In addition to this Schulte
has proven of great service in taking
trips to, other universities with whose
teams Michigan had games scheduled,
for the purpose of getting a line on
their styles of play.
Though "Cap" Redden, who has
been engaged to take Schulte's place
has had a great amount of experience
as assistant to Yost, Schulte has set
him a high example in faithfulness1
and efficiency.
SENIOR LAWS AND SCRUB,
WILL NOT MEET THIS YEAR
Laws Emphatically Deny Truth of Oft1
Repeated Rumor of Post
Season Game.
Persisting even after repeated de-f
nials, the rumor has spread around
the campus that a final post-s sason1
game is to be played between the senr
ior laws, holders of the inter-class
championship and Andy Smith's prot-
eges, the scrubs.
That the scrubs are exceedingly afx-
ious to have the contest arranged, is
not a strange matter when it is con-
sidered that all fall they have served
as the buffers between the Varsity and
glory, and this game if resulting in a
victory would distribute a little of
that much desired glory among their

the society, and will be played, in the
French language.
This year's selection is radically dif-
ferent from previous plays given by
the society, as it deals with Italian life
of the seventeenth century. It is es-
pecially. suitable for student study
and reproduction.
The Cercle will give its customary
course of lectures this year,tand also
two dances, in addition to the play.
Associate memberships in the society
will be offered to students for fifty
cents, and to others for $1.00. These
will be on sale next week, and may be
secured from the French faculty, offi-
cers of the Cercle, or by mail from C.
W. Nicholson, 706 S. Thayer St.
The complete program for the year
follows:
Dec. 4.-"Le role de l'education oc-
cidentale dans development de la Tur-
quie moderne," M. Harry Wann.
Dec. 13.-"La Musique des Trouba-
dors et des Trouveres francais du XI
an XIV siecle." (Conference accom-,
pagnee de chant) M. Jean Beck.
Jan. 16.-Soiree Musicale, litteraire,
et dans ante.
Jan. 22.-"Salammbo" de Gustave
Flaubert, M. Percival Fay.
Feb. 19.-"Le Theatre d'Edmond
Rostand," M. William T. Daugherty.
Feb. 27.-Soiree Dansante.
Mar. 12.-"La Maison de Balzac," M.
Rene Talamon.
Mar. 19.-"Le Bretagne," M. James
Bird.
April 23.-"Les Fourberies de Scap-
in," M. John Effinger.
April 25.-"Les Fourberies de Scap-
in," (Moliere).
MICHIGAN IS NOT ENTERED.
Cross Country Team Will Not Be Sent
to Cornell.
Michigan will send no cross coun-
try team to the annual fall matches at
Cornell, Nov. 23.
"The Michigan team was not enter-
ed," stated Trainer Farrell last even-
ing, "though I think it was largely by
an oversight. I do not belive any ofus
thought their entries closed so early."
Though Michigan was not entered it
is belived that the real reason for not
sending a team to Cornelle was the
fact that not enough interest was
shown in the cross country running
to insure a team capable of hdlding
up Michigan's reputation in the east-
ern matches.
Tryouts were recently held by the
cross country club but it is under-
stood the results of the run were none
too satisfactory to the captain of the
team.
ZOOLOGICAL STAFF DESIRES
TO USE TAX FREE ALCOHOL.
At a recent meeting of the zoologi-
cal staff, a movement was started to
secure legislation allowing the greater
use of tax-free alcohol for technical
purposes in the laboratories. The
rigid enforcement of a law which was
passed 40 years ago limiting the use
of tax-free alcohol to the preservation
of specimens, is responsible for the
steps taken by the staff. Unde the
working of this old law three kinds of
alcohol must be kept on hand con-
stantly by every laboratory doing any
technical work and this envolves con-

V't know all that I once did
ichigan's present dilemma in
I do know, however, that
ws are not going to see your
,y go back into an athletic af-
where she cannot walk inde-
y with head erect. Michigan
to stand alone if necessary.
only affiliate and join forces
er schools when that course
ntly honorable.
e all heard the expression,
Conference,'" continued the
ecutive of the state. "Well, .I
that far; but I will say that
nation of five big universities
iddle west, for the purpose of
;ompetition, would be a splen-
tReks Athletic Situation.
1a C. Shields, '96L, chairman,
sta Democratic committee, al-
a forceful and interesting dis-
of Michigan's position on the
rap.
man who once captained a
n bseball team, and who has
iad Vie athletic welfare of the
:y especially at heart, I would
something has got to happen
>lverine athletic camp. There's
be some radical change agi-

JUNIOR LITS WILL FEATURE
PURITANISM AT FIRST DANE E
Final preparations have been made
to give the junior lit Plymouth Rock
party a New England atmosphere
from start to finish, Dances, music
and all will be featured by a Puritan,
quaintness.
The dance will be held in Barbour
gym Friday from 7:30 to 10:30. Stag-
ging is in order and class members
should secure tickets at once from
members of the social committee. The
price is 35 cents.
Prof. Van Tyne Comes Back From Trip
Prof. C. L. Van Tyne has just return-
ed from the upper peninsula where he
delivered a series of five lectures on
the Escanaba circuit of the university
extension course. In his absence his

AGE COMPETES WITH YOUTH
IN CHEERING FOR VARSITY.
Perhaps Michigan did not have a
more enthusiastic supporter at the Cor-
nell game than Mrs. Mary Bruegger,
aged 75, of Detroit. It was the first
football game she had ever witnessed,
anad when the oval ball was brought
into play, she began to quizz her
grandson, a student in the literary de-
partment, about the technicalities of
the game. As the game progressed
and Michigan began to pile up scores,
Mrs. Bruegger caught the contagion of
the rooting section spirit, and vied
with the Michigan supporters in dis-
play of encouragement to .the Varsity.

5c

This

Week

Only

ranks. But oi the other hand, the
senior laws reason that in such a test,
they would have nothing to gain and
everything to lose. As it now stand:
they are the recognized champs of the
campus and in that role have absorb-
ed all the prestige which goes hand in
glove with that position.
As the near lawyers, when inter-
viewed today, emphatically denied ev-
en the possibility of any truth in the
rumor, lovers of the gridiron pastime
must resign themselves to the long
and dreary wait intervening between

Get one for your scrap book. Send one home to your
folks. Only a few left at news stands and book stores.

ly's at fault
f Michigan
- +hi same

Cornell Slame

Poster

Program

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