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October 04, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sul

ibe Now For

ie

Michigan

Daily

I

! TAILED TI
ADDPRESS

3.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1912.

PRICE

T a

NO

1s

ICES UPON

Y FIELD

ER MAN KEEPS VARSITY
SCRIMMAGING AND A
UOLS SIGNAL DRILL IS
'ITUTED.
AVERAGES 164 LBS.
Lineup for Varsity Team
ows an Average Weight
oi IN) 1-4 Pounds.
idue amount of moisture that
down yesterday afternoon
rry field a bit slippery under
Yost contented himself by
he team through a long stiff
rill and pushing scrimmage
desirable class. Just whether
weather or whether the Boss
the team needed a bit more
learning what each signal
r is uncertain, but at any
e faithful scrubs were not
in to bury their faces in mud.

Weather Forecast at University Ob-
servatory.
Temperature 7 o'clock 57.0.
Maximum temperature 24 hours
preceding 7 p. m. 62.4.
Minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding 7 p. m. 42.8.
Rainfall .014.
Average wind velocity 9.
Friday colder with southwesterly
winds.
NOTED NEGRO EDUCATOR
SPEAKS HERE OCT. 14.
Booker T. Washington Has Been Se.
cured by the Oratorical
Association.
Booker T. Washington, the noted
negro scholar and educator, has been
secured by the Oratorical Association
to speak in University Hall Monday
evening, October 14. He will take as
his subject "The Education of the Ne-
gro in the South." Washington last
appeared before an Ann Arbor audi-
ence twelve years ago, at which time
Ex-President James B. Angell was
quoted as saying, "That (Washington's
address) is the high water mark of
effective public speaking on this plat--
form."
The lecture will be open to the pub-
lic but seats will be reserved for the
members of the Oratorical Association.
"WHAT'S WHAT" IS'
MICHIGAN BOOSTER1
Nei Publication Proves Athletic Rec-
ord Best in West
and South.

WILL HOLD

OPEN-AIR
MASSMEETING
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION HAS DE-
CIDED TO DO AWAY WITH OLD
RALLIES IN UNIVERSITY HALL.
TO BE HELD ON FERRY FIELD

*
*
*
x:
W
*
*:

Students to Assemble About an
Before Case Game
Begins.

Hour

* * * * * * * * * * *
YOU'LL AGREE SOME-DAY. *
-- *
A few rough necks got out on *
the streets last night, played *
horse with a few freshmen, and *
then sneaked home to put down *
in their diaries an account of *
their heroism. What does this *
sort of fun cost? *
It costs your university friend- *
ships out in the state in a year *
when they are most needed; it *
brands you as traitors to the law *
that has been placed in the best *
interests of the institution that *
you are asking to furnish you *
with an education. You are *
doing something that will bring *
you regret in later years for the *
certain harm which your pres. *
ent perspective fails to permit *
you to gauge. *
Those upperclassmen who *
forgot their duty to their univer-
sity and to the younger men last *
night, by egging on the attacks, *
can make some atonement by *
getting out tonight, and putting *
a final quietus to further out- *
breaks. The welfare of Michi-
gan is worthy of at least that *
much of your time and consider- *
ation for all the benefits that it *
is giving you. *
* * * -* * * * * * * *

Student Council and Union
Against Hazing by F
and' Sophs

a . J

UNDERCLASSMEN AGAIN
DISREGARD FACULTY

UPPER CLASSMEN ASKED TO
AID, IN ENFORCING EDICT.1

WARNINGS OF SUPER:
IGNORED' BY 1

Even before the outbreak of last I Faculty edicts and

ent and the
bringing it

dope on

football

-eight. And under.
ch seem to point to
old line smashing
ecially in the line,
'eckoned with. The

CONTAINS MUCH OF

INTEREST.I

of beef must be made up in
I endurance. Taken at a
lineup that looks most prob-
weigh a little less than a ton,
rage of 175 1-4 lbs. per man.
.red with past years this is
th'e average but it is not far
to accord with the rules it
more.
avyweight of the squad is
Paterson who tips at 209,
llowed by McHale with 206.
the baby on the scales, try-
est to make 138 which lets
win out by a pound. Taking
ild hazard on the lineup, it
iat the line from end to end
erage about 183 which is
ader the desirable. The av-
ght of the whole squad shows
ble lack of weight, the aver-
early forty men hitting only
owing is the weights of most
e ; whoare on the squad:
169; Clem Quinn, 177; Craig,
et, 169; Paterson, 209; Ponti-

IHuebel, 144;
L74; Dennison,
ter, 177; Wy-
1. Allmending-
Collette, 138;
156; Maurer,
on, 156; Dun-
202; Wilson,
le, 160: Stock,

148

To prove that Michigan has the best
record in athletics of any college in
the west or south, is one of the inter-
esing functions undertaken by What's
What at Michigan, the new campus
publication which goes on sale this
morning. The official records of the
Athletic Association, giving the scores
of all contests in which Michigan.
teams have ever competed, are printed
in full, proving beyond doubt that the
Wolverines have earned practically
the best all-time, all-around athletic
record of any school in the country.
Under the captions of the various
colleges with whom Varsity teams
have competed, are given Michigan's
exact standings with regard to her re-,
spective opponents. These compara-
tive records are exhaustive and devel-
op such interesting information as the
fact that Michigan has it "on" Illinois
and Chicago in both football and base-
ball, as well as in other branches of
sport. Nearly one-half of the 136 pag-
es of What's What is devoted to athlet-
ic "dope," including an all-time Mich-
igan eleven selected expressly for the
publication by Coach Yost.
A special article on the Conference
is included in the athletic section of
the book, together with such features
as the change in football rules for
1912, Varsity football and baseball
captains from 1865 to 1913, and an ex-
planation of the blanket tax regula-
tions. The reviews of the various sea-
sons in sport were written by Loren
Robinson, '13. The cover of the book-
let is in blue and orange with a cut of
the 1912 Varsity football squad in the
center.
While a large part of the contents of
What's What is devoted to athletics,
many other matters of interest to col-
lege people are ' included. Part one
deals with the history and present ad-
ministration of the University, includ-
ing notes and statistics on colleges.
and universities. The third chapter
treats of student affairs, including an
article on the over-organization of the
campus, by Frank Pennell, a digest of
the uniform class constitution, and
statistics on campus organizations,
fraternities and sororities, and coed-
ucation.
On account of a delay in. press work
What's What was not put on sale yes-
terday, but a limited edition will be
ready for today.
Prof. Riggs is in Toledo on Business.
Professor Henry E. Riggs, of the
civil engineering department left Ann
Arbor last night for Toledo, Ohio, on
private business. He will return Sat-

Mass meetings " in University Hall
are a thing of the past. With the open-
ing of the gridiron season, only two
days away, the Athletic Association
decided to do away with the rally in
the big hall that has done duty for so
many years and try a new stunt. It
is planned to have the mass meeting
at Ferry field just before the whistle
is blown in the Case game.
While the details of the new scheme
have not been perfected, the manage-
ment favors the students assembling
about an hour before the contest.
There will be speeches°1nd songs as
well as the yells to instill a little "pep
into rooters before the team comes on
the field. The program has not yet
been completed but it is expected that
'it will be arranged today.
With the new blanket tax, every
student has admittance to the field and
the fact that the meeting is held be-
hindr the gates will bar no one. The
open air mass meeting is ofncourse
rather of an experiment. It will be
tried and if it works with any degree
of success, it will probably be used
during this season. Since the univer-
sity has grown beyond .the seating ca-
pacity of University Hall, a mass meet-
ing in the building has always been a
source of worry to the officials. While
the building is perfectly safe, it is nec-
essary to crowd the exits and aisles if
everyone is °to .be accommodated and
is rather risky. When the new audi-
torium is completed it could be used
for a function of this kind and it may
be that it will be utilized. However,
for the present the authorities deem
it advisable to forge the oldtime pleas-
ures of a rouser in "U" Hall and try
the open air.
FIRST PARTY FOR FRESHMEN
WOMEN WILL BE HELD FRIDAY
The first of the class parties for
freshmen women of all departments
will be held at Barbour gymnasium,
Friday afternoon at four. The pur-
pose of the party is threefold; Mrs.
M. B. Jordan, dean of women will de-
liver a general talk to the women,
elections for the freshmen social com-
mittee wil be made, and the women .of
the various departments will be given
the opportunity of meeting one an-
other. After the business of -the meet-
ing is concluded refreshments and
dancing will figure on the program.
Mrs. Harry B. Hutchins and Mrs. John
R. Effinger will act as chaperons.
NEW COURSE IN ECONOMICS
OMITTED IN LIT BULLETIN.
Course 3 in Political Economy which
was omitted from the literary an-
nouncement by mistake, will be given
by Dr. Carl Parry on Tuesday and
Thursday at 9 o'clock in room 102 of
the economics building.
This course is an exposition, histor-
ical and critical, of the modern social-
ist movement, with special reference
to its economic and sociological doc-
trines and their development. It must
be preceded by course 1.

UNION PLANS TO
BOOST MEMBERSHIP
Nearly a Hundred Men will Campaign
Systematically for New
Members.
CAMPAIGN STARTS NEXT WEEK.
Plans for the annual Michigan Un-
ion house-to-house membership cam-
paign have been practically completed
by General Chairman Maurice Toulme,
'14L, of the membership committee.
For this campaign the city has been
divided into nine districts 'over which
the following nine chairmen will have
supervision; Morton R. Hunter, '13E;
Edward T. Lazear, '13E; J. A. Otto,
'13E; R. C. Spinning, '13; Walter
Staebler,''13; and Henry Cope, 'i3E.
"Cam" Trible, '13, has charge of the
canvass in the fraternities.
The actual campaign will take place
Wednesday and Thursday evenings of
next week. Each, sub-chairman will
have ten men to solicit in his particu-
lar district, and for the purpose of in-
forming all comimtteemen concerning
their duties, a smoker will' be held
the Tuesday evening preceding the
campaign. All members of committees
are expected to be present on this
occasion to receive books and litera-
ture for canvassing.
A meeting of all sub-chairmen of the
membership committee has been called
for Sunday afternoon at the Union at
4 o'clock. It will be necessary that
all sub-chairmen have their committee
members chosen by that time.
Although Michigan Union member-
ship figures have reached a record
high-water mark already this year, it
s hoped that the general canvass plan-
ned by the committee will add four
or five hundred names to the present
enrollment.
WYVERN AIDS DEAN JORDAN
IN PLACING NEW STUDENTS.
About 200 first year women have en-
rolled up to the present time, and
practically all of them have been car-
ed for in the sororities, league, or ap-
proved houses. Dean Myra B. Jordan
has been greatly assisted this year, by
members of the Wyvern, an honorary
junior society, established last year
for the purpose of. assisting the new
women students in all posible ways.

*
*
*
*

the club house. They were
The statement follows:-"The Uni- leaders, whit
versity Senate. has forbidden hazing ally one of
on pain of expulsion and the President scarcely a f
has declared his determination to dis- while the en
cipline any student found violating it out on thre
this decree. Experience in the past verdant trib
has taught that such practices are in- hard. Again
jurious to the welfare pf the univer- through the
sity. older student
"Therefore, in, .b'half of the Michi- the leafy bo
gan Union.W'e urge all students to the "babes."
give heed to the president's wishes and Stand-I
abstain from indulging in any form The scrap
of hazing." North Unive
(Signed) Committee of Board of Di- street. He
rectors. I n h ather.

TO SPEAK HERE.I

Suffrage"

Jane Addams, of Hull House
nent, Chicago, who has lately
nuch in the public eye for her
work in the National Progres-
'arty, will talk on "Woman's
;e" at . the Whitney theatre
sday evening, Oct. 9, at 8
Miss Addams comes here un-
auspices of the local Woman's
;e Society. The lecture will be
o the public and seats may be
d at 25, 15, and 10 cents each.
RAND WILL NOT "PLAY
SATURDAY AT CASE GAME.
band will not make its initial
-ance at the game against Case
ay afternoon. A permanent or-
tion for the year will be made
st of next week, at which time
'or the coming year will be dis-
A large number of old play-
vill be back. It is ex-
"The Victor," will be heard

night, two of the student bodies, the
Michigan Union and the Student Coun-
cil had held meetings to take action
in the matter and lend the support of
the upper classmen in helping the fac-
ulty suppress the inter-class fights.
Both bodies held their meetings yes-
terday and although there was little
time for them to assemble and take
any measures upon last night's affair,.
steps will be taken to prevent a recur-
rence this evening.
The council took a decided stand
against all'° the hazing methods. At
their meeting a resolution was passed
asking the upper classmen to come to
the rescue and help the council and
the faculty. The council stated that
its views coincided in every respect
with the rules laid down and that all
in its power would be done to stop
all demonstrations other than those
permitted by the university officials.
The board of directors of the Michi-
gan Union met last night and added
its weight to the fast-growing senti-
ment against the affairs of the last few
evenings. The action was precipita-
ted when the hostilities started near

warnings went for naug
night. Hazing that deg
roughness at times was
the night program an
were about even for bo
men and second year r
at the Michigan Union
marched up State street
of Liberty without any
save a few yells. But 1
nium broke loose and it
fight.
Upper Classmen out
A crowd of upperclass
the streets to watch the
took no part in the con
share of Ann Arbor col:
ness what turned out to
an interclass fight as h
since the university auth
ban on all hazing.
urge on or prevent it.
of Ann Arbor collected to
turned out to be as m
class fight as has been
university authorities p
all hazing.
As is usual with a con
by a class who received
ing in its'frshman v

UNION UNABLE TO PLACE ALL
STUDENTS ASKING ,FOR WORK
In an effort to secure positions for1
all students desiring work, the employ-
ment committee of the Michigan Un-
ion will canvass the city at once. A
meeting of the committee, of which
Howard Ford, '13, is chairman, has
been called for this afternoon at 5
o'clock at the Union.
Some trouble has been experienced
so far this fall in providing jobs for all
men applying at the Union, but it is
hoped that by a systematic canvass,
all applicants can soon be furnished
with work.
UNION HOLDS OPENING
MEN'S RECEPTION TONIGHT
Open house privileges will be in
order tonight at the Michigan Union,
on the occasion of the opening recep-
tion for all Michigan men. "Eddie"
Saier, '13, will be the chief hand-shak-
er of a large reception committee, and
"Ike" Fischer's orchestra will be on
hand for a return fall engagement.
Members of the faculty have been
invited to be present this evening. The
festivities will begin at 8 o'clock, and
'refreshments will be served later in
the evening. All freshmen will be
made welcome.
Y. 1. C. A. to Have Worker's Meetings.
The University Y. M. C. A. has ar-
ranged a new feature in the associa-
tion work for the year, to be known
as the worker's meeting and luncheon.
These affairs will be held at Newberry
hall every Sunday afternoon, and are
'for the purpose of discussing the asso-
ciation work.

plate glass windows-of the store
fighting hard for possesion of t
gantic shower bath. There was
ly a man that escaped the duckir
many stood for several minute
derneath the torrent of cold
while their captors .shared the sc
to get in on -the fun.
UNION MEMBERSHIP FIGURE:
REACH THE MARK OF
Michigan Union membership. f
went up another peg yesterday,
breaking all records in comp
with corresponding dates for pr
years. The last man to register
Union desk last evening put his
opposite the number 1594, and
with the memberships secured
licitors which have not yet been
tered, will bring the figures tc
well above the 1,600 mark.
Nearly one-fourth of the name
enrolled on the Union lists are
of freshmen, and about one-h
these represent the engineerir
partment, with the literary depar
running a neck-on second.
MANY STUDENTS FIND'WORT
THROUGH UNIVERSITY Y.

spnr

1

'hat's

The employment bure
versity Y M. C. A. has :
392 jobs for students t
interesting feature of
work has been the nu
jobs secured.
Last year the Associa
1100 jobs during the n

Is On

Sale

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