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November 09, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-09

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$2.50

I

The

Michiga

Daily

-AILED TO ANI
ADDRESS $3.00

34.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9,1912.

PRICE

OF QUAKER DATTLE

UPON

THE LINE

L11

an of Both Camps is That
Forwards Must Hold in Order
That Slar Backs Will be
Able to Gain,

the

TO US1 EVERYTHING
IN ORDER TO BEAT

PENN.I

TH E WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday,
fair.
University Observatory - Friday,
7:00 p. in,, temperature, 42.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding
52.6; minimum _ temperature 24 hours
preceding 30.2; average wind velocity
14 miles per hour.

's Will Use Strongest Lineup
nd Will Play Best Game
of Year.
JADELPHIA, PA., Nov. 8.-A

DEAN COOLEY SPEAKS TO LAWS.
Member of Engineering Faculty Pres-
ent for First Time in 31 Years.
The largest crowd that ever attend-
ed a law class smoker was present
last night at the initial smoker of the
junior laws at the Michigan Union.
For the first time in 31 years, a mem-
her of the. engineering department was
present at a session of a law class.
Dean Cooley was one of the chief
speakers of the evening. He empha-
sized the necessity for cooperation be-
tween the engineering and law depart-
ment..
Dean Bates and Professors Aigler,
Bunker, and Goddard of the law de-
partment, also gave short talks, show-
ing the advantage of "mixing" with
other men, especially in the class
smokers.
Some plans for the year's social af-
fatrs were made. It was decided to
have three smokers, at least two danc-
es, and a banquet..
Kentuckians Smoke at Union.
The Kentucky State club held a
smoker last night at the Michigan Un-
ion. It was decided to hold a banquet
on Thanksgiving.
MANY GRADUATES
ELECTED TUESDAY

hLTF EROUtS TIMELY ARTICLES
IN THE NOVEMBER AL1fNUS
The November issue of the Michigan
Alumnus is rue to ap'pear either today
or Monday. Under the general head-
ing of Event and Comment there will
be a discussion of the university ex-
tension lectures, the reunions for 1913,
and the coming Collegiate Alumnae
convention. The Senate memorial to
Prof. H. S. Smalley, and the new mark-
ing system, form the subject matter
for two other items. The table of
contents shows that this issue will al-
so contain a number of articles of gen-
eral interest.
Wilfred B. Shaw, the editor, stated
that about half of last year's graduat-
ing class have already subscribed for
the magazine. This percentage is con-
siderably larger than that obtained
from most of the previous classes.
Few 1'nion Dance Tickets Left.
Tickets for the regular Saturday
iight dance at the Michigan Union this
evening have been selling at a lively
rate. Only a few of the admission
cards remain to be sold and these can
be secured at the Union office.
GIVE UP HOPE FOR
LINDNER'S RECOVERY,

* * * I
To lA V'S

* * * * *
GRIDIRON BATT

-o-
West
Chicago vs. Northwestern.
Wisconsin vs. Arkansas.
Illinois vs Purdue.
M. A. C. vs. Mt. Vernon.
0. S. U. vs. Oberlin.
Notre Dame vs. St. Louis U.
Indiana vs. Iow a.
Case vs. Kenyon.
East.
Michigan vs. Penn.
Yale vs. Brown.
Harvard vs. Vanderbilt.
Cornell vs. Dartmouth.
Prinoeton vs. N. York U.
Army vs. Carlisle.
Navy vs. Bushnell.
Syracuse vs. Lafayette.
* * * * * * * *

* * *
'LES *
*
*
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*
*
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*
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*
*
*
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*
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*
*
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*
* * *

i

STUDENTS F

SUSPEND

D

lJNIVERSI T
Pali Vincent and Marshall Foote
charged From University
for Period of One
Year.
DISORDERLY CONyDUCT AND .
DRUNKENNESS IS CHAR

Action of Faculty Based
Vincent Explainil
Affair.

the

uliar feeling pervades both the
[verines and Quaker camps tonight,
ixed feeling of fear and of confi-
ce. The outcome is a guess to say
least, and rooters of neither side
make definite statements predict-
victory, while the opposing coach-
are strangely reticent. Both teams
e . met defeat, both teams
of more or less unproven ability,
the dope on the outcome is con-
uous by its absence. It's an .even
and no more.
oth camps tonight are making one
ement and harping on one thing.
slogan among the Quakers at their
p and the slogan among the Wol-
nes at Wayne is "It's up to the
" and this concisely expresses the
. To those who have followed both
ns, through their unsatisfactory
ons itrisgclearly thattheir lines
been the cause of their defeats
it must be the line that will win
one team tomorrow. If Michigan's
plays as it should Michigan will
but if the Penn forwards outplay
higan, the Quakers will win the
nth clash. That is the dope in a

Both oackfields, when ranked man
man and as to united playing are
actically even. Mercer and Minds
e the men who will sine in the Penn
cks but despite the reputation of1
se two men Thomson and Craig will
sily equal them. In fact Thomson
considered a better line plunger
an Mercer while if the field is fast
wlg's sprints will par up with Minds
d Mercer's end runs. Harrington
about on a par with either Hughitt
Boyle and Huebel will rank even
th Craig, the Quaker quarter. Penn
s a bit of the edge in having Mar-
al ready to use at any time for drop
:ks and this .saie Marshall is good
the point getting kicks while Mich-
,n lacks a sure toe artist.
But conceding the backfields to be
ual, neither will be able to shine to
y extent without a line that will en-
e them to get their plays away.
rcer this year has not been the Mer-
of last year and the reason is that,
has not the. line that he had last
r. No matter how good a star a
n may be, if his interference is
ken up before he gets to the line
I his line of play is shifted, he will
shine. Thomson's line bucking
' be of no avail if there is not a hole
him. Marshall's drop kicking abil-
will be of no use if his attempts are
cked. Craig's sprints are impossi-
unless he can get past the line of
immage and up to the secondary
ense. So these two star backfields
st depend upon their lines and
rein is the secret of the game.
)n defense again it is the matter of
line. If Mercer and Minds are to
a around the ends they must reach
se extremities with unbroken inter-
ence if they are to evade the Michi-
Z ends. Mercer's line bucks will
go far if the Michigan line is strong
. the same with Thomson if the
in forwards have the edge. Per-
is Pennsy has a bit the best on the
ense proposition as Michigan is
aR on breaking up forward passes#
le the Quakers 'star at this. The
higan secondary defense has not
n able to solve these tosses and
vent big gains and unless they
w a reversal of form tomorrow,
Ln may overcome them by the bas-f
ball route. But after all it is the
nd as to these two line there is ab-
itely no choice. Both sets of for-
ds have not played what they arek

the best in the matter 01
weights but weights are useless un-
less there is a charge behind them.
The Michigan line must play low, it
must be versatile, it must play the
game it is capable of, If it does this
the Wolverines will go home winners.
The Michigan team arrived at
Wayne late Thursday afternoon and
was unable to Fo practice but suc-
ceeded in getting a long signal drill
-today. The workout consisted in the
main of simple plays but after it was
over Yost marshalled his charges into
the hotel where a long quiz was had
and according to rumor the Wolver-
ines expect to pull a number of trick
plays tomorrow. It is known that
Yost boasts of a large number of fool-
ers and he will open everything to de-
feat Penn and then take chances
against Cornell. The Michigan line-
up is not absolutely certain, three
places still to be undecided. With a
view to strengthening the line, Musser
may start the gane at tackle. It was
Musser who raised the commotion at
the Syracuse game -but the coach feels
that he is a scrapper, and realizing the
importance of the line tomorrow he
may use him. Another question is
whether Carpell or Barton will start
at right end. Hitherto Carpell has
been the only one mentioned as he is
by far the best on defense but Barton
overshadows him on defense particu-
larly in the matter of pinching for-
ward passes. So the lanky boy may
be placed there and if he is, it is ex-
pected Michigan will start passes right
on the go, Hughitt and Boyle are still
scrapping for that other half and nei-
ther has received absolute assurance
that he will go in. Dope seems to fa-
vor Hughitt for first chance.
Penn will start their strongest line-
up with all their backfield stars in fine
shape. Despite the bear stories of the
past week, Captain Mercer will start
at full back and Minds at left half
with Craig running the team. Accord-
ing to the Quaker coaches, the team
is in far better shape-than it has been
(Continued on page 4.)
MAY REAY CAALLS
TO PACIFIC COAST

f
Y.
It
:e
s
t
d
11
Pi
s
d
k
,t
s

Michigan Alumni Are to Occupy
merous Important Offices in-
State and Nation,

Nui- Only

YOUNGEST INCUMBENT IS ONLY 22

That Michigan graduates are promi-
nent in the field of politics, was dem-
onstrated by the results of the general
election held on Tuesday.
Probably the most prominent of the
Michigan alumni to be elected to office
was Governor John F. Shafroth of Col-
orado, who was named for United
States Senator. $ Gov. Shafroth was
graduated from the literary depart-
ment in 1875 and has served three
terms in Congress. He was e'lected
for a fourth term but resigned. In
1909 he was elected governor of Col-
orado, which office he holds at the
present time.
Out of 13 United States con-
gressmen elected for the state of Mich-
igan, seven are Michigan graduates.
The names of the congressmen follow.
Samuel W. Beakes, '83, was elected
on the democratic ticket for the see-
on district of Michigan, which includes
Ann Arbor. Mr. Beakes has been. may-
or of Ann Arbor and has also held the
office of postmaster. His opponent,
W. W. Wedemeyer, the present holder
of the seat in Congress to which Mr.
Beakes was elected is also a Michi-
gan alumnus, having been graduated
in '96.
Claude S. Carney, '96L, was elected
on the democratic ticket from the third
Michigan district. Mr. Carney, who is
a resident of Kalamazoo, won by a
substantial majority over his progres-
sive and republican opponents al-
though his county went for Roosevelt.
Carl Mapes, '96L, republican, of,
Grand Rapids, was elected to a seat
for the first time. He represents the
fifth district. Louis C. Crampton, also
of the class of '99, of Lapeer, Michigan,
was elected from the seventh district.
James C. McLaughlin, '83L, of Muske-
gon, will represent the ninth district
in Congress. Samuel W. Smith, '78L,
of Pontiac, was elected in the sixth
district, and Patrick H. Kelly, 'OOL,
was elected Congressman at large
from, the state of Michigan. Mr. Kelly
is now lieutenant governor of the state
under Governor Osborn.'
Among the Michigan graduates elect-
ed as state senators are George S.
Hanley, '04L, of Detroit, and William
C. Grace, '07L, of Kalamazoo.
In Saginaw county, three Michigan
grads participated in the fight for
prosecuting attorney. These men, Carl
C. Rogner, James P. Devereaux and
Bird J. Vincent were all members of
the law class of '05. Vincent was
elected by a majority of 17 votes over
Devereaux his nearest opponent.
Probably the youngest man to be
elected to office of prosecuting attor-
ney in the state of Michigan is Ches-
ter O'Hara, of St. Joseph, a member of
the law class of 1910. He is only'22
years old but received a large majori-
ty over his opponent in the election1
in Berrien county.

DELIRIOUS FOR SEVERAL DAYS.,
Alfred Lindner, '16, who is seriously
ill in the university hospital from an
attack of blood poisoning, is gradual-
ly growing weaker. According to his
physician and nurse, no hope is en-
tertained for his recovery, and it is
only a question of time until the infec-
tion overcomes his strength and death
results. lie was reported as resting
easily late last night.
Since being taken to the hospital
Lindner has been constantly attended
by his father and friends, the former
having been summoned by President
Hutchins when the seriousness 'of the
accident became known. The best of.
care has been given him and every-
thing tliat coid possibly benefit him
has been doe.- The patient has been
delirious for several days, thinking
continually ofathletic contests, es-
pecially of tse i n which he has com-
peted.,
SDSPECIAL
CORNELL GAME HOP
In place of the regular Saturday ev-
ening dance at the Michigan Union on
Nov. 16, a special Cornell {game hop
will be sponsored by'that organization.
The dance will be held in Bgrbour gym
and attendance will be limited to 200
couples. It is expected that a number'
of alumni returning for the big game
will be present at the affair, a block of
tickets being set aside for the old
grads.
"Ike" Fischer's.eight-piece orchestra
will furnish the music and the commit-
tee in charge promises a number of
special features. Dancing will contin-
ue form 9:00 to T2:00.
Tickets for theCornell game and-
dance will go on sale at the Union at
5:00 o'clock next Tuesday afternoon,
and as usual only members of the
Union will be allowed to purchase the
pasteboards.
Arrangements for the dance will be
managed by the following committee:
Bernard Fallon, '13, chairman; Will-
iam Gramley, '14H; H. Beach Carpen-
ter, '14; W. J. Thienes, '14E; and Fred
Van Dolsen, '14L.
COMMITTEE MEETS TO MAKE
A1RRAN(EMENTS FOR SMOKER
The Union smoker committee met
for the first time yesterday to com-
plete plans for the big smoker to be
held on Tuesday evening, Nov. 19.
Committeemen' were instructed as to
their particular duties and arrange-
ments were made for taking care of
the crowds which are expected to at-
tend.

Question of Time Until Blood
Poisoning Takes Fresh-
man's Life.

OLD LEAGUE PRESIDENT%
HAS SERIOUS EYE TRQUV LE.
Miss Josephine Rankin,, foimer
Woman's League president) and active
in women's campus affairs, is suffering
from a serious trouble with one of her
eyes. Miss Rankin is in Chicago, con-
sulting with physicians at present and
is expected back in Ann Arbor for a
few weeks' rest. Shp holds the chair
of history and the social sciences, and
is also dean of women, at Emporia
college, Kansas. She has been grant-
ed a semester's leave of absence,as it
is thought that her eyes may be treat-'
ed so as to enable her to resume her
duties shortly.
PROF. BAILEY IS COMPLETING.
rDET AILS OF NEW SELF-STARTER
Prof. Ben F. Bailey of the depart-
ment of engineering is visiting Grand
Rapids, for the purpose of completing
details in connection with the newK ai-
ley " Electrical Co., which will start
soon manufacturing the Bailey self-
starter- for automobiles.'-
The new starter which was invent-
ed by Prof. Bailey, is much lighter and
more simple than any now on the
market, and is expected to be man-
ufactured in large quantities during
the coming winter.
PUT NEW PATCHES OF PLASTER
ON SECOND FLOOR OF IT. HALL
As a result of the dangerous con-
ditioj of the plaster on the ceil-
ing of the second floor of Univer-
sity- hall, several patches of it were
taken down yesterday and, new plaster
put in. Some of the plaster had worked
loose and it was feared that the vibra-
tion of the building might cause it to
fall in the near future. Although the
patching will remove all immediate
danger the work was only intended
to take care of the situation until the
holidays when the entire ceiling will
be replastered.
MANY STUDENTS ENROLLED
IN Y. M. C. A. BIBLE COURSES
More than 50 students are now en-
rolled in the course in Bible study
conducted by the 'University Y. M. C.
A. They are divided into 8 classes
which meet regularly throughout the
week and on Sunday.
It is planned to have one general
meeting of all the classes at least
once a month, where questions will be
presented by some authority on Bibli-
cal study. Among those who are ex-
pected to appear a're Prof. Schailer-
Matthews and Dr. Browntf Yale.
Work of Observatory Shown in Charts.
The astronomical department, under;
the direction of Prof. R. H. Curtis, is
compiling a series of papers and charts
showing the work of the observatory
during the past few years; Several
articles written by Profs. Hussey, Cur-
tis and Mitchell of that department,
will be printed in connection with
them.1
PROF. TRUEBLOOD RECITES
JULIUS CAESAR TUESDAY.
Prof. T. C. Trueblood of the oratory1
department will give a dramatic re-
cital of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar
next Tuesday evening in University
hall. This will be the third number1
on the Oratorical association's pro-t
gram. The regular membership tick-
ets of the association will be accepted
for admission.

At a meeting of the heads of the lit-
erary ,and engineering departments
yesterday afternoon, it was decided
that Paul E. Vincent, '16E, and Mar-
shall W. Foote, '13-'15L, both of Erie,
Pa., be suspended from the university
for a period of one year.. The charge
on which the suspension was based
'was "drunkenness and disorderly con-
duct on the streets of Ann Arbor."
Both students have been absent from
their classes following an assault,
some weeks -ago, on a local photogra-
pher, in which .bth were alleged ,t
have been implicated. Vincent Wrote
to the faculty of the engineering de-
partment explaining, min part, his con-
nection with the affair, and acknowl-
edging his condition at the time. Nei-
ther student,thowever, appeared before
the faculty to clear himself of suspi-
cion in the case, although summoned
to do so. Accordingly, the action of
the faculty was based entirely on the
admissions in the letter.
The trial of Lawrence C. Nagel also
of Erie, Pa., the visitor whQ was the
only one arrested and charged with
the assault, will , held this morning.
Following a hearing he vas released
on bail and his promise to produe
the other two men wanted for the as-
sault. Nagel was in town last night
but. the two students who were su-
pended are at their homes, as far as
can be learned. It appears that they,
however, are the.most wated, and
that Nagel may be relesed, since it
has developed tIht he acted the part of
peacemaker in the affair.
Arthur Brown, attorney for kfnck-
ley, the man 'who -was assaulted, said
last night that the action of thefaculty
would not change his client's course
in the matter. After the trial this
morning, and the facts are brought
out, he may institute' both civil and
criminal actions against ohose shown
to be involved.
FRESH BRING SEAT
SALE UP._TO 12000
Freshmen took possession of the seat
diagram yesterday and carried away
500 admission to the Cornell game.
This brings the total number of sales
up near the 12,000 markt which far ex-
ceeds the reservations of last year at
this time. From all indications the
record breaking crowd of last year will
be surpassed Nov. 16 unless the weath-
er man has booked a storm for that
date.
There are still many seats scattered
throughout the stands on both the
north and south sides of the field. All
those who have reservations which
they have not called for should get
them at once to enable the association
to start the general sale with a clear
field. There are many ticket holders
who have not procured their blue flags
and these delinquent ones -are urged
to get them at once.
The faculty members who are not
holders of season books may get res-
ervations today on either side in de-
sirable sections which have been set
aside for their selections.
FUNERAL OF JOHN L. DUFFY
HELD YESTERDAY MORNING
The funeral of John L. Duffy, '93L, a
former Michigan football star and
prominent attorney of Ann Arbor, who
died' Thursday after an illness of five

The university wireless station
heard calls for Los Angeles last night
from the new radio stations at Arling-
ton, Va. This is the strongest send-
ing station in America and when it
sueceeds in reaching the far west the
university will be able to communicate
with the Pacific by means of relays
effected through this eastern station.
With messages being received from
Colon, Panama, the local station, with
its small antennae and low capacity
receivers and senders, is .considered
very efficient. The wires here are
only 150 feet high while the new east-
ern station has its antennae strung on
three poles, two of which are over 600
feet high.
After December 13 a federal license
will be required of all wireless sta-
tions and the university has already
received blanks from the government
for this purpose.
Add 200 Books to Engineering Library.
Over 200 of the latest engineering
and other technical books have been
added to the engineering library this

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