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November 07, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-07

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AT YOUR

The

Michigan

Daily

MlAILI

No. 32.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1912.

.,

LEAVES
R' ANNUAL

PENNS Y AME
'higan Varsity Will Face Pennsyl.
vania Without Having Had
Scrimmage Since South
Dakota Game.
ON RIP WITH FIRST T1EAM.
t of Scrubs Who Will Go to Phil-
adelphia Will Be Annonmeed
Tomorrow.
Jhen the Michigan Varsity football
n left last evening on its annual
tern invasion, it was without the
efit of a final workout on Ferry
I. The incessant rain which fell
day yesterday prevented Yost from
ding his Varsity men into action at
and there was not even a signal
1 called.

THE WEATHER MAN
Foreca t for Ann Arbor-Thursday
fair and colder with moderate to brisk
southwest winds.
University Obsernatory-Wednesday,'
7:OQ p. in. temperature 52.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding
63.1; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding 47.9; average wind velocity
7 miles an hour; rainfall .93 inches.
Talks on Rubber Tire -,manufacturing
Dr. A. A. Templeton, vice-president
of the Morgan and Wright Co. of .De-
troit, delivered an address here yester-
day on the subject, "Rubber and the
Manufacture of Rubber Tires." He
prophesied that in the course of a few
years the price of rubber will drop
from its price of $1.00 to about 30
cents a pound.

Campus or Cemetery?
.m I IIIift iAl
IP
j I t II ly f \\ t ' ,
(( hr)U I _______
'I I III i .. -
\ I

PAINTED WINIO1W FOOTBALL
NUMBER TO BE OUT SATURDAY
Lovers of fiction will find that class
of literature treated in a variety of
ways in the football number of "The
Painted Window," which will make its
appearance Saturday afternoon, as it
promises its readers something novel
along the lines of interest and enter-
tainment. Leonard Cline's "View-
point" which is replete with interest-
ing incidents and circumstances is
sure to delight. The frontispiece this
month is by Everett.

SENIORS
BE AD'

FOR

I_

Pres. Hutchins and I
Strongly in Favor
. ilar to That

WILL PROVIDE

lasmuch as the lineup that faced
th Dakota last Saturday and which
xpected to start against Penn on
urday next has not worked togeth-
ni scrimmage drill at any time this
k, Michigan faces the unusual sit-
on of having to go into battle
inst the Quakers without having
scrimmage drill since the Coyote
e. In' other words the regulars
face Penn without having had any
,h work for a week.
a Monday afternoon the work was
t for the first team men and the
en that was lined up against the
rves was composed mostly of sec-
string players. Tuesday there
e only four regulars used in the
mmage. In fact the only practice
the regular lineup, the one Yost
xpected to send against the Red
Blue Players, has had, has been in
.ine of stiff signal drills each even-
is expected, with this in view, that
work Yost will give his men dur-
their two days' stay at Wayne, a
irb of Phliadelphia, where the
is to be quartered until the
ning of the big game, will not be
ight tuning up work usual in such
s, but will consist of stiff drills
will put the Varsity on edge to
the Quakers.
lough Pennsylvania -has been go-
poorly in all games so far, Michi-
is not looking for a walk away
e, though naturally the team will
a with the determination to win
ie eighth meeting of the two big
ms representing the east and the
. Yost will spare no efforts to
ect his play for the big engage-
and if the team goes in minus
roper amount of scrimmage drill,
a sure bet that it will have this
of rough work counterbalanced
(Continued on page 4.)

x
a.
a
s
,
t
a

MUSIC FOR THE
M SC*CORNELL GAME
in Spite of Getting no Trip This Year,
the Band Will Not Go Onx
Strike But Will Play
at Big Game.
BANI) WILL HAVE TO DISSOLVE
IF MONEY IS NOT PROVIDED
Niembers of Baud Believe Association
Should Provide for Their
Welfare.
An impression has been gaining wide
credence on the campus that the band
would. not appear on Ferry field to
play during the Cornell game, because

Toastmasters Initiate Seven Men.
Seven new men were added to the
role of the Toastmasters last night.
After the initiation the new men were
banqueted at the Union. The initiates
were J. S. McElroy, Dion Birney, Mor-
ris Toulme, Harold McGee, Louis
Haller, Edward Thurston, Selden Dick-
enson. The club plans to have a din-
ner every month.
1,000 ROOTERS
GIVE TEAM A
DIG.SEND-OFF
With Whitey Otis Leading Yells, Many
Rooters Stand in Rain and
Give the Varsity
Courage.
SHOOT PISTOLS AND CHEER
AS TRAIN LEAVES STATION.
Only a Few Supporters Leave With
Team but About Forty Have
Bought Tickets.

AT FACU
About 200 Men
Be Nee
0i

WHY NOT TURN ON THE WATER?

UNION MEMBERS
TO DINE TONIGHT
Dr. Angell's Speech and a Skit by the
Mimes Will Be the Main
Features.

NAME COMMITTEES
FOR COMING YEAR
Pres. Lazear of Senior Engineers
Names Many to Conduct
- Class Affairs.

In the future, membe
ior literary class will a
tion with the universit3
advisory board for fres
if the plans now being o
advisory committee ma
At the faculty meetin
ening, the proposal for
was made by the conet
fessors C. O. Davis and
but on account of the sn
the matter was carried
next mneeting which wil
held within the next
Hutchins, Dean Effing
prominent faculty m
strongly in favor of the
several seniors have al
ed their willingness to s
The proposed plan is
now in use at Harvard,
land Stanford where it
highly successful. Bei
of each college year, a:
care to assist in the wor
names to the committ

SOME TICKETS STILL REMAIN. j(NO TOASTMASTER APPOINTED YET

RECEIVE ANSWER
FROM WIRELESS
In receiving an answer by telegram
to a wireless message sent by Dean
M. E. Cooley of the engineering de-
partment to his son, Lieutenant Hollis
Cooley, U. S. N. at Annapolis yester-
day, all doubts as to the efficiency of
tle university wireless station were
dispelled. The message of inquiry as
to whether Lieutenant Cooley would
be present at the Pennsylvania game
was sent over 700 miles to the station
at Washington, D. C., from which it
was relayed to Annapolis.
Atlantic coast steamships have been
communicated with on their way to
Florida and South Carolina, and mes-
sages are frequently relayed by the'
local stations between ships on Lake
Superior and Buffalo. Until recently
the replies that have been received by
the local station from points far dis-
tant were thought to be fictitious, but
the positive proof of the feasibility of
such long distance communication af-
forded by Dean Cooley's successful
message leads the local operators to
believe that the iwplies recently re-
ceived from Key West, Florida, and

of the loss of the trip to Pennsylvania.
Members of the band deny the rumor,
and state that they will play at the
Cornell game.
Although feeling disappointment that
no trip was provided for them this
year, they realize that the sentiment
of the student body, as expressed by
the referendum, is favorable to them
and encourages their effort to preserve
the organization for the present.
Members of the band agree with the
universal opinion of the campus that
if no means are taken to place the or-
ganization on a sound financial footing
immediately, it is a certainty that the
band will undergo dissolution.
"In virtue of the band playing at
athletic functions which is its legiti-
mate field, the athletic association
should provide in some manner for the
band's welfare," declared Manager
Max Stanley, '13, speaking for the
band. "While the band feels keen
disappointment on not being sent to
Pennsylvania this year, the first time
in many years that it was not given
a trip, it will provide music for the
Cornell game.
"If we can be shown that there can'
be something definitely done in the
way of proper maintenance for the
band, and deserved recognition, such
as an annual trip each year as an in-
ducement for our efforts, we will feel
that our work is meeting with appreci-
ation.
"It is not mere conjecture that the
university will lose its band if no pro-
visions are made for its proper main-
tenance. The members of the band
feel strongly that their organization
will not be warranted if they do not
receive support, and definite recogni-
tion."
TICKETS FOR UNION DANCE
GO1 ON SALE THIS AFTERNOON
Tickets will go on sale this after-
noon at 5:00 o'clock for the regular
Saturday evening dance at the Union.
Last week 50 tickets were sold in the
firstt 15 minutes of the sale, and this
record will be more than equalled this
week, it is expected.
Librarian and Mrs. T. W. Koch and
Prof. and Mrs. J. B. Bird, will act as1
chaperons. The committee in charge
of this week's dance is: J. Austin Ot-
to, '13E, chairman; Bruce Bromley,i
'14L, and Maurice Lohman, '14M.

Tickets for the second membership
dinner of the present year at the Mich-
igan Union are selling at a fairly live-
ly rate, and it is expected that 200 men
will greet President-Emeritus James
B. Angell, the principal speaker at this
evening's affair. Although Dr. Angell's
subject has not been announced, it
will doubtless be of especial interest
to Michigan men.
Besides a program of speeches, a
skit presented by the Mimes will be
one of the features of the evening. It
is understood that this stunt will be
in the nature of a burlesque dealing
with The Michigan Daily, and some re-
alistic if not complimentary charac-
terizations are promised.
The remaining tickets for the dinner
are on sale at the desk, the price being
as usual 40 cents. Dinner will be serv-
ed at 6:00 o'clock.

ARMENIANS TO REORGANIZE
THEIR MICHIGAN CHAPTER.
The Michigan chapter of the Arme-,
nian Students' association in America
has been reorganized. The purpose
of this organization is to bring the
Michigan students into close connec-
tion with the general chapter, which
has its headquarters in New York, and
whose purpose is to encourage Arme-
nian students to come to America in-
stead of Europe.
The Armenian students here can get
courses which will be of material help
to their nation, and the fact that they
can work their way through college
further attracts their fellow country-
men to come to .this country. Effort
has been made to boost Midhigan, and
as a result, eight more students came
to Michigan this year.
WOOOROW WIL ON WILL NOT
SPEAK HERE FEBRUARY 22,
Woodrow Wilson will not appear
here on Washington's birthday, as was
expected, owing to the result of the
election. "We do not know who will
be the speaker for Washington's birth-
day as yet," said Dean Bates yester-
day, "but it is certain that Mr. Wilson
will be unable to come."
Dr. Angell Will Speak Before Women.
President-Emeritus James B. Angell
and Asst. Prof. W. A. Frayer will
speak at the Women's League party
Friday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock on
"The Trouble in the Balkans." After
the address there will be dancing in
the gymnasium until six. All league
women are cordially invited to attend.

President Edward T. Lazear has ap-
pointed the different committees that
will guide the destinies of the senior
engineer class for the present year.
Class historian and the toastmaster
for the class banquet will be chosen
at a future date.
The committees follow:
Social-M: Taber, chairman; K. K.'
Hoagg, M. R. Hunter, B. Anderson, C.
Upham, Helen Hamilton.
Cap and Gown--A. H. Kuhn, chair-
man; W. M. Fitzgerald, E. Putnam, N.
Krecke, J. Crane.
Senior Reception-P. G. Brown,
chairman; W. Fiske, H. McGee, N.
lBoice, S. Mills, J. Otte.
Auditing-E. Hancock, chairman;
W. Davidson, S. Hughes, D. Cutler, F.°
Lemper.
Class Day-K. K. Collamore, chair-
man; H. Thrall, A. Sherzer, C. Smith,
C. Jaedeck.
Memorial-L. J. Paddock, chairman;
P. Fletcher, G. Strelinger, L. Flo, J.
Redder.
Senior Sing-E. Howell, chairman;
S. Martinez, B. Ratliff, C. Edward.
Promenade-Bruce Anderson, chair-
man; A. Grove, A. Anderson, B. Wood,
C. Fisher.
Picture--F. Gibbs, chairman; H.
Hieser, R. Tennant, H. Penny, D.
Smith.
Invitation-J. Caldwell, chairman;
T. Warford, J. McLeod, J. Clune, J.
Krause.
Pipe and Stein-F. Lemper, chair-
man; F. Compton, T. Hartung, F.
Densmore.
Banquet-J. Otte, chairman; N. Pre-
ble, W. S. Hopkins, S. Truesdale, H.
Burgess.
Finance-C. W. Thomas, chairman;
R. VanVliet, O. Boston, C. Hoover, K.
Haven.
General Arrangements-L. Holmboe,
chairman; H. Hick, H. Jones, Y.
Chang, O. Steifer.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB PINS
READY FOR DISTRIBUTION.
The new pin of the Michigan chapter
of the Corda Fratres Association Cos-
mopolitan clubs are now ready to be
obtained from the corresponding sec-
retary, W. M. Johnston, 505 E. Lib-
erty street.
The pin is of solid gold and is de-
signed with two hemispheres of the-
world clasping hands, and surrounded
by cornucopia. Above this is the
Michigan shield, and below is the le-
gend "Above all Nations is Humanity."
The wearing of this pin will entitle
the member to the privileges of any
chapter of the organization through-
out the world.

Michigan rooters 1,000 strong, made
their way through last evening's driz-
zle, down the hill to the little green
and white frame building beside the
Ann Arbor railroad tracks.
They had assembled to give their
team a rousing send-off to the biggest
game of the year, and not once did that
primary purpose escape them as they
jostled and pushed each other on the
narrow station platform, and deployed
their numbers over the rails.
From the eminence of a freight car
roof, "Whitey" Otis, never more pep-
pery, with coat and collar off, lead the
loyalists in cheer after cheer and song
after song. Every member of the Var-
sity football squad was given nine
rahs with his name tacked on the end.
Many times the followers of "Whitey"
yelled with the full capacity of their
lungs for the team, Coach Yost aiid
Captain Thomson.
The train pulled in a little after 7:30
o'clock, stopping only long enough to
unload its local passengers, and take
on board the chosen men of Yost.
Amidst the crackling of revolvers, the
now disorganized cheers, and good-
wishes for the team, the engineer pull-
ed open his throttle a notch, starting
Michigan's team on its 24 hour's jour-
ney to Franklin field where the con-
test with Pennsy will take place.
Only a handful of supporters ac-
companied the team, but over forty
have purchased their transportation
to Philadelphia and will leave today..
Grad Obtains Government Position.
Henry S. Rawdon, '12E, left yester-
day for Washington, D. C., where he
has accepted an appointment in the
government service. The position
which is in the Bureau of Standards as
metallographist is rarely obtained by
a recent graduate. While in college,'
'Mr. Rawdon was elected to both the
Sigma Xi and Tau Beta Pi honorary
fraternities.
Prof. Case to Lecture Tonight.
Prof. E. C. Case of the geological de-
partment will give a lecture' this ev-
ening at 7:00 o'clock in the Russell
seminary room of the museum. His
subject will be the "Permian and Tri-
asic Red Beds of Texas, Oklahoma,
and New Mexico." Last summer Prof.
Case traveled through that part of the
country for the Carnegie Institute and
discovered a bed of animal bones 25
million years old. The public is cordi-
ally invited to attend.

WOMEN WA
TICKETSI

The weather man either fc
etiquette yesterday or desired
ate the women of the univer
the ranks of equal rights wh
were given by the voters Tuei
day the porch of the athletic o
crowded to its full capacity w:
nine devotees of football tryin
cape the drizzling rain which
all day. Regardless of the d
spoiling hats, over 600 women
seats for the Cornell game.
The faculty members holdin
ic books also received' their a
of pasteboards yesterday. A
left the allurement of class r(
laboratory to share the fate
women in waiting in the rain
the second year men will be
while the youngsters of the ui
will be accommodated tomorr
Prof. Aigler to Speak to We
"Experience of a- Young I
will be the subject of an adc
Prof. Ralph Aigler, of the law
wment before the Webster soci
day evening. All members of
department are cordially invit
present at the meeting, which
include on its program the fo
"Our Society," F. M. Murph
Successful Lawyer," A. F. Ott
Solo, J. W. Fowler. The mee
be held in the rooms of the
society in the law building a'

With their ardor not a wvhit dampen- all
ed by the inclemency of the weather, Al

the work here.
As the freshmei
signed to their s
requested to see t
two. It is found
a much better poi
year men about cc
toms and minor n
ulty members. It
proper advice fro
the opening of co:
toward preventing
If the proposit
approval of the
meeting, it will p
on a small scale I
cessful will be 1
next fall.

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