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November 06, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-06

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AT YOUR
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IAILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

- I - M

No. 31.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1912.

tI

PRICE FIVE

T

IY LINE
TES WEAK

With Only Four Regulars Working
Against Them the Reserves
Manage to Score Once
Against Varsity.
.CRAG, PATERSON AND BOYLE
ARE STILL ON HOSPITAL LIST
Team Leaves for Philadelphia From
Ann Arbor Station at 7:30
O'clock Tonight.
The ozone in the vicinity of Ferry
field assumed a crackling, bluish, tint
yesterday afternoon during the daily
tflt between the make-shift Varsity
lineup and scrubs, and the voices of
the coaches rumbled, boomed, and
roared in an endeavor to instill fight
into the combatants. With only three
of the regulars in the line dur-
ing the scrimmage, the reserves had
things their own way until Thomson
was sent in late in the fray, turning
the tide of battle to some extent. Tor
bet,'Cole and Quinn, and later, Thom-
son, were the regulars who took part,
and the appearance of new faces in the
Varsity line is an indication that Yost
has not yet completed the choice of
men for the front row.
With the Penn contest three days off,
and no scrimmage for the regular
squad since the South Dakota game,
the showing of the Varsity squad such
as it is, Is anything but promising.
Just what the showing would be with
'the lineup that faced South Dakota is
another matter, as three or four regu-
lars cannot put up the fight that eleven
can.
$trength of Quakers is Not Known.
Penns-s strength is an unknown
quantity, as the reports that have per-
colated through to Ferry field from the
far distant section of the Keystone
state must be taken and weighed like
grains of strychnine. They may have
had an unsuccessful season so far and
Capt. Mercer may not be up to his old
time form but such rumors, for they
amount to nothing else, cannot affect
preparations for a contest that has
ever and always been one to the death.
Michigan's success in last Satur-
day's game should put at ease the
fears of the timorous as to the out-
come of the coning bout with the
Easterners, as it is doubtful if the
Varsity will have to face another elev-
en like the one from the Vermillion
camp this year. But te unexpected is
what happens in many cases, and it is
safe to assume that Saturday's game
will be either Michigan's or Pennsy's
Until the last whistle.
Varsity Scores Twice on Reserves.
In the scrimmage yesterday after-
noon, in which only four of the first
string took part, the varsity scored
twice on the scrubs and their own goal
line was crossed once. Jimmy Craig is
still feeling his ankle and failed to
take part in the mixup as did Paterson
and Boyle and the other cripples, but
Thomson relieved Quinn, who started
at full, before the scrimmage ended.
In the secret signal practice which
followed the scrub contest, an entirely
different lineup presented itself, and
was composed of the players who wer
in at the finish of the South Dakota
game, with the exception of Allmen-
dinger who did not put in his appear-
ance on the field.. Musser played his
position at right guard while Quinn
took up his own place at left and re-
linquished the full back job to Thom-
son. The rest of the lineup for signal
Continued on page 4.)
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ELECT
ROOSEVELT IN STRAW BALLOT.
In the straw vote held by the Ann
Arbor high school yesterday Roosevelt
received 348 out of 672 votes cast, Wil-
son 265, Taft 51, Debs 5. Woman suff-

rage carried by a vote of 475 to 197.
Out of the;whole number of students
voting, 190 voted straight tickets.
The students were given ballots
which were duplicates of those used at
the city polls, and were fully instruct-
ed in the correct way of marking either

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Unsettled
Wednesday, with local rains; rising
temperature.
University Observatory--Tuesday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 52.1; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding
57.8; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 38.1; precipitation, .03 inch-
es; average wind velocity 8 miles per
hour. -
Prof. Meader Again Holds Recitations"
Prof. C. L. Meader of the Latin de-
partment, who was unable to meet his
classes on Monday because of a severe
cold, has recovered and is holding his
usual recitations.
SAILOR BOYS MAY
CHEERFOR TEAM
Negotiations With Secretary of War
3fay Result in Battleship's
Crew being at Game.
SPACE IS RESERVED FOR THE.
Providing permission can be obtain-
ed from the Secretary of the Navy the
crew of the battleship Michigan will be
on hand this Saturday to cheer the
Yellow and Blue on to victory.
Last night a telegram was sent to
the Secretary of the Navy as follows:
'If consistent with public service the
University of Michigan, particularly
its 30,000 alumni, would great-
ly appreciate having the battle-
ship Michigan at Philadelphia so that
the crew could participate in the foot-
ball game between Michigan and Penn-
sylvania next Saturday, Nov. 9. The
attendance of the Michigan crew in
1909 excited country-wide interest."
(Signed) H. B. HUTCHINS,
President.
M. E. COOLEY,
Dean Dept. of Engineering.
This step was taken as the result of
an urgent appeal to Dean M. E. Cooley
by C. R. Hall, of the University of
Michigan club, of Philadelphia. In his
letter to Dean Cooley Mr. Hall says,
"We have reserved a section of seats in
which we would gladly give space to
the crew of the Michigan."
The aid which the sailor boys gave
to the Michigan cheering section two
years ago, as well as the beautiful flag
which they presented to our team, will
be remembered.
Initial Meeting of Y.M.C.A. is Success.
According to the university Y. M:
C. A. leaders, the first monthly meeting
of the term was a success.- The pro-
gram included a sword dance and fenc-
ing match. Next month's entertain-
ment will be in the hands of the Japa-
nese students, and following that will
be a program arranged by some of the
Chinese members of the university.
LIBRARY SOON TO ACQUIRE
COLLECTIONS OF CLASSICS
The general library of the universi-
ty is to receive in the near future two
collections, each of about 750 volumes.
The first of these is donated by the
heirs of Prof. Elisha Jones, who taught
Greek and Latin here from 1870 to
1888. This collection is known as the
Carlyle library, from the fact that it
contains over 200 volumes written by
and relating to Thomas Carlyle. The
balance consists of valuable classics.
The other books come from Dr. Sam-

uel A. Jones, once dean of -the homeo-
pathic department, who died in Ann
Arbor March 9. This library is valu-
ed at $900, and negotiations for its
purchase are already under way.
FRESH ATHLETE SERIOUSLY
ILL WITH BLOOD POISONING
Alfred F. Lindner, '16, who won a
place on the fresh relay team, is seri-
ously ill with blood poisoning at t.ie
university hospital. The illness result-
ed from a slight wound incurred by
cross country running, and has devel-
oped rapidly, becoming so serious that-
his parents have been surmmoned.

iOO1ROW WILSON WILL BE
PRESIDENT OF UNITED STATES

LAT EST RETITR NS SHOW THAT RO OSEVELT IS
ACE FOR SE CONI PLA1CE.

LEADING TAFT IN

(Detroit News Service.)
With the votes piling in from the doubtful states in favor of Wilson, the
election of the New Jersey governor s eems assured.. The returns are as yet
very incomplete, but there are only a few states where Roosevelt and Taft
have had majorities. Roosevelt leads in Michigan, Illinois, and possibly
Pennsylvania, while the only states co needed to Taft are Ohio, Vermont and
Rhode Island. Ferris, the Democratic nominee for governor, leads Mussel-
man by a small majority, and woman s uffrage, reported at first as defeated
by a heavy negative vote, is thought now to be carrying it, this state.
Taft's strength seems to lie in the east, while Roosevelt is running the
stronger in the central and western states.
A late report states that Roosevelt and Taft have telegraphed congrat-
ulations to Governor Wilson.

VITLCANS OPEN RANKS TO
RECEIVE TEN NEW MEMBERS
Ten senior engineers were led last
night through the fiery pits of the
earth to the great god Vulcan's strong-
hold, and there made acquainted with
the manifold secrets of the Vulcan so-
ciety. After the initiation a banquet
was held at the Union, at which time
Dean M. E. Cooley, Profs. H. C. Ander-
son, C. J. Tilden, and S. J. Zowski,
responded to toasts, and "Art" Grove
spoke in behalf of the apprentices.
The following men were initiatel:
'Ted" Baier, "Proc" Brown, "Art"
Grove, "Walt" Schuett, "Wy" William-'
son, "Mort' Hunter, "Bart" Wood,
"Jinks" Otto, "C" Smith, and "Larry"
Holmboe.
FEAR FOR SAFETY
OF PROFIJURIALLEN
Threats of Massacre of All Christians
by Turks Make. His Position
Dangerous.
NO STUDENTS LEAVE FOR EAST.
Grave fears are being expressed for
the life of Prof. John R. Alen, head
of the mechanical engineering depart-
ment, who is now in Constantinople,
Turkey, aiding in the constr ttion of
Roberts College. No word has been
received from him since the Balkan
war began and from the fact that
the newspaper reports state that every
Turk in Constantinople has taken vow1
to kill every Christian in the capital,
the situation has become serious.
"There is great danger that the rol-
licking soldiers will massacre the
Christians in Constantinople," said{
Prof. J. P. Bird, secretary of the engi-
neering department. "Prof. Allen is
in danger even though Rob-
erts College is situated five miles from
-the city on a fortified hill. The sol-
diers will do anything to kill the Chris-
tians and we sincerely hope that Rob-
erts College will not be attacked."
"As no word has been received fromf
Prof. Allen since the war began we are
of course very anxious about him," de-
clared W. H. Tinker last night, "The
situation is mighty serious and all
Christians in Constantinople are in
danger of being massacred by the sol-
diers. Roberts College is protected by'1
the authorities of the city but if the
soldiers attacked it, it would be help-
less."
One Armenian, Z. Kaskasian, arrived
from Turkey last Sunday to take up
work in the medical department. He
left before the present war commenod
but says that the massacre of the Ar-
menians by the Turks are sure to3
come, and are now being carried on,
on a small scale.
So far none from the university have
signified their intention of going to
the war in the capacity of surgeons.,
but it is expected that some will leave
soon.
TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION TO
HOLD MEETING IN ANN ARBOR
Tie MichiganState Teachers' asso-
ciation will -hold its next meeting in
Ann Arbor, if sufficient accomodations
can be found for 7,000 members. At
its recent meeting in Grand Rapids the
advantages of Hill Memorial hall as a
gathering place together with other
advantages naturally coming from
meeting in a university town were fa-
vorably regarded. If it were not for,
the problem of finding rooms for its
members, the association would have

agreed on this place at once.
SENIOR LITS TO M1EET SOPH
'ENGINEERS IN SEMI-FINALS.
The senior lits will battle against
the soph engineers in the second game
of the semi-finals this afternoon at
4:05 o'clock on Ferry field. The win-
ner of this conflict will play the senior
laws Saturday morning for the cam-
pus championship. The sophs will be
slightly outweighed but as they have
overcome this handicap with the teams
of their own department, it looks as
if both teams would rely today almost
entirely upon speed artists in the back-
field.

UNION OFFERS
CASH' PRIZES
FOR CARTOUN81
Three Prizes will be Awarded Student
Submitting Best Cartoons for
Use at Annual Football
Smoker.
PROMINENT SPEAKERS WILL
BE SECURED FOR BIG EVEN'I
Governor Osborn and Edmund C
Shields May be Among the
Speakers.
Following the precedent set las
year, prizes will be given by the Mich
igan Union for the three best cartoon
submitted for use at the annual foot
ball smoker to be held Nov. 19. A
students will be eligible to compete
and a great range of topics may be e-
ployed. Contributions must be hand
ed in at 'thle Union by 5:00 o'cloc
Friday, Nov. 15.
On account of the nture of the af
fair, it is expected that most of the car
toons will deal with subjects connecte
with football. The first prize is $5.0(%
the second $3.00 and the third $1.0(
As usual "Lyndy" will preside at th
lantern, and 15 or 20 of the cartoon
will be projected on the screen during
the evening.
At a meeting of the chairmen of th
committee in charge of the smoke
held yesterday afternoon at the. Unior
the matter of speakers for the bi
event was considered. It is probabl
that Judge Sadler, '98L, of Chicagc
will be present as one of the prncpa
speakers, and it is also hoped to secur
Stratton D. Brooks, '96, former super
intendent of schools in Buffalo an
now president of the University of Oh
lahoma.
Shields May be Here.
Edmund C. Shields, '96L, chairma
of the Michigan state Democratic com
mittee, is another man whom it is hop
ed will be able to attend. A telegram
was received yesterday from Earl D
Babst, '94L, president of the Alumn
association, stating that he would b'
unable to speak at the smoker, on ac
count of a conflicting engagement. Ac
cording to present indications, Govern
or Chase S. Osborn will be here fo
the affair.
The matter of a student speaker fo
the smoker has not yet been settled
It is probable that. "Sully" Sullivan
premier yell-master of former years
will be on the program, and as usua
a member of the faculty will speak.
At the meeting yesterday a nove
plan for distributing the "smokes" fo
this year's rally was devised. A seie
of "lanes'" will be bult through th
doors between the two gyms, and a
the men pass into Waterman gym the
will be "given their pipes and tobacc
Cigarettes will. be distributed at th
main entrance to Barbour gym.
A meeting of all members of commit
tees for the smoker has been calle
for Friday afternoon at 5:00 o'clock a
the Union.

ELECTION RETURNS
FLASHED BY DAILYi
Through Student Ingenuity Daily is
Able to Spread News of Wil-
son's Victory.
POWERFUL ARC L GHT is USED.
Win with Wilson!
Through the ingenuity of four senior
engineers, The Michigan Daily was
able to flash the result of the most
spectacular campaign which has tak-
.en place in many years.
The Michigan Daily had secured a
search-light from Detroit which was
supposed to be extremely powerful,
but when it was connected with an
acetylene tank it failed. Plans for
flashing the returns had nearly been
given up when four senior engineers,
1. E. Lattimer, Don Daron, Stanley
Mills and H. E. Keeler appeared at the
offices and offered their services. They
finally rigged up a powerful electric
arc search-LigLt which enabled The
Michigan Daily to inform Ann Arbor
and its vicinity of the election of Gov-
ernor Wilson as Ipresident of the
United States, by means of a vertical
shaft of light, as previously promised.
The flash could be seen for at least

DR. ANGELL TO BE
AT UNION DINNER

Students Wishing to Attend
Membership Function May
Purchase Tickets.
"MIMES" WILL PRESENT

Second
Still
SKIT.

President-Emeritus James B. Angell
will be the principal speaker of the ev-
ening at the second Union membership
dinner of the year tomorrow evening.
George Burgess, '13L, will preside. as
toastmaster and "Howdy" Wilson, '13,
will be the student speaker. The Mim-
es will also be on the program with
an original skit.
As usual, only 200 tickets will be is=
sued for the dinner. - These may be ob-
tained at the Union, or from members
of the committee in charge. At the
last membership dinner it was neces-
sary to refuse admission to a large
number, so all men expecting to attend
tomorrow night's affair are urged to
buy their tickets at once.
Fresh Medic Committees Appointed.
Fresh medic committees have been
appointed by Pres. Edgar Beardslee as
follows: social committee, W. T.
Vaughan, chairman, C. W. Eberbach,
F. H. Harrison, J. G. Wilmore, and G.
V. Lynch; auditing committee, C. J.
Addison, chairman, W. F. Watton, and

"DAILY ILLII"

Progressive Club Criticises Partiso
Attitude of the Paper.
The Daily Illini, the student public
tion at the University of Illinois, h,
been severely criticised for taking
partisan attitude in the present polit
cal campaign. The paper actively su
ported Congressman William B. M
Kinley.
The criticism came chiefly from t
Roosevelt-Johnson Progressive club
Champaign county, consisting of pror
inent business and professional m
of the cities of Urbana and Champaig
and many citizens scattered thlroug
out the county. Strong resolutio
were adopted in which the action
the managers of the Daily Illini, t
faculty board of control, and partic
larly the censor, Dean T. A. Clai
were severely condemned.
The resolution further gives the id
that the action has already resulted
considerable injury to the univers
in "The Illini's" departure from I
long continued policy of non-par

ten miles around the surrounding
country, the search-light being as pow-.
erful as any in use on the great lakes
at the present time.

H. F. Kenny; financial committee, L. B.
Kingery, chairman, H. W. Shutter and
the president, vice-president and treas-
urer.

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