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November 02, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-02

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Mic__n

Daily

I MAILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NO EMBER 2, 1912.

PRICE FIVE' CENTS

1* * * * * * * * * *, *

t

TODAY WITH

DAKOTA SQUAD
THE WEATHERMAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Fair, and
colder.
University Observatory -Friday,

(d)ES FOR TODAY.
-
West:
U. of S. D. vs. U. of M. at Ann
Arbor.
U. of Chicago vs. U. of Wis. at
Madison.
U. of Illinois vs. U. of Minn. at
Minneapolis.
Northwestern vs. Purdue at Ev-
anston.
M. A. C. vs. Ohio Wes. at Lai-
sing.
Case vsi Ohio State at Cleveand.
East.
Yale vs. Colgate at New H{a\e (I
Harvard. vs. Princeton at t'a-
bridge.
Cornell vs. Williams at Ithaca.
Syracuse vs. Rochester at ,yr-
cuse.
Army vs. Holy Cross at West
Point.
Penn State vs. U. of Penn, at
Philadelphia.
Navy vs. Western Res, at Annap-

* UXION hANCE TTC4(ETM ARE
* ALL SOLD OUT IN TWO O01RS
* Tihe entire issue of tickets for to-
* nights dance at the Michigan Union
* was disposed of within two hours
* Thursday evening. During the first
: 15 minutes of the sale,. an average of
nurly four tickets per minute was
* p as.aed over the counter, and by 7:00
o'lock it was necessary to post the
* " 0 I. 0." sign. The committee in
*car'e wishes it understood that pos-
* itiiy no more admissions will be
* sol at the door.,
Those in charge of this week's dance
are: Harold Williamson, '13E, chair-
m : llrute Bromley, '15L, and George
* K~inston, 14L. The chaperones will
- : Dean and Mrs. Hinsdale and Pro-
, M rjd Mrs. Brumm.
* l'arestry grad Leaves for China.
*4 Muiu 0. Glass, '12, of the forestry
* ue: an.t i leaves Ann Arbor this
)r tor San 'Franncison froi

CAMPUS TO DECIDE BAND'S
FATE BY REFERENDUM VOTE

START
AT TACKLE

ate Yester- 7:00 p. in., temperature 32.1; maximum

No

question in the
an rooters today,
I be settled only
er's whistle puts
ame. It will not
estion of whether
whether the dis-
h that lost at Syr-
has been remod-
nated. Today is
mtire season, the
rear, and the per-
. today will prove
vhether Michigan
win from Pennsy

temperature 24 hours preceding, 32.1;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 31,8; rainfall 1 inch; average,
wind velocity 15 miles per hour.
NEED USHERS TO
ACT AT.BGAM

' I think the expense of sending *
* the band on its annual trip *
* should be borne by student sub- *
* scription. *
"I think the el~es of sendlin; *
* the hbaod on annual trip *
* should. be bo e by the athletic
* association., *
"" *
ALL-FRESH.PLAY
FARMERS TODAY
Yearling Lineup 111Will Probably be the
Same as in Last Satur-
FRESHMEN NOW 11SOW 'P WELL.1

oils.
Amherst
over.
* * *

vs. Dartmouth at Fait-
* * * * * *

,.
,.
.;
,
:;. ,

UIOR lc-u, II
whore he will sail November 9 for
ag lKong, China to enter the service
at Y Stauard Oil Co., of New York
('Py in tbor Asiatic export depart-=

At Meeting Last Night Student Cohn-
cil Provided for General Cam-
pus Poll to Sound Stu-
dent Sentiment.
BALLOT NG WILL BE HELD
)17ND1AY MORNING, 8:00 TO 12:00
Ballot Boxes to be Placed in Main
Buildings; Councilmen to
Hiave Charge.
After a prolonged and heated ses-
sion in which the referendum was dis-
cussed in its several phases, the stu-
dent council went on record last night
by deciding to submit the'question as
to whether the student body or the
athletic association should bear the ex-
penses of the band on its annual trip.
The balloting will be held Monday
morning iht the main building of the
several departments, and the polls will
be open from 8:00 until.12:00 o'clock.
Members of the council will super-
vise the voting in the departments
which they represent, and previous to
the opening of the polls, they will en-
deavor to arouse the students of their
several departments to the importance
of the issue at stake.
A committee consisting of R. L. May-
all, J. L. Crane and D. K. Rtheinhart,
will have general charge of the ballot-
ing.
The athletic association, according
to a report introduced at the session,
defended itselfby stating that it could
not afford to bear the expense of send-
Continued on page 4.)

Athletic Association 'Will Pay
Hundred Men O Cents to
Work for an Hour.

Two

SHOULD APPLY AT ASSOCIATION.

SAYS SPHERE

From one hundred and fifty to two. Ur V111
wn quantity,
Minnesota, hundred students are wanted by the
higan, and athletic association to act as ushers at N
on this one the Cornell game two weeks from to-
Michigan, a day and, contrary to the usual custom,
'illiant pros- these men will be paid for their work.
of material, There are many jobs as ushers, ticket President Hutchins Warns 16 o en
game, that takers, gatemen, etc., to be filled and Against Becoming too Absorbed its
ential point. fifty cents is offered for the work done Outside Things; Declares Tre.
d whether it for an hour or so. All men who are Will Oret Rights.
4.) desirous of securing one of the jobs_
are requested to leave their names at SPEAKS TO WOMEN'S LEAGI.I
~~ the athletic office. These in21 will A T Y~f"T A? FRIhM Y EW1TINt'
t e a h e i ofi e T h s m %lJlR be req u ired to tu rn in th eir slY Xi
ticket for 'the game and will i". ' _i',n .Ie: &nud . 'k ;
AME in return a special usher's ticket 1Yh R e A s.
will admit them to their sectio. ebi
A great many seniors and r
- have already taken the opportui If u rne awa Pa
ay of enter- leaving their names in order to La
f a football tickets reserved for them wh' Jh>
today when go home to vote. Men who d t
s will battle i reserve tickets can secure both elir

I
j
E
{
ki
i
Y '
" i
{
}

El JOGAN' GRAD
TO EAVE FR
TUSHWAR
' Grahedlan, 093, i ratified O-ier
0xpresion Uttered by Mich-
igan Students About
lailkan Situation.
R .1 1 O RE SERIO US TH AN '
AVE 1%E ANI!CAN REALIZES

3 the w
halfs o
oduced
lV Teams

The unique feature own rooting section seats and also
rried out by trainer seats in other sections by leaving their
s giving football en- names and the number of of tickets.
attraction, will be they desire. Those who leave their
d line on Michigan names are requested to call for their
tickets by Thursday night. All others
to predict the out- who have not left their names and who
ace, since all dope intend to go home to vote are asked
d evaporated at the to do so today.
y, but at present it-___ _____
miors would be the, ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
flag across the tape. CHANGES ITS CONSTITUT . ON
ne with such a team
;h, Baier, and Cohn Abolish Departmental Contests and
will not win-but' Adopt New Methods for
ill happen at times. Preliminaries.
artists are no slow
h Carver, Jansen, A new constitution was adopted by
ner the third year the Oratorical Association Thursday
contenders. evening, and W. W. Schroeder, '14, was
e two underclasses eleceted vi e-president of the orgahi-

by their showing this
f the men have been'
der Varsity training.
sophomores are mak-
as to the abilities of
hn, Haiimmill, Shear,
f whom ran fast
outs. The freshmen,
phenom. in Smith to1
st year wonder won
ay in 52.3, tying the
pt. Haff.
records, trial heat
reputations are even-
d to insure a close
nen circle the track
pirit and fight.
part in the race re-
ager Denison at 2:15
or of the field house
nd receive side line

' Thenprincipal changes incorporated
in the new instrument are the methods
of holding the preliminaries of the
Northern Oratorical League and the
peace contests. The departmental
contests have been abolished. In their
place three preliminaries are held, one
including the seniors of all depart-
ments;another, the juniors of the cam-
pus; and the third, the sophomore
classes and the first year laws.
According to the new scheme five
men instead of eight will qualify for
the finals, two from each of the upper
classes and one from the sophomores.
Another provision adopted was the
prohibition of the use of an oration
used in the peace contest,or the North-
ern League contest. The other chang-
es were formal, or of minor impor-
tance.

die psi men it L eas cu d . . Ji _. ,.. ,, "t;
member, however, that enlarged rights
and extended opportunities bring
grave responsibilities which they must
be large enough to meet. Women
should not become absorbed in outside
questions. Do not forget that woman's
sphere is the home. Through its medi-
um the educated college women attain
their most reaching and effective influ-
ence."
President Hutchins complimented
the Women's league upon its remark-
able increase in membership this year
which is partly accounted for by the
350 new freshman women here, and
spoke upon the advance women have
made in educational, professional and
public work during the last fifty years.
Following the president's address,
Agnes Parks told briefly of her work
in raising funds for the new residence
halls for the women at Michigan
There is already $19,000 in this fund
and it is expected that this will be in-
creased by other thousands before the
end of the year. Win.ifred Mahon wel-
comed the women and said that one
thing about the league made it most
unique, it being the largest woman's
club in the state. Miss Fandira Crock-
er also spoke to the meeting and told
something of the coming convention
of Collegiate Alumnae.
Kalamazoo Club Holds Smoker.
The Kalamazoo club will hold its
first smoker tonight at 7:30 o'clock at
the Michigan Union. The purpose of
this meeting is to adopt a constitution
and elect officers. There are about
thirty-five members in the club.

-~\ n n- t-t aroused
:ii'' U t '-o.ofthe unive-s V
. wo XO the most
a ks u ltral and one
na uart zoon der Gar-
abedian, '09M, have been in the city
looking over the situation. The latter
expects to leave for the scene of ac-,
tion in the near future, accompanied
by Andrew Joinnides and Dr. Perry,
the other two men. Dr. Perry is a
professor in the university of Athens.
"Ais a graduate of Michigan I am
most gratified over'*the evxpression
taken by the university students rela-
tive to the Balkan trouble," said Dr.
Garabedian, "The war is far more se-
rious than realized by the average
American student. The fact that Con-
stantinople is now in dange'r of being
attacked by the victorious Bulgarians
may lead both Russia and Austria to
get into the fight. This would mean
that the war would last much longer
than is now anticipated."
"In the last few days about 30 Bul-
garians and 300 Greeks in Detroit
have left this country for the war and
a similar number are contemplating
departure. Interest has become in-
tense among the foreigners in Detroit
and the fact that the Michigan stu-
dents are keenly interested in the con-
flict has caused them to be aroused.
Nearly 30,000 Bulgarians and Greeks
-have so far left this country, showing
that they are excited over the situa-
tion."
All of the missionary societies of
Detroit have formulated resolutions
condemning the atrocities dommitted
by the Turks upon the Armenians and
the Christians in European Turkey.
Most of the literary societies on the
campus have taken for discussion the
Balkan situation.

While the Varsity is tackling the
husky South Dakota ag:;re ation,
Michigan's All-Fresh will be fighting
for the Maize and BIlue at Lansing in
the annual tussle with the M. A, C.
youngsters. This wvill be the fourth
game for the green tcam and they are
out to make their break into the col-
umn while the Aggies are primed for
the contest and plan to get revenge
for thc he liine h an eda utyv 1 th
ver s n 1'y. Them enhveed whO wn '
much abeteron p-cice this werin th
atn ktime seasnand hf en
from the lineup that so nearly won the
game last Saturday with 'Detroit Uni-
versity. The men have been showing
much better i practice this week than
at any time this season and he feels
that the combination is good enough,
to come out right in the tussle today.
The tyoung Farmers are not to be
despised however as they hae been
trouncing tihe Aggie Varsity all this
week and any one who has followed
the work of the up staters knows what
kind of a team Mackiln has turned
out this fall.
Thefollowing is the probable lineup
for the Michigan All-Fresh: Davis,
left end; Benton, left tackle; Ray-
mond, L. G.; Cochran,mCenter; Dpr-
rance, R. G.; Norton, R. T.; Dilinan,
R. E.; -Hunt or Coliette, quarter;
Rhcem, Ls H.; Diehl, full;' Gault ind
Smith, R. H.lw ft i
VGRAI)UATES T.0 ROLl) FIRST
SOCIAL OF YE AR TONIOHL.,
The first of four parties to be given
by the graduate club this year will be
held tonight at Barbour gym. There
will be a short program including an
address- by Prof. Guthe, dean of the
graduate school, followed later in the
evening by Halloween festivities and
dancing. Invitations have been sent
to the two hundred members of the
graduate school and a large attend-
ance is expected. The work of th2 club
promises 'to be of exceptional interest
this year because of the increase in
membership of the school and its new
organization. The party will be helda
at 7:30 o'clock.

I t'P ndred rntuusiaejt r-ooters
iaaned their voices at the~ M\icbigan
Soa last eenIng for the game with
Sou D bakotalthis vfternoon. Michi-
gan songs and yells, young and old,
were practiced in a most gratifying
manner. Printed folders, which con-
tained the songs, were passed through
the crowd.
It had been the idea of the Union
management to conduct an all Michi-
gan sing rather than a mass meeting,
and President Edward G. Kemp made
an announcement to thateffect. The
U'nion addition was-'packed with stu-
dents, the majority of whom were
freshmen, an~d the loud cheers-were al-
most deafening with old style ginger.
The lack of the usual mass meetings
before the home games, this year, has
been felt among the student body, and
last evening's. program helped greatly
to fill the gap. "Cam" Trible sang
himself hoarse leading the songs, and
"Whitey" Otis found the floor of the
.stage almost too slippery for a "siren."
An announcement was made that
plans were under way to hold a mam-
moth mass meeting in the gymnasium
on Friday evening before the Cornell
game.
GIFT OF $a00' RECEIVED BY'
GAS EXPERIMENTAL STATION
The University of Michigan gas ex-
perimental station has just received a
gift of $500 from the Mi-chigan State
-gas association to enable further ex-
perimental work.
Robert Rowley of Detroit, who was .
graduated from here last year, is try-
ing to find a method to remove tar
from gas. At present he is the holder
of the Michigan State gas association
fellowship.

I .

TO D A Y

eniors and Juniors intend-
of city Monday and Tues-
week should call at Athle-
at once to make arrange
relative to reservations.

SOUTH DAKOTA

VS. MICHIGAN

USHERS! The Athletic Association will
-pay a fee of 50c for ushering at Cor-
nell Game. 'Ail desiring to 'usher
should call at Athletic Office
immediately

EVENT NO.

8

Ferry Field 2:30 -P.1

Admission 50 cents

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