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June 04, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 1914.

PRiCIfl FIV

f
r ,.'

2

EVENTS FOR TODAY

"I

Prof. A. S. Johnson speaks in
248 engineering building,
o'clock.

room
2:001

PROFESSORS PLAN
VARIED VACATIONS
Extenshie Journeys Are Outlined in
Foreign Countries and it
United States

STATISTICS FAVOR.
LARGE ENROLLMENT
Advance Figures For Summer Session.
Predict Record-Breaking
Attendance

EVENTS OF TOMORROW

EUROPE SEEMS F AVORITE SPOT EXIALMING COURSE TO REMAIN,

gan-Notre Dame baseball game,
ry field, 4:05 o'clock.
ganensian dinner, Michigan Un-
6:00 o'clock.
-up club dinner, Michigan Union,
) o'clock.
lit dance, Granger's 9:00 o'clock.

So

EROFESSOR JO1JNSON GIVES
tAST OF LECTURES TODAY
fter Prof. AlviN S. Johnson of Cornell'
delivered the second of his series of
ar-
three lectures before Professor Ham-
ha- ilton's classes in economics on Wed-
:ay nesday. The subject of the talk was
the "The Future of the Socialist Party
n's Policy." Professor Johnson 'will de-
The liver the final address this afternoon
the at 2:00 o'clock in room 348 of the new
and engineering building on "Social Re-
top form and the Outlawing of Property."
ler The public may attend.
ion ORATORICAL BOARD
ct-
etADVISESNEW NAME
one --_ .
After a hot fight, the Oratorical
board decided~not to allow the former
ec- Adelphi debating society to assume
vas the name of "The University House of
iad Representatives," which the society
had voted to adopt on reorganizing.
The board recommended that the new
in
society call itself "The Adelphi House
his of Representatives," and guaranteed
ay, that the title "House of Representa-
-y. tives" would notbe e thizar .fonr ue"
rr7iny of the other literary societies.
ke- As a result of the change made by
sill Adelphi,raso mplete change of policy
may take place in the debating socie-
at ties, several plans being discussed by
est the Oratorical board. In the past, the
societies have served mainly to train
men for the Varsity debates, while it
is now proposed to have them train
men in extemporaneous speaking, and
to take the debating preliminaries out
ed of the societies, establishing tryouts
ext open to all.
ast - -------__ _____ _____
en NEW BIOLOGICAl LAB BE1N(1
al- ERECTED AT DOUGLAS LAKE
fl

Midiigan's professors and instruct-
ors will scatter to all parts of the
world when the 1913-1914 session'
comes to an end. Many will spend the
summer in Europe, some for travel,
some for rest and some for study. Oth-
er members of the faculty will take
extended trips in this country, while
a few will assume duties in other in-
stitutions of learning, and also along,
other professional lines.
Prof. W. J. Hussey, director of the
astronomical observatory, will leave
in June for Argentine, South America,
there he will spend the, next six
months teaching at the University of
La Plata, in accordance with an agree-
ment between that university and the
University of Michigan.
Prof. Reuben Peterson of the medi-
cal department, will make an extend-
ed automobile tour through Europe as-
a member of the American Genecologi-
cal Scciety, for the purpose of inspect-
ing various hospitals and their meth-
ods, in Germany, England, Scotland,,
France and Switzerland. Prof. Peter-
son will also spend part of the sum-
mer traveling in Italy. - >
Prof. R. W. Bunting of the dental
department, will represent the Univar-
ity of Michigan at the international
dental congress to be held in London.
Mkiss E. S. Houghton, assistant in
fin, arts, will spend the summer stud-
ying in England and France.
Others who intend going to Europel
for the summer are: Prof. H. R. Cross
of the Fine Arts department; Prof. E.
R. Turner of the history department;
Prof. J. G..1. xinter of Erie reek and
Latin departments; Prof. C. A. Bur-
rett of the homeopathic department;
Prof. J..4P. Bird of the F'ren'ch depart-
Bent; Prof. W. A. Frayer of the his-
tory department; Mr. F. E. Robbins of
the Greek department; and Mr. Rene
Talamon of the French department.
The following professors have al-
ready sailed for 1,urope: A. A. Stanley
of the music department; F. N. Scott,
of the rhetoric department; and F. C.
Newcombe, of the department of bot-
Dean M. E. Cooley of the engineering
department, and Prof. David Friday of
the accounting department, will spend'
the greater part of the summer in the
evaluation of the Pere Marquette rail-
road. Dean Cooley will also spend
several weeks "roughing it" in the
woods of Canada.
Prof. J. S. P. Tatlock of the English
department, will teach at .Dartmouth
during the summer. Prof. C. S. Berry,
of the educational department, will be
one of the organizers of a summer
school for teachers of backward and
mentally deficient children, to be open-
ed' at Lapeer, Michigan, this summer.
Prof. H. A. Gleason, of the department
of botany, will be assistant director in
charge of the summer camp at Lake
Douglas.
Mr. W, W. Tupper, of the department
of botany, will carry on research work
(Continued on page 4)

According to statistics given out by
the dean of the summer school, pros-
pects are brighter than ever before
foi! a record breaking session for, the
1914 term.
The informal registration at 6:00
o'clock Monday night showed an en-
rollment of 99, an increase of 31 over
the total at this time last year, or bet-
ter than 40 per cent increase. The cor-
respondence relative to enrolling in
the 1914 session, which had been re-
ceived to June 1, was heavier than it
Iyas for the entire session of 1913.
There will be a large increase in
students taking anatomy in the medi-
cal school, as 25 dental students have
made arrangements to take their re-
.quired anatomy work duing the corn-
ing session, instead of during the fir'st
semester of the following year.
There have been more than 10 ap-
plicants for the course In embalming,
so the regents will not discontinue it
at the end of the session as was plan-
ned.
STADIUM FORMS NOW EXCEED
NORTH .BLEACHERS IN HEIGIHT
Work on the stadium is steadily pro-
gressing. The forms for 42 rows of
seats are now erected, making the
stand about three feet higher than the
north stand. When completed with
13 more rows, it will be 16 feet higher
than the north stand.
Engineer Weeks states that the
pouring of the concrete superstruc-
ture will be done by July 15, the drain-
ing and toilet systems will be in by
the first of August, and that the stands
will be complete about the end of Sep-
tember. They will not be opened,
however, until the formal dedication
comes off on the day of the Penn
game.
Wisconsin University has written
Engineer Weeks for the plans of the
new stadium. They intend to build one
modeled, to a great extent, after it.
Junior Lits Lay Advisory System Plans
In order to secure the advantage of
an early start in organizing the senior
advisory system, the junior lits will
meet at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in room 203 Tappan hall, and ar-
range to cope with the problemn next
year. Karl B. Hoch, '14, chairman of
the senior advisory committee this
year, will be present to explain the de-
tails of the plan.
As employed this year, the system
proved successful during the frst few
weeks of school.
Detroit Alumni Club Staging Exhibit
The University of Michigan club of
Detroit has sent out cards announcing
a special art exhibit to be given Sat-
urday afternoon, June 6, from 2:00 to
4:00 o'clock. Those desiring to obtain
admission to the exhibit should send
cards at - once to J. M. O'Dea, 73Y
Broadway, Detroit.

PRESIDENT-EMTERITUS ANGELL
UNABLE TO SPEAK AT DINNER
Union Monthly Event Draws Out
Crowd; Regatta Awards Presented
to Winners
Owing to a slight indisposition,
President-Emeritus James B. Angell
was unable to be present at the last
Union membership dinner of the year,
which was held last night. Registrar
A. G. Hall, who took the place of Dr.
Angell upon the program, stated that
his condition was not serious, and that
Dr. Angell would probably be around
again in a fewj days.
More than 175 were present at the
dinner, and Werner W. Schroeder, '14,
acted as toastmaster for the occasion.
Beside Registrar Hall, speeches were
made by Dean H. M. Bates, Judge E.
D. Kinne, '64, of the Washtenaw Cir-
cuit, president Selden Dickenson, '15L,
and president-elect P. D. Koontz, '14.
The cups, ribbons and medals which
were offered to the Boat club Regatta
event winners were presented by H. S.
Hulbert. A musical program was fur-
nished by Waldo Fellows, '14, and by a
trio composed of Bruce D. Bromley,

OLD ?LAI
ORGANIIAJ
Is 01550
Seven Fraternities Voiuntai
Submitted Their Resign
Froni Historic
Body
DISBANDMENT OF SOCIET
NOT FORCED BY AUTI
Action Taken Aims Toward

re

The Pal
posed of
on the ca

'14, George P. Becker,
V. Allman, grad.

lit, and RussellI

ized by the withdraws
eight members. Chi
fraternity at Michigan
senting member of the
The passing of the1
-the dissolution of one
oldest organizations,
for the double purpose
gether the then \exis'

DECIDE TIE FOR.
DIAMOND HONORS

To settle the tiff
the finals of the
series the senior
the junior laws8

for second place in
interclass baseball
engineers will neet
at 4:00 o'clock this

and for the publication of "1
dium," the year book. Witl
ing over of the year book by ti
sity as -4he "Michiganensian
ganization became largely so
nature.

adner, '16;
mn manag-
of Michi-

- I

'15, was
r of the
Forestry

A new- biological laboratory, for the
use of the botany and zoology depart-
ments, is being erected at Douglas
lake, and vill be ready for use when-
the summer school students arrive in
July. The laboratory is one story in
height, and 21 by 50 feet. It will pro-
vide one room 18 feet, six inches by
21 feet, for instruction purposes, and
a general laboratory 21 by 24 feet.
Previous to this time, the station lab-
oratpries have been two old log houses
without floors.
There have already been 38 appli-
cants for registration at the summer
biological station, while the total reg-
istration in the station last year was
but 29.
LATIN-AMERICAN CLUB GIVES /
PRESIDENT TO BIASCOEC1IEA

afternoon on SoutU F.*erry niewu.
The numerals for the two highest
teams are bought by the athletic asso-1
clation and the other, two sets of let-
ters are given by the class.
The winner of today's battle will be
the second of the two teams to get
their numerals from the athletic as-
sociation, while the loser and the soph
lits will be the teams to receive their
insignia through their respective
classes.-
All the caps are ordered by the ath-
letic association, and those who have
not already been fitted are asked to
report at Director Rowe's office for
measurement this morning. If all the
orders are in by today the caps will be
given out before the university closes.
LOCAL DIXIE CLUB TO ELECT
FIRST NATIONAL PRESIDENT
Dixie club will hold a smoker and
business meeting at 7:00 o'clock to-
night at the Union. The president of
the National Association of Dixie clubs
will be elected and the constitution of
the national association will be read
and passed upou by the local club.
The National Association of Di-xie
clubs was formed during the Christmas
vacation by representatives from the
universities of Michigan,'Illinois, Wis-
consin, and Chicago. Michigan was
given the privilege of electing the first
president from among the members
of the local organization.
E. B. PALMER WINS SECOND
FLIGHT OF GOLF TOURNAMENT
E. B. Palmer, '17, won the finals of
the second flight of the U. of M. Golf
Association tournament Monday from
H. Robbins, '15, by a score of seven up
and six. Palmer's score was 54 for
the twelve holes played. This game
ended the spring tournament of the
association.
Engineering Society Elects President
A. T. Ricketts, '15E, was elected
president of the .civil section of the
Engineering Society at its annual elec-
tion held yesterday morning. The
other officers elected are: vice-presi-
dent and secretary, G. F. Prussing,
'15E; treasurer, R. Watt,<'15E.

Phi'Kappa Psi-Fran
Sigma Phi-Edwin W
Upon receipt of this
the following letter was
non-palladium fraterni
"To the President of -
Dear Sir:--
It is my p'rivilege to
the organizatioin known
um, by action of its ow:
ly one fraternity final
has been discontinued,
been taken in the beli
I may quote the words
the signatures of the
ties it has been forma
me, "for the greater
university as well as
betterment of the frater
Because I have every rc
that this action has bee
a genuine regard for
avowed, as well as with
or threat from the uni'
ties, I -feel sure that
fraternity as one of the
palladium fraternities
this and -so will take
done in the same spirit
been done and, being
old partisan division,
in all such services to
as the fraternities at
to render. Of course, a
suggest, the passing of
is our own affair and
matter for special pub]

port
of tl

make k
organi:

Alpha Dell
Zeta Psi-
Beta Theta

-L.

as-

ibert Roth,
duate class
mally pre-

lohl Sing Tonight
ld their first class
ck tonight, under
ce Bromley and
1 lead the- songs,
dolin club will be

Diego A. Biascoechea, 'l6M, was
chosen president of the Latin-Ameri-
can club for the school year of 1914-15
at the annual election held last Sun-
day. The other officers who were elect-
ed are: vice-president, Galo W. Blan-
co, '15E; secre'tary, Pedro J. Zamora,
'17; treasurer, Manuel A. del Valle,
'16; and assistant treasurer, Argimiro
Morales, '17.

THE FUNERAL MARCH WILL BE FEATURED AT THE
191 Po-EamnatonDance
Friday, June 5th
Join the Mourners! l.urial Public! No Flowers!
Granger's Chapel. 9 to Midnight.
Set Back-Six Bits.
WATCH THIS SPACE TOMORR.OW

Body

ected Clair
it council.

............. MAO- mmmwmwm

1914

h

Michiganensian
ARLY SOLD OUT

Year

NEI

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