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October 17, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LITY IS THE BED
TRUE GREATNESS.

he

Michigd~k man

Daily

COMPETITION IS THE LIF]
OF TRA DE AND ALSO SPORT

_ .

Vol. XXIV, No. 16.

ANN A RBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

______ __
,.

SECRET DRILL
IS HELD FOR
MA.C. BATTLE
Practice Behind Closed Gates Marks
End of Stiff Prearation
For Aggie Game
Saturday.
BACKFIELD OFFERS MAIN
PUZZLE TO MICHIGAN COACH

* * * * * ~* * * * * *
* CANDIDATES FOR MANAGE- *
* RIAL ELECTIONS SAT- *
* URDAY. *
* -o-
* Baseball Manager:- *
* Walter Emmons, Herbert *
* Muckley. *
* Track Manager:- *
* Charles A. Crowe, Gordon C. *
.Eldredge. *
* Assistant Baseball Mgrs.:- *
* Percy Crane, E. R. Hazen, *
* Ralph F. Khuen, Chester H. *
* Lang. *
* Assistant Track Mgrs.:- *
* Emmet F. Connely, Lyle Har- *
* ris, Beresford Palmer,, Vic- *
tor Pinnell. *
FAMOUS ATHLETE
TAKEN BY DEATH

NI

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * * * *
RUSH RE(GUILATIONS.
-o-
Place-South Ferry field.
Time-9:30 o'clock, Saturday
morning.
Contestants-All men in their
first and second year's attend-
ance at the university.
Points-Total 5, 1 for each end
pole, 2 for center pole, and 1
for cane spree.
* * * * * * * * ,*

"Brute" Pontius My Appear in Rol
of Fullback Before Game
Is Finished.
Under a veil of carefully preserve
secrecy, Coach Yost trimmed the las
rough edges off the Varsity combin
tion that will probably face the so
tillers in the opening minutes of Satui
day's play. This practice, devoid o
all scrimmage or rough work, marke
the last stage of preparation for thi
contest, as tomorrow the order will b
rest for the sore muscles and othe
minor injuries.
It is still the backfield that furnish
es the most puzzling problem to th
Michigan mentor, and its exact identi
ty will not be known until the men lin
up on Ferry field. Mead appeared t
have the call for a backfield positio
during the earlier part of the week
and would *seem the logical man t
start the game, if a strained ligamen
in the shoulder will be in shape b
Saturday. With Catlett and Bentle
as partners the Wolverines would pre
sent a strong offensive front to th
enemy, with Bentley to ward off dan
ger to the goal line by his boot.
These two players are sure to beg
the Saturday imbroglio, if steady us
on the first string eleven is any indi
cation. Bastian will probably appea
in the role of half-back before the cur
tam has been rung on the last play
and Quinn would seem due for a whir
at the backfield pivot job. From th
developments of this last week, i
would not surprise Michigan footbal
followers if Pontius of line fame fo
the past two years, were shifted t
show his worth as fullback for part o
the game. In case of injury to the lit
tle giant, the choice should fall o
Galt, who has been the chief under
study while not wheeling off end run
from the halfback position. Galt ma
see a little action Saturday from thi
point, if he sufficiently recovers fro
injuries, and Roehm may be called int
requisition to general the team.
When it comes to deciding the make
up across the line, Yost has a simple
situation to deal with, as the ends pre
sent the only approach to a puzzle
Torbet, the veteran, is practically as
sured of his berth, and is due to star
at one extremity, but on the othe:
wing, Lyons and James are to be con
sidered. Lyons stands in a fair wa
of being picked to start from his wor
under fire in the two victories of th
past two weeks.
Musser and Pontius can be expecte
to be in at tackles from the start, wit
Raynsford on tap, if Pontius receive
the call to the backfield. Traphage
and Allmendinger will in all probabil
ity guard the home interests on eac
side of Captain Paterson.
The Michigan leader is expected t
do the place kicking when in the vicin
ity of the alien goal. In this even
Traphagen would do the passing.
The probable lineup and the weight
of the men follow:
Michigan-Torbet (172) L.E.; Mus
ser (200) L.T.; Traphagen (178) L.G.
Paterson (219) (Captain) C.; Allmen
dinger (198) R.G.; Pontius (193) o
Raynsford (174 R.T.; Lyons (170))
R.E.; Hughitt (146) Q.; Catlett (158)
(Continued on page 4.)

MA C.
GA
ti
1
an
T x Y ',

i _ "
~ _r " J p F Y
=\

f Ralph Rose, Noted Weight Thrower,
d Dies of Typhoid Fever In
s Far West.
e
r COMPETED AT OLYMPIC GAMES.
i- Ralph Rose, famous weight man and
e holder of two Michigan track records,
- died yesterday morning in Safi Fran-
e
o cisco after a long siege of typhiod fe-
n ver.
' Rose entered the university in 1904
.o
t andcompeted in the western confer-
y ence track meet where he won both
Y the shot and discus events. In the
same year he ran in the Philadelphia
e relays. In the year 1905 he tried out
for football and though he was speedy
a for a man of his weight and size he
e did not play.
- During the following Christmas va-
r cation, he entered a meet held by the
Boston Athletic Association and was
r, thereby barred from further partici-
l pation in University athletics.
e Rose then left the university and
t completed his law education elsewhere
l1 at a later date. .When Rose left school,
r he held Varsity records in the 16
U pound hammer throw with a distance
f of 158 feet, 4 2-3 inches and the 16-
- pound shot put with a record of 48
n feet, 4 1-2 inches.
- After leaving school, Rose competed
s in many important athletic meets in
Y this country and represented the Unit-
s ed States in the Olympic games at
n London and Copenhagen.
DEAN FULTON OF 0. S. U. TO
- OPEN 1913 LECTURE COURSE.
r
- Dean Robert Irving Fulton of Ohio
Wesleyan University, will give a dra-
- matic recital tonight at 8:00 o'clock
t in University Hall, the lecture being
r the first on the Oratorical Association
- program which includes lectures by
y John Jacob Riis, Newell Dwight Hillis,
k and Mrs. Beecher.
e
"NAME ME" CONTEST WILLt
d FEATURE TONIGHT'S "MIXER"
h
s Plans have been completed for the
n opening ""Mixer" to be held at the
- Michigan Union tonight. Complete in-
1 formality is the aim of the committee
under the chairmanship of Maurice
o Meyers, and present interest indicates
- a large attendance. Among other at-
t tractions is the "name me" cont'est for
which the winner will receive a class
s pipe.
- Old Football Man Joins Wedded Ranks
Walter J. Thienes, '14E, was married
- to Eleanor J. Gipe of Indianapolis, in,
r that city, July 7. Thienes was a mem-
ber of Triangles and Owls, played on,
his class basketball team, and was
manager of his class football teama.

YOU CAN'T GET 1WAX TOMORROW.

MIMES ELECTS
NEW MEMBERS
TO OPERA WORK
Committee Will Be Picked Thursday
to Make Plans for Staging
of Production
in March.
RETiVAL OF MIINSTREL SHOW
MAY BE ATTEMPTEI) THIS YEAR
Paul Daugherty, '14L, Is Chosen Pres-
ident; Arthur Cohen, '141,
Manages Dramatics.
Although five months remain before
the 1914 Michigan Union opera is
staged during the last week in March,
active preparations have already be-
gun by the Mimes and Karl B. 41'och,j
'14, general chairman. At a special
meeting of the Mimes at the Union
next Thursday, committees will be
picked and the chairmen instructed to
begin work in their various depart-
ments.
At the last meeting of the Mimes the
following twelve men were elected to
membership: Roy M. Parsons, '14,
Sam L. Adelsdorf, '14L, B. E. Kline, '14,
Waldo E. Fellows, '14, Bruce Bromley,
'14, Durward Grimstead, '15, George
Moritz, '15, Gordon C. Eldredge, '14,'
Kenneth Westerman, '14, Lyle Clift,
'14, Edwin Wilson, '15, and Sylvan
Grosner, '14L. The selections in most
cases were made from the principals of1
the cast of "Contrarie Mary." The
present membership is 25 and five
more members will probably be picked
during the year.
Revival of the Michigan Union min-
strel show, last given in 1911, was dis-
cussed by the Mimes. Although noth-
ing has been definitely formulated, it
will probably be seriously considered
if faculty consent can be obtained. 1
Those in charge of the 1914 opera
are determined tooemploy the months
between now and March to the best
advantage, and as soon as the com-
mittees have been appointed a system
of tryouts will be perfected and pros-
pective broilers will be given general
directions. Preliminary practicingl
will be light and rehearsing will
begin after the Christmas vacation.

ELECTIONS BY

CLASSES WILL'
BE HELD TODAY
Sophomore Medics Experience Scarcity
of Permanent Candidates,
Nine Withdraw
From Race.
ROWL AN) F X EL M)MOINATED
s' OR SENIOit LAW PRESIDENCY
Student Councilman Will Have Charge
of the Elections as Judges
at Balloting.
Elections in all classes, except the
sophomore medic and freshman class-
es, will' be held on the campus today,
Nine nominees for office in the sopho-
more medic class have withdrawn their
names as candidates, on the plea that
heavy studies will not permit them to
participate in class activities.
As a result of these wholesale res-
ignations, the offices of president, sec-
retary, treasurer and basketball man-
ager cannot be filled today. Among
those resigning was Warren T. Vaugh-
an, and who was one of the nominees
for class president. Another attempt
will be made to fill the offices at a
meeting of the class this morning at
11:00 o'clock in the east lecture roomp
of the medical building.
No trouble is anticipated in other
elections. C. A. Crowe, one of the
nominees for president of the senior
engineering class, last night notified
the election board of the student coun-
cil that he had withdrawn his name
for further consideration. No nomi-
nating petitions were handed in to the
election board of the senior lits. Row-
land Fixel, of the senior law class, has
been nominated by petition for the
presidency. All other class nomina-
tions stand as made at the regular
meetiggs.
The fresh law class will be organiz-
ed this afternoon at 4:00 o'clock in
room D of the law building. Other
freshman classes will meet next week.
Student councilmen will have charge
of each election. Notice was sent out
last night to the election judges at each
voting place to hand in a complete list
(Continued from page 1.)

:Detroit Central Vs. Ann Arbor Today.
Ann Arbor high school and Detroit
Central high are slated to lock horns
this afternoon at 3:15 on the Fair
grounds gridiron.
VETERANS APPEAR
FOR CLASS TEAMS
Four Teams Number Among Candi-
dates For Places Many Heavy
and Experienced Men.
SENIOR SQUADS LOOM UP BEST.
If weight, speed and experience are
the necessary requirements for a
champion football team, pre-schedule
figures indicate that campus honors
this fall lie between the senior lits,
senior laws, junior laws and senior
engineers. These four teams are said
to average above 170 pounds and have
in their line-ups men who have had
previous experience on various college
elevens,
The junior law aggregation is com-
posed mainly of experienced players
and this fact alone gives it a good
chance for the interclass title. Rob-
erts, who has played three years on
Penn State's Reserves, is calling sig-
nals for the junior barristers and
Broussard at center, served two. sea-
sons on the Jefferson College Varsity,
Christman in the backfield and Brown
in the line have seen service on the
Olivet Varsity and the University of
Missouri Reserves, respectively.
The senior engineers will rely on
speed and a heavy line to carry away
the honors. With McQueen, Varsity
baseball player at right half, Mueller
at full, La Londe at left half and Mc-
Kean at quarter, the rivet drivers'
backfield will not tip the scales at
more than 150 pounds to the man, but
the super-abundance of beef in the
line will offset the light backfield.
The senior lits present the heaviest
team that has ever contended for a
campus championship and still their
backfield is speedier than that of any
other class team. Arthur Kohler, 219
pounds, Varsity track captain, is hold-
ing down full back while Bond, Var-
sity sprinter, will be seen at one of the
halves.
CHICAGO ALUMNI OFFER
VALUABLE SCHOLARSHIPS
Four-year scholarships, amounting
to three hundred dollars a year have
been offered by the Chicago Alumni
Association to high school graduates
of Cook county. Lester Waterbury, of
Lane Technical High School, and Cyril
Talbot, of New Trier High School,
were the two men to secure scholar-
ships this year. Dr. James R. Angell,
'90, dean of the literary department in
the University of Chicago, supervises
the funds.
Woolsack Holds Election of Officers.
Henry C. Bogle was elected chancel-
lor of Woolsack, the honorary society
of the junior law class at its first meet-
ing of the year. Walter I McKenzie
was elected vice-chancellor and Edwin
R. Thurston, Clerk.

' NAME LEADERS
FOR FRESHMEN
IN BIDRUSHES
Wild Enthusiasm Prevails When F rt
Year Students Organize
For Annual Rush
Saturday.
YEARLINGS CHOOSE OFFICERS
THEN STAGE GREAT PARADE.
Sophs to Meet Tonight to Hear Rules
For Coming Flag Battle
and Spree.
If ehthusiasm, lung power and "pep"
count for anything in a flag rush, the
freshmen have already won the con-
test with the sophs, scheduled for Sat-
urday morning at South Ferry field.
For an hour and a half last night
more than 900 yearlings kept the west
physics lecture room ringing with
cheers, pausing only at intervals to
hearken to the words of wisdom from
Football Captain George Paterson,Mil-
ler Pontius, Edward Saier, Arthur
Kohler and the president of the stu-
dent council.
Besides hearing an explanation of
the rules of the rush, the freshmen
were impressed with the necessity of
upholding Michigan traditions, which
in the words of the president of the
council, "can only be done in this case
by every man in the class turning out
Saturday; fighting fair, and fighting
hard."
After the enthusiasm had subsided
enough to permit the carrying on of
business, R. P. Ransom was elected
leader of the freshman forces, and D.
M. Flaitz, H. E. O'Brien, B. Hicks, and
J. C. Stapleton were chosen as his as-
sistants. E. K. Marshall, C. L. Mc-
Bride, and T. J. Enright were selected
to act as cheerleaders. All freshmen
are to meet at the campus flag pole at
8:30 o'clock Saturday morning, where
they will receive further instructions.
Sophomores will meet tonight at
7:00 o'clock at the west physics lecture
room to complete their plans and stim-
ulate their "pep." Carrol B. Haff will
give the "fight instilling" talk tonight.
Edward Saier will perside, Arthur
Kohler will explain the rules, and
Harold Hulbert will give the student
council viewpoint of the rush,
So much "pep" was uncorked last
night, that after the meeting about
250 freshmen couldn't settle down to
study, but in spite of councilmanl
warnings, attempted to rush the Ma-
jestic and the Whitney theatres. Quick
action on the part of council members
prevented free entrance at either plac-
es, and the crowd disbanded soon with-
out doing any damage.
The following are the rules and reg-
ulations for the Freshman-Sophomore
pole rush and cane spree.
1. There shall be 3 poles, 26 feet
above the ground and 100 feet apart in
a north and south line.
2. There shall be nailed to the tops
of the extreme poles, a banner 6 feet
long, by 3 feet wide, made of blue den-
im with a yellow "M."
3. The freshmen shall defend the
three poles.
4. The sophomores shall advance in
two nearly equal columns from oppo-
site sides of the field, and advance to-
ward the end.poles.
5. It shall be the object of the soph-
omores to gain posession of the three
fiags in thirty minutes.
6. All flags 'taken must be turned
over to the referee immediately. At

a regular meeting of the student coun-
cil, the flag will be presented to the in-
dividual taking it.
The participants in the cane spree
(Continued on page 4.)

DON'T FORGET, A MOTION PICTURE F HE ENTIRE STUDENT BODY
of Michigan University will be taken Saturday afternoon at 1:30 at Ferry Field just south of Club House
Tske the special seats provided as soon as you arrive. This film will be a part of one showing student life in the class room, on the athletic field and in various amusements. The
picture will be shown over a circuit including your home town and the picture of each student will appear long enough on the screen that he may be easily identified.
Turn out! Show your class spirit.
This film which will give about a one hour show will be shown with 'eight other leading Universities at the Panama Exposition. The president and faculty are co-operating with us in making this an
interesting film. The largest panorama picture ever made at any University will also be taken at this time. University Life Film Co.

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