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May 21, 1914 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-21

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The

Michigan

Daily

Vol. XXIV, No. 165.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1914.

PRIME FIVE CE

* * * * * * * * *

MICHIGAN WINS
CL.OSE CONTEST
O FROM__CORNELL
Wolverines Take Advantage of Their
Lonely Trio of Hits and Crab
3 to 2 Victory From
Ithacans
EASTERNERS MAKE STRONG
RALLY IN NINTH INNING

Baribean Is Lundgren's Cholie
Today's Battle Againsi
Princeton

fo

(Detroit News Service)
ITHACA, N. Y., May 20.--Making the
best of their lonesome trio of hits, the
touring Wolverines took a nerve-rack-
ing game 'here today from Cornell by
a 3 to 2 score, thus keeping intact
their record -of wins for the eastern
invasion.
The winners took advantage of ev-
cry possible opening to score, making
their hits, though few and far between,
count for everything that they were
worth, and utilizing the Ithacans' er-
rors for an advance each time. On the
other hand, the losers were unable to
get past the Michigan defense, which
tightened every time danger approach-
ed.
Despite their determined resistence,
the Wolverines came near to throwing
away the game in the last inning. With
the score at 3 to 1, Halstead got on
first with a single and went to second
on a fielders choice. With two strikes
an Shirrick, Ferguson messed up his
slow grounder, Halstead went home
and Shirrick was safe on first. The
lanky pitcher further complicated the
situation by passing Donovan. Wi-th
two men on basesand Michigan's de-
fense seemingly shattered at last, the
stands were wild in pulling for anoth-
er score to tie up the battle. But La-
badie gathered in Bill's long fly into
his territory and the game was over.
It was a case of the Wolverines
classing' themselves as "hitless won-
ders" when the occasion demanded.
Though accustomed to amassing their
victories via the swatting route, the
tourists were just as much at home
when minus the hits. Baker, Sheehy
and McQueen were the only ones to
land safely on Russell's slants, but
they inserted their hits'into the fray
at the right moments, and the result
(Continued on page 4)
GEORGETOWN TAKES REVENGE
ON WOLYRINE TENNIS FOUR
Michigan Men Lose, 4 to 2, in Fourth
Match of Trip; Play Johns.
Hopkins Today
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
WASHINGTON, D. C., May 20.-
Georgetown university won today's
match with the touring Michigan ten-
nis team, 4 to 2, thus taking revenge
on the same four Wolverine men
whom last year they fell before. Mich-
igan captured one singles and one
doubles contest; Captain Wilson beat
O'Boyle, and Andrews and Hall defeat-
ed O'Boyle and Devlin.
The scores follow: Singles.-Wilson
(M) defeated O'Boyle (G) 8-6, 7-9,
8-6; Morgan (G) defeated Reindel (M)
6-3, 8-6; Hillger (G) defeated An-
drews (M) 6-2, 6-3; McLean (G) de-
feated Hall (M) 6-8, 6-4, 6-2.
Doubles-Andrews and Hall (M) de-
feated O'Boyle and Devlin (G) 6-4,
6-1; Hillger and Morgan (G) defeat-
ed Wilson and Reindel (M) 6-3, 3-6,
Michigan will play the fifth match
of their eastern schedule against Johns
Hopkins at Baltimore tomorrow.

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Joan of Arc Pageant, ferry field, 7:30
o'clock.
Kentucky club dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
Fresh engineer class dinner, Michigan
Union, 6:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Engineering social club dance, Michi-
gan Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Michigan Interscholastic meet, Ferry
field, 2:30 o'clock.
Annual International banquet of Cos-
mopolitan club, Newberry hall, 6:15
o'clock.
All senior sing at 7:00 o'clock, Memo-
rial hall steps.
1916 Engineers meet at M. C. station,
7:15 o'clock; for "pow-wow" at Cas-
cade Glen.
Band concert, 7:30 o'clock, on campus.
BOARD IN CONTROL
MEMBERS ELECTED
W. C. Mullendore, '14-'16L, S. Dick-
enson, '13-'15L, and H. R. Abbott, 13-
'15A, were the successful candidates
in the election of student members of
the board in control of student publi-
cations yesterday afternoon. The total
number of votes cast was 352, which is
the smallest ballot within the last
three years.
The returns were as follows: W. C.
Mullendore, '14-'16L, 195; S. Dicken-
son, '13-'15L, 188; H. It. Abbott, '13-
'15E, 136; Karl Mohr, '13-'15L, 127;
Edward Saier, '13-'15L, 105; Fred B.
Foulk, '13-'15L, 86 Cecil Brown, '15,
78; and Allen Ricketts, '15E, 56.
The three student members-elect
will act in conjunction with four mem-
bers of the faculty, chosen by the fac-
ulty, in regulating all student publi-
cations during the next school year.
FRESH-SOPH TENNIS 3ATCH
RESULTS IN A 2 TO 2 TIE
The fresh-soph match in the inter-
class tennis series, resulted in a tie
yesterday afternoon, each team taking
two singles matches and the doubles
remaining unplayed.
The scores of the singles follow:
Hart defeated Thorsh 6-2, 3-6, 6-1;
Grylls defeated Alexander 6-0, 6-2;,
Cohn defeated Barthel 6-2, 6-0, and
Cohn also defeated Bradbeer 6--2,
4-6, 7-5. The sphomores will play
the juniors this afternoon.
MORAL EDUCATOR TO SPEAK
AT UNION ON SUNDAY NIGHT
Clifford G. Roe, former assistant
state's attorney of Illinois, and at pres-
ent president of the American Bureau
of Moral Education, will lecture at thei
Union at 6:00 o'clock Sunday night on
some phase of the vice problem. Mr.
Roe has had a prominent part in re-1
cent white slave cases, and is said toi
be well informed on the subject. I

"The Old Order Changeth"
y _
- s - -
4
Medievalism to Startle Ferry Field
"The old is new,"' muses the Para- The story circles about 12 princi-
doxical philosopher. pals, but it is in the big mass effects
And it is on this principle that 400 that the pageant appeals. Gay dances
student actors expect to startle cam- of the peasants, stately marches of the
pus ultra-moderns on Ferry field to- courtiers and torch bearers, and cos-
night at 7:30 o'clock as kings, arch tumes of riotous designs give the ef-
bishops and peasants in a splash of fif- fect. A costumed orchestra plays dur-
tecnth centuryism. ing most ofthe performance, one se-
Jeanne d'Arc in pageantry is the lection having been written especially
undertaking of the women's league, for the pageant by Mr. Earl Moore.
which by an expenditure of nearly Spot and flood lights from the top of
$2,000 and after months of preparation, the stand will illumine the area in
is able to present a spectacle of giant front of the "walls" where the action
proportions, historically accurate in takes place. Two sentinels pace the
'details. fortifications, and the towers of a city
Miss Miriam Hubbard, '16,who plays stand out realistically in the distance.
the role of Jeanne, is experienced on Tickets will be sold at the gate be-
horseback. She appeared at the re- fore the pageant and during the day
hearsal yesterday on a nervous but seats will be on sale in University
well-behaved charger, followed by sev- hall. About $400.00 was taken in yes-
en supporters, all mounted on white terday, making an average sale per
steeds of a martial appearance. day of nearly $300.00.
Eminent Scientist Is Visiting in City Dr. Harry Loeffler Buried Yesterday
President-Emeritus Ira Remsen, of Funeral services for Dr. Harry
Johns Hopkins University, founder of Loeffler , '07D, who died last Monday
the American Chemical Journal, is night of muscular rheumatism, were
visiting in the city and is staying with held yesterday afternoon at his home.
Professor J. S. Reeves,. of the politi- Mr. Loeffler was the son of Dr. E. C.
cal science department. A dinner was Loeffler, a member of the faculty of
given yesterday at the Union in his the dental department, and maintained
honor by the alumni of Johns Hop- an' office in Detroit for a number of

1*
I-
k'.
*
I *

Pres. Hutchins to Speak at Banquet
President-Emeritus J. B. Angell and
Pres. H. R. Hutchins will be the prin-
cipal speakers at the Cosmopolitan club
banquet tomorrow night at 6:00
o'clock in Newberry hall. An election
of officers for the coming year will
be held before the banquet.
INTERSCHOLASTIC
PLANS COMPLETED
All in Readiness for High School
Athletes' Entertainment While
in Ann Arbor .

AHLETIC ASSOCIATION
ELECTION
The Candidates
Baseball manager-P. H. Crane,
'15, and Chester H. Lang, '15.
Track manager-Emmett Con-
nely, '15, and W.B. Palmer, '15.
Assistant Baseball Managers-
Harold Easley, '16, C. E. Stry-
ker, '16E, Russell Stearns, '16,
and Sidney T. Steen, '16E.
Assistant Track Manager-J. A,
Barnard, '16, J. W. Finken-
staedt, Eng., M. M. Beaver,
'16, J. M. McKinney, '16.
Time-Saturday, 8:30 to 1:00.
Place-University hall.
* * * * * * ,* *

VISITORS TO SEE

PAGEANTI

Preparations for the, sixteenth an-
nual interscholastic track meet, which
will be staged at Ferry field tomorrow
and Saturday afternoons at 2:30
o'clock, have been practically com-
pletedkbyhManager PatrickaD. Koontz
and his corps of assistants.
Many teams will arrive in this city
this afternoon and will be admitted
free to the pageant this evening. All
contestants will register at the trophy
room in Waterman gymnasium tomor-
row morning between 8:00 and 11:00
o'clock at which time their numbers'
and tickets will be given out. At 11:00
o'clock automobiles, which will be fur-
nished by students and Ann Arbor cit-
izens, will leave the gymnasium and
show the young athletes about the city.
The final decision of the interscho-
lastiQ eligibility committee, as arrived
at yesterday noon, is that Keewatin'
Academy of Wisconsin will be allowed
to compete. Several protests had been
received from schools in this .state
concerning the eligibility of two of
Keewatin's stars but were found to
be invalid.
1914 YEAR BOOK RECEIVED
WELL AT THE FIRST SALE
The 1914 Michiganensian met with a
hearty demand' yesterday afternoon,
more than 600 of the books being sold.
This leaves only 600 more to be offered
to the public as the total number of
copies printed this year is 1200. The
annuals may be purchased at the tents
today and tomorrow at any time be-
tween 8:00 and 5:00 o'clock. After
tomorrow the sale will be conducted
by the book stores on State street. The
annual contains about 15 more pages
than that of last year and is distin-
guished by several new features in
contents, arrangement and decoration.

M'NAMARA WILL.
FEATURE CLUBS'
MUSICAL FEST.
Hadame Schuman-Heink's Protege to
Appear at Combined Concert
For First Time In
Ann Arbor
CALIFORNIANS TO PRESENT
MANY ECCENTRIC "STUNTS"
Tickets Are Now on Sale at 25 and 50
Cents at Wahr's, Sheehan's
and Union
Edward McNamara, protege of Mad-
am Schumann-Heink, will sing at the
"College Vaudeville" entertainment in
Hill auditorium, Saturday evening.
The baritone star, a former policeman
in Patterson, N. J., is reputed to pos-
sess a voice which will soon surpass
that of any singer on the concert stage.
McNamara came here in the fall, and
has since been studying under Prof.
William Howland in the school of mu-
sic, at the same time taking special
work in the university. His participa-
tion in Saturday night's concert, which
is under the direction of the Michigan
Glee and Mandolin club, will be his
only public appearance while In Ann
Arbor.
Turner and Baker, in dialogue and
song, Dick Lyman in a Yukon skit,
together with Rose Gilbert' and his
beauty chorus, are among the top-lin-
ers in the repertoire of the University
of California Glee club, which, with
McNamara, will be featured at the en-
tertainment Saturday. The western-
ers' bill also includes Dick Maddox, in
unusual monologue novelties, and
Howard .Patrick, singer -and composer
of ragtime favorites.
The Panama-Pacific Exposition offi-
cial quartet, composed of California
students, will be starred in popular
numbers. This organization is to be
an attraction at the big San Francis-
co fair next year, when the California
Glee club returns from its second Eu-
ropean tour.
Tickets for Saturday's concert, at 25
and 50 cents, are now on sale at
Wahr's Sheehait's and the Michigan
Union. On account of the addition of
McNamara to the varied program, the
management expects a record-break-
ing crowd. The seat sale to date has
been heavy, although no reserved seats
are offered.
FIRST PLANS FOR
CAP' NIGHT BEGUN
Councilman Herman Trum, general
chairman of the cap night celebration,
which is to be held May 29, on Palmer
field, has appointed 35 sophomores to
canvass the merchants of Ann Arbor,
to secure boxes and barrels for the big
bonfire. A meeting of volunteer sec-
ond year men will be called shortly
at the Union, to organize committees
for collecting the combustibles, caring
for the red-light along the line of
march, and building the fire.
As in the past, the classes of the
different departments will assemble
along the diagonal walk and at 7:00
o'clock the whole body of undergradu-
ates in the university will march to

Sleepy Hollow between rows of red-
fire. The Varsity band will furnish
music for the occasion. A free show
will be given to the new-sophs after
the festivities by the Majestic manage-

hins University.
Orators Meet and Install Officers
J. L. Primrose, '13-'15L, was elected
vice-president of the Northern Orator-
ical league, and the new officers L. H.
Dunten, '14-'16L, president, W. M.
Brucker, '16L, secretary, and L. V. By-
bee, '16, treasurer, were installed, at
the meeting of the Oratorical associa-
tion, yesterday.

years,
Y. w. C. A. Collects Old Rubbers
A box to be filled with old rubbers
has been placed on the William street
porch of the Y. W. C. A. by the Junior
King's Daughters of the Congregation-
al Church. The donated rubbers will
be sold and the proceeds used towards
buying playground apparatus for Ann
Arbor schools.j

Pa Igean of Jean --dA-
Ferry Field, Thursday Evening, May 21, 7:30
COURT DANCES - PEASANT DANCES - CAST OF 400
Seats on sale Main Corridor, University Hall
orridCr PRICES t$ 1.OO ; 75c; 50c.

ment.

- --. ,

-_

25c Seats Now
CAL
COLLEG]
SATURDAY EVENING

Selling at Wahr's and Sheehvdn '
IFORNIA AND MICHIGAN MUSICAL CLUBS IN

50c

V

AUDEVILLE

I

rot Weather Specielties

HILL AUD TOR. VM

.

p__

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