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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 17, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

ESTABLISHED 1818
rlittrt'falt b
BROADWAY CoR.TWENTY-SECOND 3'
N.W YORK~.
Our representative, Mr. Walker,
willI.be at
The Ponchartrain, Detroit,
Monday and Tuesday
with
Flannels for Town and Country
Summer Furnishings
Straw and Panama Hats
Russia Calf and Buckskin Shoes
Travelling Kits

BOSoN BRANcH;
149 Tremont Street

NEWPORT BRANCH:
220 Bellevue Avenue

Your Summer Vacation
can mean profit as well as
pleasure to you
The Outlook Company'
is desirous of securing a limited number
of college men as exclusive representa-
tives to secure subscriptions during the.
summer months.
The Outlook is a recognized au-
thority on current events and appeals
only to the educated, intelligent class of
people. You can secure subscriptions
from your own circle of acquaintances.
The work is pleasant and the remu-
neration attractive.
Write us to-day for full particulars about our college
men's agency plan. Address the Treasurer,
THE OUTLOOK COMPANY
281 Fourth Avenue, New York

CLUB'S BOOKLETS
CREATEINTEREST
About 150 letters have been recived
by the Commerce club in answer to the
booklets which were sent to the busi-
nesshouses of the country, in the in-
terests of the graduating members of
the Business Administration depart-
ment. Of this number 100 are favor-
able to the employment of students.
The general auditor of the American
Telegraph and Telephone company
was in Ann Arbor last week, at which
time he made arrangements to employ
six students who will graduate in June.
There are between 35 and.40 positions
listed with the employment committee
at the present time and the list will be
opened to all of the senior class within
a short time.
NO APPLICATIONS TO SUMMER
MILITARY CAMP MADE AS YET.
Although many inquiries have been
received by Prof. L. M. Gram, pf the
engineering department, concerning
the summer military camp to be es-
tablished by the United States Army at
Ludington during July, no applications
for admission have been handed in as
yet. Much interest has been mani-
fested in the project, and Professor
Gram expects applications to come in
within a few days.,
The workings of the camp were ex-
plained last week at an address in
University hall by Captain George H.,
Shelton. The course will consist of a
five-weeks training in military tactics,
and the essentials of army life in the
field.
SENIOR ENGINEERS TO WEAR
("LAPS AM)T GOWNS AT ANNUAL.
The senior engineers will hold their
formal dance Friday, May 29, after the
cap night celebration. The seniors will
go directly from the freshmen celebra-
tion to the dance and will wear their
caps and gowns during the grand
march. The party will be featured
throughout with several novelties to be
furnished by the electrical and mechan-
ical engineers. Tickets will go on sale
todafy and will be limited in number to
100.
CA OISTS ;ADOPT WHISTLES
TO AVOID RIVER ACCIDENTS
Canoeists on the river have adopted a
system of whistles for us4 in passing
one another. There were several near
collisions Sunday afternoon and even-
ing. The scheme which was adopted
by some, and which is recommended
by the Union Boat club, is to give one
lopg whistle, if the intent is to pass on
the right, and two whistles if on the
left.

SCIENTISTS PLAN
FINE EQUIPMENT
The new science building, upon
which work will be started as soon as
the psychology building is removed,
will be one of the best arranged and
finest equipped in the country, accord-
ing to expert opinion.
The building will be rectangular in
shape, truncated at the southwest cor-
ner by the diagonal walk. It will ex-
tend from the diagonal walk to north
University avenue, a distance of 278
ft., and in width, the average dimen-
sions are 254 ft. In general appear-
ance the structure will resemble the
chemistry building, being four stories
in height and constructed of similar
material. The two main entrances will
be on the north and the east sides,
while two smaller entrances will open
onto the diagonal walk.
Two parallel rowsof rooms, separ-
ated by a corridor, will be found on
each floor. The inner row will look
onto a courtyard, which will be fur-
nished with grass plots. A general
lecture room will be located on the
second floor, along the diagonal walk.
Above the lecture room, the science li-
brary, which will be fitted with all
modern appliances, will be located.
The departments, which will be
housed in the new building, are the
psychology, forestry, botany, zoology,
mineralogy and geology. The contract
specifies that work must be completed
by May 1, 1915.
DETROIT CONCERNS WANT MEN
FOR PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT.
Two more companies in Detroit have
asked the University Y. M. C. A., to
supply them with student employees.
The Ford Auto Co. wants graduate en-
gineers to work in their efficiecy en-
gineering department. Parke, Davis
Co., one of the largest drug companies
in the United States; wants either grad-
uates or student medics or chemists
who will contract to remain with them
at least one year.
Frank Olmstead, '15, the employment
secretary of the Y. M. C. A., wvent to
Detroit Thursday and interested a
number of the large automobile firms
in using students for the summer and
will probably have a number of po-
sitions within a week.
Historical Association Offers Prize.
The American Historical Association
will award a prize of $200 for the best
unpublished monograph in military
history submitted before September 1,
1915. The length of the monographs
is limited to 100,000 words. Captain A.
L. Conger, Army Service Schools, Fort
Leavenworth, Kansas, has charge of
the applications.

NEW HISTORY COURSE ADDED
TO CURRICULUM NEXT YEAR.
In addition to the two introductory
courses, which are now used in the
history department, one in Modern
European History, : and the other in
English History, a third course, in
Ancient History, will be established
next fall. This course will be in charge
of Dr. Arthur E. Boak, who has just
been appointed as instructor in An-
cient History, and will give four hours
credit. Dr. Boak is a graduate of
Queens University, Ontario, and after
studying Ancient History for two years
at Harvard University, went to Europe
as a traveling Fellow in order to do
research work. Dr. Boak studied at
the University of Berlin.
Mexican Resident Will Speak Here.
J. U. Escobar, of Mexico, will speak
before the Latin American students
May 23 and 24. Mr. Escobar has been
in Mexico for a number of years in
the Y. M. C. A. work and is coming
here to interest the Spanish speaking
students in the Y. M. C. A. conference
which will be held at Lake Geneva,
Wis., in. June.
Law Fraternity is Building New House
Phi Delta Phi, law fraternity, is
building a new home on the corner of
Madison and Thompson streets. Work
on the excavation has just commenced,
and the house will be ready for occu-
pancy about next Christmas.
New Forms Are Assembled for Stadium
Work on the new stadium at Ferry
Field is progressing on schedule time
in spite of the rainy weather. All the
wooden forms now in place have been
filled with concrete and new forms are
now being assembled.

A ONE

To stimulate interest in the possibil-
ities of action picture play writing,
Thomas A. Edison, Inc., are offering a
prize of $100 for the best play submit-
ted before December 1st, 1914.
Only a few years ago, motion picture
plots were thrown together with a
blissful disregard for the most ele-
mental principles of dramatic con-
struction. Today, with the widespread
growth and development of the indus-
try, such haphazard methods .are no
longer practicable. The public, at one
time content with the astounding fact
that the pictures really moved, has out-
lived its excitement over the novelty,
and demands an excellence of dramatic
attainment equalling that of the regu-
lar stage.
The education of the popular taste
has naturally resulted in a demand for
plays of real intrinsic merit. Many
authors and playwrights who formerly
wrote exclusively for the magazines
and the stage, are devoting their atten-
tion more and more to the motion pic-
ture field. At the present time there is
hardly an author on either side of the
Atlantic, the motion picture rights of
whose works are not either sold, or in
the market. a
The Edison Company believes that
there is a distinct future for men of
collegiate training in this field. It is
largely for the purpose of getting in
touch with any students who share
their views -that this contest has been
instituted.
Each scenaric submitted will be paid
'for imnmediatply if. accepted. The $100
prize is an additional bonus and will
be awarded January 1st, 1915.
Full particulars of the contest may
be found (Bulletin boards on which
our notice is posted). Adv.

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MONDAYMAY 18
HARRISON CREY FISKE PRESENTS
MA IL PRICES
ORDERS
N 0 Z.oo
AND THE MANHATTAN COMPANY
-11NA-
MRS. DUMPSTEA-LEIOH
An' American Comedy by HARRY JAMES SMITH

1

I' 'iI

TRAD. MARh
100.00 Cas ne

q THOMAS A. EDISON, Inc., offer
$100.00 for the best motion picture
scenario submitted by a student in
any department of this University.
i In addition, all scenarios suitable
to the requirements of the Com.
pany will be purchased and paid
for immediately upon acceptanc-
f Enter now-write Thomas A. Edison, Inc.
at address below for further particulars.

It is no disgrace to
save yourself time
and trouble if you do not sacri-
fice the quality of your work.
Use an Electric FlatIron
andcompare its work with that
of the old fashioned sad iron;
compare, also, the time spent
and your own state of mind
and body. You will be con-
vinced that you cannot afford
to do without an
Electric Flat Iron
Let us provide you with one.
The
Eastern Michigan Edison Co.
r1ain and William
Phone 2300

L.,

MAJESTIC
REMEMBER! new policy starts next
Monday Matinee. The finest and best
Photo Dramas ever seen In this city.
Complete MfNIAVS QT UIDIAV
Change Program M lO OY i &TURSDAYS
EACH SHOW LASTS ABOUT 2 HOURS
Matinees daily 3 O'clock
Two Shows Nightly 7 and 9 P. M.
The World's greatest Photo Plays here every week

MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY

Ma18-1920 Matines
Nights

CHARLES DICKENS'
"DAVID COPPERFIELD"
In parts and 500 scenes
$50,040 Motion Picture of This Novel

THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
"THE

May 21-22=23 Maines
-Famous Daly Theatre Success-
GREAT DIAMOND ROBBERY"
In 7 parts and 200.scenes

'he College Prize Contest Dept.
THOMAS A. EDISON, Inc.
2826 DECATUR AVENUE
BEDFORD PARK, N. Y.

with acast of famous stars including Wallace Eddinger, Ethel Proctor Otis,etc
Adults 15c-Children 1Oc'es.EA.TS25

I

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