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May 17, 1914 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-17

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The

Michigan

Daily

Vol. XXIV, No. 162. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNNDAY, MAY 17, 1914. PRICE FIVE CENTS

VARSITY WIPE
FARMER SLATE,
PARTLY CLEAN
Michigan Shuts Out Aggie Nine and
Pounds Dodge, Former Victor,
For Eleven Hits and
Six Runs
FERGUS# (ETS OUT OF TWO
HOLES AND SMOTHERS RALLY
Lundgren's Men Work Double Squeeze
in Ninth, When Five Hits
Net Four Runs
Revenge is sweet!
The Wolverine, tracked to his lair
and soundly beaten by the Farmers
last fall, yesterday turned the tables,
penetrating to the heart of the agri-
cultural regions and playing havoc
with the crop of athletes on which the
Farmers had based their hopes for
continued prosperity. The score-
Michigan 6, M. A. C. 0.
But there was more than the partial
erasure of a gridiron defeat in yester-
day's triumph, for the Aggie pitcher
who was so carefully groomed to hum-
ble the Wolverines had twice turned
the trick two seasons ago. Last year
the Varsity thrice humbled the Farmer,
but Captain Bell's men had no opportu-
nity to revenge themselves on Mr.
Dodge.
Saturday, however, the port side art-
ist, famed in agricultural history for
taming the Wolverines, was literally
battered to pieces. Eleven tines the
Michigan batters landed on his slants
for safe hits, and only reckless base
running kept the count down.
When the game started the bleachers!
were in a flutter of excitement won-
dering why Michigan was not going to
pitch, Sisler in s important a contest,
but before the contest was over the'
home crowd was thoroughly supplied
with reasons.
i Ferguson, Lundgren's selection for;
yesterday, got himself in two bad holesI
early in the game. In fact, the cheer-
ing and band seemed justified for a
while, but as time went on "Fergy",
gradually improved, until at the end
of the game he had the Aggies com-
pletely at his mercy. He yielded buti
four hits.
There were just two bad innings for
the Michigan twirler, but as these were
the first and fourth it looked like a;
real ball game for some time. In all
the other rounds but three Aggie bat-
ters came to the plate. Michigan, on
the other hand, went down in one-two-
thre order for the first three rounds.
After Michigan was retired in the
first, Chilton singled to start the Ag-
gie attack, Fick sacrificed him to sec-
ond, and Ferguson walked Fuller, and
advanced both runners on a balk. WithI
men on third and. second and one out
things did not look auspicious for the
Wolverines, but Hughitt camped underI
Dodge's foul and Baer threw out L.
Chilton on a bunt.
There was no thrill In the second,1
but in the third Michigan pulled somec
weird playing. Howard hit with one
down. McQueen lined to right field,
Howard scoring, but ground rules were
applied, and Howard was called back
to third and McQueen sent back to sec-
ond. Sisler lifted a perfect sacrifice
fly to left, but Howard neglected to
hold his base until the ball was caught,
and was easily retired at the plate.,
- In the fourth the Aggies got nasty
again, and coming so soon after theI

Michigan billiard exhibition, things
looked dark. Fuller walked and took
third on Dodge's single. Howard's
play evidently appealed to Fuller, how-
ever, and the latter proceeded to assas-
(Continued on page 6.)

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Dr. Ches'ter Emerson speaks at Con-
gregational church, 7:45 o'clock.
Mr. Leonard. A. Barrett speaks at the
First Presbyterian church, 104:30
o'clock.
Menorah society will meet in Newber-
ry hill, 7:30 o'clock.
Dr. Chester Emerson speaks at Con-
gregational church, 7:45 o'clock.
Mr. Leonard A. Barrett speaks at the
First Presbyterian church, 1030
c'clock.
Menorah society will meet in Newber-
ry hall, 8:00 o'clock.

SOPHS VICTORS
42 IN ANNUAL
SPRING BATTLE
Second Year lien Easily Win Obstacles
Races But Lose Push Ball
Combat in Hard
Fight
N EA H HN ORS OUTNUMBERED
200 BY YEARLING FIGHTERS

KOONTZ VOTED
TO HEAD UNION
IN CLOSE RACE
Koontz, Foote, and Schroeder Make
hard Fight for 1914-15 Presidency
in Annual Election
Yesterday
ONLY 308 VOTES CAST THIS
YEAR; 491 IN LAST ELECTION

Rabbi Tobias Schanfarber speaks
Orpheum theater, 7:00 o'clock.
MICHI1GAN NINE

in I

Lose Last Scrap Only Because Ball McKinney Recording Secretary; Gault,
Was in Their Territory When Baxter, Saier, Curry McDonald,
Time Expired Vice-Presidents
By winning the three relay races Patrick D. Koontz, '14, was chosen
yesterday morning from the freshmen, president of the Michigan Union for
the year 1914-15 at the annual elec-
and losing the pushball contest, the tion yesterday, with a plurality of four
sophs defeated the freshmen by a score votes over Marshall Foote, '14. Koontz
of 3 to 1 in the annual underclass received 116 votes against 112 for
spring scrap at Ferry field yesterday votes and 69 were polled
for Karl Mohr, '15L. The total number
morning. Counting the tie score 1 to 1, of votes cast was 308 in comparison to
made in the tug-of-war battles on the the total of 491 last year.
previous day, the total score for the Francis F. McKinney, '16L, led the
spring games shows the sophs to be on race for recording secretary with 144
fnA votes, while Harold Abbott, '15E, in

ENTRAINS FOR
EASTERN TRIP

Wolverine Tossers, With

Wonderful1

Record to Uphold, Leave This
Evening on Long Jaunt
to Seaboard

STUDENTS PLA N A SEN)D-OFF
WHEN VARSITY STARTS OUT

Five Pitchers, Two Catchers,
Infielders and Three Fly
Chasers Will (o

Four

Coach Lundgren and Captain Sisler
will tonight lead the greatest nine that
ever wore the Maize and Blue on the
annual invasion of the east. The team
leaves with a record of 15 intercolle-
giate victories to one solitary defeat,
and among the scatps hanging at the
Wolverine belt are eight shut-out bat-
tles. Michigan has scored 112 runs to
26 foi- her opponents this year, and in
the last 81 innings but three scores
have been made at her expense.
The Varsity, fourteen players strong,
will leave this evening at 9:30 o'clock
via the 'Michigan Central; and a mon-
ster send-off is being planned by the
students, who are looking for the team
to continue its run of 11 straight vic-
tories.
The schedule for the trip, however,
is a difficult one, and several of the
strongest teams in the east will be
met. The Michigan dates follow:
Monday, May 18-Syracuse.
Tuesday, May 19-Syracuse.
Wednesday, May 20-Cornell.
Thursday, May 21-Princeton.
Friday, May 22-Swarthmore.
Saturday, May 23-Pennsylvania.
Coach Lundgren last night selected
the men whom he will take east. Five
pitchers, two catchers, four infielders,
and three outfielders are on the list,
which follows: Captain Sisler, Bari-
beau, Quaintance, Ferguson, Davidson,
Baer, Hippler,' Howard, McQueen, Ba-
ker, Hughitt, Labadie, Sheehy, and
Benton. The team will leave in a spe-
cial sleeper, which will be ready at
9:00 o'clock, and attached later to the
9:30 train.
FIRST MICHIGANENSIANS
SHOULD APPEAR TOMORROW
As the printers of the 1914 Mich-
iganensian have reported no further
delay, it is probable that the yearbook
will be offered to the campus tomor-
row morning. Managing Editor J. 1.
Lippincott, '14, telegraphed yesterday
afternoon in order to obtain definite in-
formation as to the shipment of the
books, but up to late' last night it could
not be ascertained whether or not he
had received an answer.

cop o ag to z score. j
The contests yesterday morning were
interesting, but not spectacular. The
first soph runner in the first relay race
started ahead of his verdant rival, and
for every foot of the way during the
three races, the fresh runners were
behind. Officials at first thought that
only 15 sophs had run in the first race,
but after a discussion, the race was
officially awardled to the second year
men.
Outnumbered by about 200 the 300
near juniors put up a stubborn fight
in the pushball combat, and lost only
because the ball wash in their territory
when Referee Miller Pontius fired the
closing shot.
WVESLEYAN TAKES WOLVERINE'S
ME;ASURE ON TENNIS COURTS'
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
MIDDLETOWN, CONN., May 16.-
Michigan's tennis team lost 5 matches
out of 6 here today to Wesleyan, the
intercollegiate champions of New Eng-
land. The Wolverines' sole score was
registered by Wilson and Reindel in
one of the two doubles matches. The
results follow:
Doubles-Wilson and Reindel defeat-'
ed Rowell and Richards, 6-2, 7-5;
Clark and Hoffman defeated Andrews
and Hall, 6-1, 6-3. Singles-Rowell
defeated Wilson 6-1, 6-2, 13-11 ;
Richards defeated Hall, 6-2, 6-4;
Clark defeated Andrews, 4-6, 6-1,
6-3; Hoffman defeated Reindel, 7-5,
7-5.

second place garnered a total of 135.
Chester Lang, '15, was third with 112.
Harry Gault, '15, was elected lit vice-
president with 94 ballots; 49 were poll-
ed for Carlton Jenks, '15, and William
B. Thom, '15, received 44. Kenneth
Baxter, '15E, will occupy the engineer-
ing vice-presidency. He netted 31.votes
over Allan T. Ricketts, '15E, and Hen-
ry Parsons, '15E, who received 21 and
17'respectively. Edward H. Saier, '15L,
was elected law vice-president, being
the only candidate in the field. George
J. Curry, '15M, received ten votes for
the medic vice-presidency, Maurice
Lobman, '15M, garnering eight. In the
combined departments, Frank McDon-
aid, '15D, received the position, Carl
P. Field. '15P, and Hf.. J. Caulkins fol-
lowing with 2 votes each.
Dean Henry M. Bates, Dr. Reuben
IPeterson and Prof. Herbert C. Sadler
were elected faculty representatives.
Students to Travel for Motor Concern
A representative of the Maxwell Mo-
tor Company, of Detroit will be at the
University Y. M. C. A. Tuesday to en-
gage 50 students as traveling agents in
the United State and Candada. The
men will receiv $50 to $60 per month
with an allowance for traveling ex-
penses. The company's representative
will meet all who apply for positions
in the association's office at 7:00
o'clock.
Dr. Burnett Is Honored by Society
Dr. Claude A. Burrett, registrar of
the homeopathic department,was elect-
ed president of the Homeopathic Med-
ical Society of Michigan at its annual
meeting in Saginaw Wednesday.

TICKETS FOR JEANNE D'ARC
PAGEANT ON' SALE XONDIAY
Members of the Cast, Committees,
and Faculty to Be Given First
Chance to Purchase
Tickets for the Jeanne d'rc pag-
eant will be sold Monday morning in
the corridor of University hall to the
following persons: members of the cast
and committees, and to the faculty.
The mail orders came in greater num-
bers than was expected and the pros-
pect of a large attendance is good.
Choruses of the courtiers,-peasants,
and "children" were held yesterday,
final touches being applied in view of
the short time remaining before the
production Thursday evening. This af-
ternoon the entire cast will hold re-
hearsals at the Union according to
Professor Kenyon.
CLOSING CONCERT
SCORES SUCCESS
Artists Appear to Advantage in Their
Different Roles; Chorus Work
.Lacks Volume
ORGAN EXECUTION IS BRILLIANT
As a fitting final climax to a brilliant
series of concerts, Elgar's "Caracta-
cus," was given last night for the sec-
ond time in the history of Ann Arbor
May festivals. The score bristles with
bold, enervating melodies, and interest
is constantly kept alive by its whole-
some dramatic energy, its brilliant
climaxes and contrasts, and by a well-
planned succession of soli, duets, trios,
and chorus numbers.-
Miss Florence Hinkle, sang the role'
of Elgen, with a voice of remarkable
clarity and sweetness, and yet an
abundance of power. The part of Car-
actacus was taken by Rein ald Werren-
rath. While Mr. Werrenrath's voice is
of a splendid rich quality, it lacked
requisite power for the role. Henri
Scott, in a triple role, sang with much
elegance, poise, and dramatic force.
Lambert Murphy, as Orbin, gave a very
pleasing interpretation.
While as a whole the work of the
chorus was commendable, it lacked a
sense of security, and failed to give out
the volume of tone which the many
climaxes of the work demand.
In the afternoon concert, Mr. Earl
Moore, presented the "Great G minor
Fugue" by Bach, and the Sixth Sym-
phony of Widor. These were executei
(Continued on page 6.)
RECKLESS DRIVER
INJURES STUDENT
C. R. Osborne, '16, Sustains Sprained
Ankle and Severe Nervous
Shock
An automobile, bearing the number,
Mich. 15384, while coming down south
State street yesterday afternoon after
the Syracuse track meet,'attempted toa
turn east up Hill street through the
crowds of people returning from the
mueet, and struck C. R. Osborne, '16,
straining his ankle and giving him. a
severe nervous shock, and at the same;
time endangering the lives of severall
men and women who were on the
crossing.
The action of the driver of the car
is reported by witnesses to have been
deplorable. He brought his machine
to a stop several yards from the cross-
ing, and then, after looking out and

seeing that the crowd had helped his
victim to his feet, drove up Hill street
paying no attention to the repeated
calls from those present asking that
he take the injured man to his home.

.E

From First Event, Michiganders £giu
to Pile Up Huge Total Against
Feeble Efforts of
Methodists
JANSEN LOWERS HAFF'S MARK
IN 880 BATTLE WITH TAYLOR
Ufer Makes Great Vinish in Mile Run
Nosing Out Plummer in Last
Few Yards
Michigan's track athletes "came
back" from the heavy Cornell defeat,
by trouncing Syracuse with a landslide
of points that resulted in a score of 85
to 35, yesterday afternoon on Ferry
field. Races won by hairbreadth mar-
gins, and fast time characterized the
meet.
From the outset the tide of victory
flowed steadily toward the Wolverine,
and when the mile relay rang the cur-
tain on the slaughter, eleven firsts, and
slams in two events, capped the tri-
umph.
Bond won the century sprint, but the
judges were unable to see daylight be-
tween him and "Howdy" Seward, while
Smith Followed a yard behind with a
big gap between him and Bowser, the
much touted colored filer from the
East. In the 220 yard dash, Bond and
Seward decided to lay down the tom-
hawk between them and ended in a
dead heat.
True to his antebellum prediction,
Trainer Farrell sprang a bagful of sur-
prises yesterday. The first was flashed
when Plummer, an erstwhile quarter
miler, led the field in the mile for three
laps by a 20 yard distance. Ufer with
a burst of speed and evidence of en-
durance that brought the fans to their
feet, swung up from behind on the
home stretch, and nosed this latest
find out of first place by a margin of
indhes.
The second surprise was unleashed
when Murphy swept into view from be-
hind the stands with the quarter mile
bunch, and kept in the lead with Ruli-
son the Methodist crack, until the last
few yards, when he was forced to ac-
cept a second.
Jansen won the half mile from Tay-
lor, another Syracuse star, "although
he had to break the Varsity record to
do it. His time of 1 minute 57 3-5 sec-
onds is 1-5 of a second slower than the
mark made by Speiden of Cornell two
weeks back, but tops the record form-
erly held by Haff, last year's track
captain, by 1-5 of a second.
Smith vindicated Trainer Farrell's
judgment in switching him from the
two twenty dash, by breaking the tape
before Delling of Syracuse had hurled
the last obstacle. Brown proved him-
self a "come back" in the way of track
performances yesterday afternoon.
This former half mile star has not
been able to run in his old 'form all
year, but changed to the broad jump
and found his bent there, as was shown
by the jump of 22 feet 1 inch which
gave him first honors.
In the pole vault Cross upset the
dope by winning a first, and Phelps
and Quail did the same in the shot and
hammer by capturing, second and third.
The shot put was a slam for the Mich-
iganders, and in the hammer Kohler
made the best throw he has to his cred-
it for the season.
The mile relay furnished a finish to
the meet as exciting as the beginning,
when Murphy who carried the baton
last for Michigan, came up from behind
the Methodist runner, and nailed the
last event to the Wolverine flag.
100 yard dash-Bond (M) first, Sew-
(Continued on page 6.)

FARRELL HOST
SWAMP ORANGE

N DUAL MEET

Now Watch Them Bloom! What?Why
The Season's New Straws Naturally
Official Straw Hat Day has come and 'such wit has no place here. But now
gone. A goodly number of people that the ban on lightweight dips has
heeded the seductive call of Damsel been removed, any person, regardless
Fashion and appeared beneath some of age, color or sex can appear with
form of a straw hat. The humorist impunity. The streets are safe to those
says that May 16 should have been offi- who wish to be modish. Now watch
cially designated Resurrection Day, but 'em bloom!

PRESBYTERIAN Cor. Division
and Huron Sts.
REv. LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister.
ROY HAMILTON, Student Pastor

10:30
12:00
6:30

"Man's Place in God's World."
Univorsity Class led by Roy W. Hamilton.
Christian Endeavor Service.

...............

IF

rr

Uno-ul Congrega

Union Guild
Series
SUNDAY MAY 17, 1914

Dr.

Chester

Emerson

Congrega-
tional Church
7:45 P. M.

Pastor of North Woodward Avenue
Congregational Church of Detroit

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