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May 15, 1914 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-15

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ie

Michigan

Daily

Vol. XXIV. No. 160.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 1914.

PRICE FIVE Cl

T

CHORUS WITH
PROF, STANLEY
WINS TRIUMPH

Second Concert of Nay Festival
Another Brilliant Performance,
With All Artists
Satisfying

Is

EVENTS FOR TODAYI
Engineering exhibit, old and new engi-
neering and chemistry buildings,
9:00 to 12:00; 1:00 to 5:00; 7:00 to
10:00 o'clock.
Third May Festival concert, Riccardo
Martin, Hill auditorium, 2:30 o'clock.
FourthtMay Festival concert, Pasquale
Amato, baritone, 11111 auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.
Indiana club smoker, Michigan Union,
7:00 o'clock.
Fresh-Soph tug of war 4:15 o'clock,
Huron river.
Indiana Men Hold Smoker Tomorrow
Indiana club will hold a smoker and
Varsity band concert, band stand, on
the campus, 6:45 o'clock.
Weekly Lounger, Michigan Union, 7:00
o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

SMILER STATES STRAWS SURE I
TO SEND SHOWERS SATURDAY

FEMALE SOLOISTS SURPASSED
BY MALES IN VOICE QUALITY
Choral Union Shows. iffect of Their
Trainer's Careful Tutoring ''
and Conducting
Handel's "Messiah,-' the best known
ahd most admired of all oratorios
formed the subject of the second con-

Ann Arbor merchants make the offi-
cial announcement that, since the first
announcement. of Official Straw Hat
Day, over "400" straw dips have passed
across their counters and that over
$800 have passed over these counters,
but in the opposite direction. - This is
an indication that big things will be
brewing on Ma'y 16; for tho official
sleuth and archaeologist of the staff
has gone through the hidden chambers]
of sundry students and reports that
oodles of straw hats are lying in their
dark cocoons, awaiting the gentle call
of public opinion to blossom forth on
the gay avenues.
This story should should be written
by a necromancer or a soothsayer, The
author should be endowed with the
divine powers of glancing into the fu-
ture, and visualizihg the gala scene on
May 16. He should possess the
ability to see straw hats of ;v1ry

shape, kind, brand, color, height, price,
age and previous condition of servi-
tude. He should be able to cast sup-
posedly witty and humorous aspersions
on those persons whom he knows will
not appear 0. K.'d by Dame Fashion.
He should be able to draw a pulsating
and living picture of the gala mob
crowding about the election booths at
the Union, of the multitudes forcing
their way into Hill auditorium, of the
sea of humanity on the grandstand at
the Syracuse meet, and of the convuls-
ed, yet tensely interested mass of peo-
ple on the banks of the Huron-all in.
straw headgear.
But the author is not a necromancer
or a soothsayer, he is a prosaic pessi-
mist. And in spite of the promises of
the weatherman, in spite of his per-
sonal high hopes of being able to join
the merry straw hat throng, he sighs
deeply and--predicts rain.

* U*.-*F

M CONTEST.

Time-4:15 o'clock sharp, Fri-
day.
Place-Huron river, below Mich-
igan Central freight depot.
Referees-Arthur Kohler,George
Paterson, James Raynesford.
Officials-Student councilmen
and "M" men.
TUG-.OF-'AR RULES.
1. Three contests, each to
count one point.
2. Footholds to be dug with
heels only, and not until signal
is given.
3. No metal cleats allowed.
4. Only anchor 'man to wind
rope around body.
5. Team succeeding in pull-
ing flag to touch its side of river
to be the winner.
6. Each team to be composed
of 45 men.
* * * *~ * * * * * * *

R *
*t
*
M*
*,
:k
{
*
*
T
K*J

huge Crowd, Fxceeding That of
Year by 1,000, Views Exhibit
Trnder Student
Guidacee

ENGINEERS ARE'
HOSTS TO 1011

ON FIRST

IQuk I'd'

I3

OF LQ AID 11tI
fVERiATi) BY("IME

*
*
*
*
*

Trip to New Power house and Foundry
Work Will Feature Today's
Exhibition
With the automatic register record-
ing 7,911 visitors passing through the
doors of the engineering building, the
second annual engineering exhibit end-
ed a successful day at 9:00 o'clock last
night. The number of spectators during

cert of the festival series given last
night. This oratorio consisted origi-
nally of fifty-seven numbers, but ow-
ing to its unusual length, it was re-
duced by omitting eighteen of the les-
ser divisions.
Of the work of the soloists, the male
voices easily surpassed the female. Es-
pecially deserving of praise is Henri
Scott, the bass, whose breadth of style,
technical command, and perfect famili-
arity with the score, insured a most
adequate and satisfactory rendition of
his difficult role. Hardly less admir-
able was tle work of Lambert Murphy,
tenor, wh6se rich, ringing voice was
especially convincing in the opening
recitative, "Comfort Ye, My People,"
and the following aria, "Every Valley."'
Margaret Keyes appeared to advantage
in the air, "He was Despised," while
Inez Barbour delighted her audience
by her clear and flexible voice through-
out the work.
The corus appeared to be unusually
well trained, reflecting great credit up-
on Mr. Stanley, whose conducting was
at all times marked by broad, intelli-
gent musicianship.
During the performance of the fam-
ous "Hallelujah Chorus," Mr. Stanley
requested the audience to rise ir defer-
ence to a tradition started in England
by the King, when it was first perform-
ed in London.
The long sustained, fortissimo pas-
sages were reinforced with splendid
effect by organ parts, while the orches-
tra which was the backbone of the
whole performance left nothing to be
desired. On the whole,- last night's
performance of this magnificent hymn
of rejoicing was entirely adequate. i
* , * * * * * * * * *
* NOMINATIONS FOR MICHIGAN.. *
UNION OFFICERS 1914-1915 *
* Polls-Union, Saturday, May 14, *
* 9:00 to 1:00 o'clock. *
* - -0- *
* President-P. Duffy Koontz, '14; *1
* W. W. Schroeder, '14; Mar- *
* shall W. Foote, '14; Karl J. *3
* Mohr, '13-'15L. *
* Recording Secretary-H. B. Ab- *
* bott, '15E, Chester H.,Lang, '15, *
* F. F. McKinney, '16L. *
* Lit vice-President-H. G. Gault, *1
* '15, C. H. Jenks, '15, W. B. *
* Thorn, '15. .*
* Engineering Vice-President-K. '*
* S. Baxter, '15E, H. S. Parsons, *7
* '15E, A. T. Ricketts, '15E. *
* Law Vice-President-E.H. Saler, *
* '5L. *
* Combined Departments-C. P. *
* Field, '15P, F. W. McDonald, *]
* '15D, H. J. Caulkins, '16.*.
* Faculty Representatives-Dean *
* U. M. Bates, Prof. R. Peterson, *
"' Prof. H. C. Sadler. *
* * * * * * * 4 * * *

Fifth May Festival Concert, Inez Bar-
bour, Soprano, Hill auditorium, 2:30
o'clock.
Syracuse-Michigan track meet, Ferry
field, 3:00 o'clock.
Fresh-Soph relay obstacle races, Ferry
field, 9:30 o'clock.
Fresh-Soph pushball contest, Ferry
field, after the relay races.
Sixth May Festival concert, Hill audi-
torium, 8:00 o'clock.
Michigan Union elections, Michigan
Union, 9:00 to 1:00 o'clock.
Michigan Union Boat club dance, Mich-
igan Union, 8:30 o'clock.
UNDERCIASSES
BATTLE TODAYUON
Rushing Stream Is Out of Banks, and
Spectators Will See Unusually
Spectacular Struggles
This Afternoon
FEW SOPHOMORES TURN OUT.
TO AROUSE FIGHTING B3LOOJ)
Lack of Men on' Second Year Teams
Necessitates Final -Weighing
in This Afternoon
With the usually placid Huron river
transformed into a muddy torrent by
the recent rains, onlookers will see un-
usually spectacular contests at the.an-
nual fresh-soph tug-of-war struggles
scheduled to begin at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon, across the river just below
the Michigan Central freight station.
Loyal second year men turned out in
disappointingly small numbers last
night at the mass .neeting, but what
they lacked in numbers, they supplied
with "pep'" after hearing rousing talks
by Frank Murphy, Spencer Scott, Louis
Haller, Waldo Fellows, Walter Em-
mons and Edward Saier. As the sophs
are still 15 men short in their heavy-
weight team, and still lack 12 for their
lightweight squad, final weighing in
will be held from 1:00 to 3:00 o'clock
today at the gym to fill the vacancies.
The vacancies in the relay teams will
have to be filled by appointments by
the captains. Lists of all the relay
teams will be posted this noon in the
engineering building, gymnasium and
University hall.
Sophomores' will assemble at 3:00
o'clock this afternoon in front of the
law building, and freshmen will meet
at the flag pole at the same time. The
first tug, the lightweight struggle, will
begin at 4:15 o'clock, and the middle
and heavyweights will fight as soon as
(Continued on page 4)

SELECT* THREE
STUDENTSFO
CONTROL BOARD'
Board of Directors Pick Ed&iard Saieru,
Walter Emmons and I Beach
Carpenter For
Offices
CHOICE FOLLOWS DEFE AT 'OF
DIRE CT ELECTION LPROPOSA L1
Only One of New leniĀ«ers of Board in
Control Is So Numbered on
DIIrectorate
The board of directors of the athletic
association esterday noon leeted 1.
Beach Carpenter, '14, EdWard Saier,
'15L, and Walter Emmons, '14E, as the
three student inembers of the athletic
board in control. This action was tak-
en in accerdance with the vote of the
directorate on Wednesday, at which
time a resolution looking to an attempt
to provide for direct election of these
officers was defeated by the board
members.
But one of the new students on the
board in control'is a member of the
directorate, Walter 'Eniiues holding
his office on this body as the manager
of the Varsity baseball team. Carpen-
ter is a member of the control board
at the present time, having been elect-
(Continued on page 4)

GROOM TRACK
ATHLETES FOR
ORANGE MEET

Firrell Puts Cinder Men Through Last
Hard Drill in Preparation
For Tomorrow's.
Dual lash
COUNT ON SMITH FOR WIN
SN 220-lyARD LOW HURDLES
Vfer Is Expected to Star in Mile Ruin;
Three Dash Men Entered in
Century
Trainer Farrell gave the final groom-
ig to his track charges yesterday
afternoon, in preparation for the an-
nual outdoor dual meet with Syracuse
on Ferry field, Saturday. .
Smith, Bond and Seward will proba-
bly start in the hundred for Michigan,
Saturday, but it is expected that Smith
will be absent from the two twenty
sprint, as he will be saved for the low
hurdles.
Fox is slated to run the two-mile
again and should make a good showing
against the Methodist talent. Ufer is
considered in the light of a find in the
mile run, and is sure to be kept there
by Farrell.

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DELTA SIOMA RHO ADMITS
NE1W MEN TO MIEMBERSHIP
Delta Sigma Rho, national= honorary
oratorical fraternity admitted to mem-
bership last night W. El. Morris, win-
ner of the state peace contest. At a
previous meeting the following men
were taken in: Sylvan S. Grosner, '14L,
Werner W. Schroeder, '14-'16L, Karl
J. Mohr, '13-'15L, Samuel Witting, '15.
The society also affiliated the follow-
ing men: K. M. Stevens, '15L, varsity
debater of Colgate, and J. L. Klengler,
'15, varsity debater of the University
of Colorado.
BALL PLAYERS
LEFOR "AG" CAMP
Battle For Revenge Will Be Staged
on Saturday Morning on
Lansing League
Diamond
LUNDGREN PICKS SQUAD OF
NINETEEN MEN TO MAKE TRIP
Ferguson Scheduled as Probable
Mound Choice; Men Back in
Time For Meet
Coach Carl Lundgren will lead
nineteen Wolverine baseball men to

number that attended the opening day
last year.
The huge crowds were efficiently
handled by a large corps ofstudent
guides who conducted the visitors
through the buildings, explaining the
varfous displays. The number of
guides was not as large as desired,
however, and every junior and senior
engineer not connected withi the exhib-
it is asked .'o report for duty today.
Among the features of yesterday's
exhibit were the moving pictures on
highway constr-uction, a series of il-
lustrated h'cturres by, the foresters and
the various electrical displays. The
wireless sert"iee performed in faultless
style, and messages were sent through-
out the country, In the mechanical
laboratory nearly a quart of liquid air,
with a temperature of 200 degrees
Fahrenheit below zero, was produced.
The miniature electrical railroad
was in operation between tli econom-
ics building and the power plant, and
during the course of the day carried
several thousand daring passengers
around the 350 foot loop. In Prof.
Bailey's office was shown a singing are,
water boiling and freezing at the same
time in the same vessel, and other
scientific phenomena.
A portion of the exhibit which did
not receive the attention from visitors
that the display warranted, was that
of the chemical engineers in the
c h e m i c a 1 building. T h e practi-
cal, as well as the theoretical applica-
tions of chemistry were demonstrated.
Moving pictures of the making of ther-
mite and steel are shown in room '165.
Among the features of today's exhib-
it will be the pouring of moulten metal
in the foundry, and trips to the new
power plant, which will leave room 243
of the engineering building every 15
minutes. Owing to the influx of May
Festival visitors, a. huge crowd is ex-
pected to attend the exhibit today. The
displays will be open to the public un-
.i about 10:00 o'clock tonight.
triangles Initiate Teu Sophomores
Triangles, junior engineer honorary
society, initiated the following ten
sophomores last night, who stood duty
on the triangle in the engineering
arch: John W. Finkeustaedt, Sidney T.
Ste n, Chase 13. Siks, Theren D. Wea-
ver, Edgar D. Crumpacker, Louis B.
Hyde, Dale R. Maltiy, Leland 1j. Ben-
ton, Richard C. Je1 1, and Paiil C.
Wagncr.
nounced last night by Coach Carl
Lundgren: Captain Sisl r, Baribean,
Ferguson, Baer, flippler, Howard, Mc-
Queen, Baker, ughitt, Si'hy, La-
badie, Quainitance, Ren ton, Mattson,
Davidson, Soddy, Wlitz, Graham and
Shivel. '-

the day was larger by 1,000 than

+11

'4
Prof. A.A. Stanley,
who conducted the
performance of Han-
del's "Messiah" last
evening in Hill audi-
torium. The chorus,
composed of 300
voices, has been un-
deg; Professor Stan-
ley's direction since
November. -

Lansing tonight in an invasion which
will mark the first attempt by Wolver-
ine athletes'to avenge last fall's defeat'
on the football gridiron. The Wolver-
ines and Farmers are scheduled to
clash on the Lansing diamond ,on Sat-j
urday morning in the first of a series
of three ball games, the other two of
which are to be played on the Ferry
Field lot.
The game is scheduled to be played
on Saturday morning in the capital in
order that the Michigan men may catch
a train back to Ann Arbor in time to
witness the Syracuse-Michigan track
meet. For this reason the trip to the
Aggies' camp will be made tonight in-
stead of tomorrow morning.
Ferguson will probably be the coach's
choice for mound work. The lanky
youngster has had but a single chance
to show his twisters since the team hit
the Ferry field lot, following the south-
ern trip, and he has saved up all kinds
of speed and curves for use on the
chesty Agriculturists. Baer is sched-
uled to work behind the bat, with Hip-
pIer along as his first aid if necessary.
The regular lineup will probably be
seen in action, unless Captain Sisler
goes into the outfield to help the squad
out with the hitting proclivities.
The following is the squad as an-

SURPASSING
PREVIOUS'

1914

M CH IGAN ENSIAN

on Sale on Campus
NEXT MONDAY

Last year there were
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