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October 16, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-16

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G CONVICTIONS.

ie.

Michigan

Daily

I

POLITICAL HEELERS I
THEM~SELVYES PRINCIP.

Ip

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1913.

No. 15.

PRICE FIVE C

f

4OT GUILTY'
DECISION IN

SALOON CASE

Lawrence J. Damm Discharged When
Jury Returns Verdict After
Being Out For Two
Hours.
LEAVES LIQUOR SITUATION
MUCH THE SAME AS BEFORE
J. H. Miuzey, '16, and Ward Hopkins,
'16, kre Chief Witnesses
For State.
Lawrence J. Damm, the Washington
street saloonist charged with selling
liquor to students last May, was found
"not guilty" by the jury in the circuit
court yesterday afternoon. The trial
ocupied the entire day and the jury
was out for two hours before arriving
at a verdict.
The case was called for trial at nine
o'clock and the task of impnelling the
jury took nearly the entire morning.
J. H. Minzey, '16, the complainant, was
the first witness called. Minzey testi-
fied that he had bought two glasses of
beer for himself in Damm's place, on
the evening of May 20, 1913, and had
also purchased one for Ward Hopkins,
'16. Upon cross-examination by Col.
J. P. Kirk, counsel for the defense,
Minzey refused to admit that he had
made the complaint against Damm un-
der compulsion, although Kirk tried
to establish such a motive.
Ward Hopkins, '16, next took the
.stand and his story of the drinking in
DAmm's saloon on the evening of May
20, 1913 was substanti4lly the same
as that told by Iinzey
The defendant was the lest witness
called and he admitted selling the
liquor to Minzey and Igpkins but
stated that he did not know they were
students, No other witnesses were
called and the arguments by the oppos-
ing counsel followed.
Prosecutor Burke stated that the
verdict in this case leaves the liquor
situation in much the same state as it
was before Damm was arrested. The
case will not be appealed.
INFORMAL FRIDAY NIGHTS
ARE SCHEDULED AT UNION.
Prize for Nanle of Custom Is Offered
By Uplon Officials; pFle
q Lpppky Man.
Friday night will be opepved as a
"mixer" at the Michigan Union. This
will begin a series of similar Friday
night gatherings. With no regular
p'ogram, singing lounging, and gener-
al informality will prevail.
'fables ae to be placed in the front
room and, in the dining room, and
lunches may be ordered at any time
during the evening. A name for the
custom will be picked by a contest for
which a class pipe is pffered as a lpie.
I4n'speaking of the matter at the
membership dinner last night, elden
Dickenson, president of the Union, said
that the committee expects to make
the Fridlay night functions similar to
smokers at Dartmouth and other east-
ern colleges.
PHILLIPS EXAMS FOR FRESH
LIT TO BE HELID SATURDAY
Competitive examinatipns for six
Phillips Scholarsips in atin ad
tGreek, for freshmen, Will be held Sat
urday, the time and place to be an-
nounced later. These scholarships
are open only to freshman candidates
for an A.B. degree in the lit depart-
ment. Dean Effinger requests all cn-
didates to report to him before St-
urday morning,
Students, Directory Copy is Overdue.
Part of the copy for the Students'

Directory has already gone to the
press. A few of the organizations have'
not yet sent in their lists and these
delinquents are urged to take care of
the matter at once. With the co-oper-
ation of all concerned the Directory
will be completed about November 15,
more than ten days earlier than last
year.

BOILERS AT POWER PLANT
ARE NOW ALL IN PLACE.
The last of the eight boilers for the
university power plant was put in
place yesterday afternoon, thus com-
pleting one of the most difficult parts
of the entire installation. Each boil-
er has a generating capacity of 400
horse power, the total development
equaling 3,200 horse power as com-
pared with 2,700 horse power furnish-
ed by the present plant. Bricking in
the boilers iwl -commence at once,
while the generators and auxiliary
machinery are expected to be in place
by early spring. Not until the earlyl
part of next summer will the plant be
in complete order as a separate unit.
FRESHMEN TO
ISPLAY FIRST
'PEP TONIGHT
Mass Meeting Planned for 7:00 O'clock
in Physics Lecture Room,
Rules Will Be
Explained.
SOPHS GATHER TOMORROW'
NIGHT FOR SAME PURPOSE.
Student Council Requests That1 B9th
Classes Disband Withlo
Demonstration,
Freshmen of all departments will
crowd themselves into the west phys-
ics lecture room tonight at 7:00 o'clockt
for the first big mass meeting of the
year. The affair will be conducted by
varsity football men, whi will explain1
to the youngsters the intricacies of
the flag rush and cane spree. A cap-!
taint and cheerleaders will be elected
and everything prepared for the tradi-'
tional struggle.
The freshmen are bending 411 their
efforts toward getting put every able
bodied gray-capper, for they realize
that it will only be by well apranged
and concentrated action that they can
break down precedent and return vic-
torious over the sophomores.
Captain George C. Paterson and Mil-
ler Pontius will have charge of the
"pep" generation, Harold Hulbert will
give the student council viewpoint of
the rush, Arthur Kohler, chairman of
the committee will explain the rules
and Carrol Haff will act as cheerlead-
er. Edward Saier will preside over
the meeting.
The student council requests tlbat
after adjournment, the plass Oishbarj
without gmpnstrations of gny liii
and as 1 rewar4 for such conduct
(Continued on page 4.)

MICHIGAN LIBRARY'
LEADS ITS CLASS,
Unii ersity Stacks Hold More Volumes
Than Those of Any Other
State College.

MORE THAN'328,000 BOOKS HERE. NOVICE RACE BEING PLANNED.

CROSS COUNTRY IS
SHOWING RESULTS
Grauman, Young, Shapiro, and Fox
Are Doing Good Work According
to Captain Brown.'

According to the latest available fig-
ures, Michigan has the largest state
university library in the country. The
statistics for the year 1912 show the
Michigan library to contain 305,684 vol-
umes, while Illinois and California
come a close second. Several of the
endowed universities of the east have
larger libraries than the state insti-
tutions. A partial list for the year
1912 is found elsewhere on this page.
The Illinois library has a much
larger annual appropriation than
Michigan and is growing far more
rapidly. At present Michigan's num-
ber of volumes has been increased to
over 328,000. A staff of 20 assistants
is required for their ,care whose sala-
ries amount to $29,980.00.
The library staff has been busy all
summer repairing and replacing books
damaged in the south wing fire last
spring. Librarian Koch estimates that
about 3,000 volumes and periodicals
were damaged or destroyed.
Comedy Club to Hold Tryouts Friday.
Owing to the fact that many students
who wished to try out for member-
ship in the Comedy club were unable
to answer the recent call for tryouts,
the club at a meeting yesterday decid-
ed to hold additional tryouts Friday
afternoon from 4:00 till 5:00 o'clock.
Gordon C. Eldredge, '14, was elected
secretary-treasurer of the club irb
place of Joseph Turpin, '14, who has
withdrawn from the university.

"The work of Grauman, Young,
Shapiro and Fox has been especially
pleasing," announced Captain Brown
of the cross country squad last night,
preparatory to starting on a seven
mile grind with his squad of distance
runners.
"The ability of Grauman, a fresh-
man is particularly commendable,"
continued the captain, "when it is tak-
en into consideration that he is a
youngster."
The four mile novice race which
will probably be staged the first Sat-
urday in November offers unusual in-
ducements as both cups and numer-
als will be awarded to the winners.
This jaunt is planned to be a four mile
affair open to anyone in school at pres-l
ent, regardless of class or department.
Captain Brown has expressed a de-
sire for more candidates and stated
that he believed a larger turnout
would result if the men understood the
conditions which govern the coming
novice race. Wearers' of the C.C.C.
are barred which leaves an open field
to those who as yet are new in the
branch of work here in the University.
Tryouts For Michiganensian Wanted.
Contracts for space in the 113-14
Michiganensian have been sent out to
sororities and fraternities. Opportun-
ities for work on the Michiganensian
are stated to he abundant as the num-
ber of tryouts is unusually small this
year.

VARSITY BAND ASSURED BY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.
Michigan will surely have a regular
Varsity band and probably before the
end of the week, according to Director
P. G. Bartelme. No definite details of
control have yet been decided upon,
although it is practically decided that
the athletic association will have en-
tire control of the organization. The
reorganization committee will agree
on further details within the next few
days.
Fred Lawton Becomes a Father.
A son, weighing nine pounds, was
born to J. Fred Lawton, '11, of De-
troit, last Sunday.
MEMBERS OF
'FIRST DINNER
President Hutchins Receives Ovation
by Crowd of 200 at First
Monthly Gathering
Last Night.
SAYS STUDENTS SHOULD NOT .
NEGLECT SOCIAL RELATIONS
Prof. Bird and Harold Hulbert Give
Talks; Selden Dickenson
Is Toastmaster.
Michigan Union members, faculty
and students, gathered at the Michi-
gan Union last night to the number of
200 at the big 'Welcome Dinner.' Good-
fellowship and honest relations pre-
valled when professors met students
on common ground, as Michigan Unionl
members.
"I believe in the Michigan Union,"l
said Pres. Harry B. Hutchins, "be-
cause it stands for the solidity of
Michigan. Its influence is to bring
faculty and students together. TheI
members of the faculty wish to get'
close to the student body.
"I do not look out on thet student#
body from the summt,' he said, "I
feel that we are en the same level.'
When we get the magnificent building
of which we are dreaming, and which
I do not believe to be so far distant,
I hope to see an even closer relation.
"Every student makes a ndstake,"I
he said, "when he does not come into4
contact with the life ot the university,
especially througo the Michigan Union.
First of al he must study hard but
the setal life which the Michigan Un-
ton and other organizations offer,<
should not be neglected. I hope to see
the day when every student in the
(Continued on page 4.),

SCRUBS SCORE
ONA EGULARS
FOR FIRST TIME
Mc all, Former larvard Player, Pick
Up Fumble on 35 Yard Mark
Carrying Ball Over
The Line.
]EIGHTEEN FIRST STRING
MEN APPEAR IN LINEUI
Pontius Playing at Fullback Score
Twice; Capt. Paterson Kicks
Placement Goal.
Although the Varsity was scored or
for the first time this year in yester
day's mid-week battle with the All
Fresh and scrubs the regulars over
looked this feature in the gratificatioi
of rolling up a total of 31 points, in.
cluding a goal from placement negoti
ated by Paterson on the 42 yard line
McCall, a former Harvard player
made the scrub touchdown when he
scooped Hughitt's fumble late in the
game and ran 35 yards for a score
with Jenks protecting him. The ex
Crimson man then kicked a goal, and
Kennedy's men were vindicated.
Yesterday's lineup gave Michigar
rooters more food for speculation ae
to the identity of the team which wil
face M. A. C. Bentley, one of the in-
jured halfbacks, returned to scrim-
mage yesterday and distinguished him.
self by grabbing a scrub forward pass
and running 25 yards with Pontius foi
interference. Pontius was again at
full in part of the game, and looked
even better than on Tuesday. Twice

STATISTICS OF UNIVE RSITY LIBRARIES.
0-

Volumes Exp, for

Vols. In
InstitutiQn Library
Brown ..... , .. .,.215000
Columbia .....................540338
Cornell. .,....................409700
Harvard{
Johns Hopkins ................166399.
Leland Stanford, Jr............205801
Ohio State ....................117000
Princeton ....................294915
California ...................**2385.Oq
Chicago ....................8135
Illinois ....................212f21
Iowa............. . . . . . 10894'
Michigan.................. 584
Milu.esota ...... ...... 160000
Pennsylvania ......7.. . . .. . 352674
Wisconsin
l. .. ................... 600000

Added
1911-12.
14060
23528
14491
(Figures not
9219
14684
10300
12067
261£1
37689
a9158
82i9
17591
15000
15738
(Figures not:
45933

Books, &c.
1911-12.
$25581.11
48232.47
19878.00
yet received.)
18500.12
33098,11
20000.00
14838.49
3S8O0. QQ
3706,12
56533.00
17700.00'
30000.00
32389.23.
12650.00
yet received.)
32542.00

Approp.
1912-13.
for books
$20743.00
48500.00
24200.00
14000 .00
40375.00
20000.00
*14400,00
3400x,00
37595.34
32000.00:
17500.00
30000.00
36964.00

he smashed over for scores, but was
called back once because the Varsity
held.
Bastian was used at left half against
the scrubs in the second half, and con-
tinued his excellent showing. Catlet,
Mead and Quinn were the rear trio
in the first half.
Hughitt ran the team during the en-
tire scrimmage, and starred . a
forward pass to Torbet for C,,enity
yards over the fresh goal line for the
first score.
A few minutes later Quinn made- a
fair catch on the forty-two yard line,
and Capt. Paterson booted a perfect
goal from placement. Bastian smash-
ed over for the last score against the
freshmen, after Hughitt got away for
a long run to the one yard mark.
The new bacfield men went in
against the scrubs in the second half,
and Pontius made his score before the
scrubs upset proceedings with their
fluke score.
Bentley then intercepted the scrub
toss and placed the ball within the
scoring distance. Pontius went over,
but the Varsity was penalized fifteen
yards. Bastian then took the ball over
on three plunges through the line, and
the game was over.
The teams lined up as follows:
Varsity-Torbet, Watson, LE; Mus-
ser, LT; Lichtner, McHale, LG; Pat-
erson, C; Cochran, Allmendinger, RG;
Raynsford, RT; Lyons, Tessin, RE;
Hughitt, Q; Catlett, Bentley, LH;
Quinn, Pontius, FB; Mead, Bastian,
RH.

* Larger appropriation probable later in year.
** Not including Bancroft Collections outside berkeley.

VARSITY
i-

MANAGERIAL

CANDIDATES

ANNOUNCE

PLATFORMS

The Candidates hereby pledge thepseves net # eletioneer and not to sanction electioneering by their f'ienas. (Signed) H. S. HULBERT,
Student Council.

1
t
1
3

n-- -- -4 em Ain

Walter Emmons" 114E. Herbert Muckley, '14L.
(Candidate for Baseball Manager.) (Candidate for Baseball Manager.)
As a candidate for manager of the He is heartily in favor of returning;
Varsity baseball team Walter Emmons, to the Conference under any condi-
'14E, takes the following stand 0n four tioni which can be shown to be favor-

prominent issues
1. He stands unqualifiedly for re-
turn to the Intercollegiate Conference
under the plans proposed by the nth-
letic board last Saturday night.
2. He favors the granting of a suit-
able insignia to baseball candidates
who faithfully work and remain on
the squad but who fail to make their
"cM."
3. He favors reorganiging the band,
and placing it on a sound financial and
business basis, of making its member-
ship competitive and that it should be
given at least one big trip a year.
4. He favors some arrangement
whereby men could play summer base-
ball, as it is essential for a Varsity
player to play in summer to keep in
condition,
Emmons has faithfully served on
the baseball committee.
He is a member of .the Sigma Phi
fraternity.

able to the student body and the wel-
fare of Michigan athletics.
He believes that the restrictions in
regard to Varsity baseball men playing
summer ball should be more lenient.
He advocates the granting of "Rs"
or similar insignia to members of the
Varsity baseball squad who fail to win
their "Ms."
A University band which shall play
at all athletic contests should be or-
ganized and provided for permanently
by the university authorities or ath-
letic. association. This band should
have one trip a year.
He is a member of Delta Tau Delta
Fraternity. He believes that he can
reasonably claim to have executed
faithfully all duties assigned him dur-
ing his two years service upon the
baseball committee and he promises,
if elected, to respect the sentiment of
the student body and represent it con-.
scientiously.

Ohas. A. Crowe, '14E.
(Candidate for Track Manager.)
Campus activities:
Last year-Treasurer of Engineering
society; Triangles.; assistant clerk of
Cor'nell Indoor meet; Syracuse meet
and assistant field judge of-interscho-
lastic meet; class secretary Union op-
era.
This year-Griffins; Vulcans; Michi-
gamua; member of Board in Control
of Student Publications; engineering
vice-president of Michigan Union.
Member of Phi Gamma Delta, and
Sigma Upsilon fraternities.
Platform
Favors the honor system; indorses
the present plan, as recently improved
upon, for the making of the Varsity
managerships purely competitive; fa-
vors the resumption of relations be-
tween Michigan and Conference
schools, and indorses the present plan
of action of the Board in Control of
Athletics. Favors the awarding of
baseball "R's" as in football.
Pledge myself to do conscientious
work if elected; believe that summer
baseball should not effect eligibility in
Varsity baseball.

Gordon C. Eldredge, '14.
(Candidate for Track Manager.)
Assistant Athletic Editor The Mich-
igan Daily (2) (3)-AthleticEditor (4).
Football Committee (3) Try-out Track
Managership (3). Union Opera (3).
Comedy Club (3).
Member Theta Delta Chi, Sigma Del-
ta Chi, Sphinx, Druids.
As Assistant Athletic Editor of The
Daily he wrote practically all track
news-stories during seasons of 1912
and 1913. Served as scorer in most of
home meets during this period.
He stands for Michigan's return to
Intercollegiate Conference. Believes
Miehigan can make necessary conces-
sions with dignity.
Favors athletic association support
of band until, by violation of .Confer-
ence rulings, it comes to stand in way
of Michigan's return.
Believes summer baseball should not
affect eligibility of college players. If
Michigan returns to Conference will
work to have Conference adopt favor-
able summer baseball ruling.
Favors awarding insignia to Varsity
squad baseball men who do not win
Pledges himself, if elected, to give
conscientious' attention to all duties
of office.

All-Fresh-Graven, LE; Finkbinde
LT; Rehor, LG; Neiman, C; Skinne
RG; Pierce, RT; Hubel, Zewadsl
RE; Ziger, Q; Calvin, LIH; Maulbetse
FB; Dratz, McNamara, RH.
Scrubs-Staatz, LE; Dorrance, L'
Rosa, LG; Peterson, C; Woods, R(
Rheinman, RT; McCall,' RE; Meyer
Q; McFadden, LH; Davidson, FB
Jenks, RH.
FIRST NUMBER OF GARGOYLE
WILL BE OUT SATURDA
Replete with drawings by sever
new artists as well as many new fe
tures in the humor line, The Gargoy
will make its first appearance for th
current year on Saturday. It will 1
devoted mainly to freshmen.
Owen B. Winters has written a she
story, and the Scintillator which w
featured in The Daily last year will 1
revived in the humor magazine. TI
covermdesign, depicting several re
freshmen is by Leo Burnett who wo
the Union oper poster contest la
year.

0

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