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May 09, 1914 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-09

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Fhe

Michigan

Daily

Vol XXIV, No. 154. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MIAY 9, 1914. PRICE FIVE OEN1

.-
t 1

SECOND EXHIBIT
OF, DEPARTMENT
DUE NEXT WEEK

EVENTS FOR TOOAY
Weekly ILounger, Michigan Lnion, 7:00
o'c lock.
Informal Fischer party, Michigan Un-
ion, 9:00 o'clock.
Graduation recital by Miss Marion
Struble, violinist, School of Musicl
hall, 8: 00 o'clock.j
Try-outs or Fresh and Soph relay
obstacle race, Fair grounds, 3:00
o'clock.
Girls' Educational club meeting, New-
berry hall, 3:00 o'clock.
Annual Palladium Soph prom, Gran-
ger's, 9:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

RAIN BLOCKS TILT
WITH ORANGEMEN;

Syracuse
sing

Team Leaves for East Lan-
Where They Play Lichi-
gan Aggies Today

Every Branch of Engineering Will
Have Individual Displays of Stu-
dent Work With Novel
Featurest
ALL CLASSES WILL NOT BE
DISHISSED AS ANNOUNCED
Complete Working Model of Sailt Plant
Will Show 3Manu factr
of Product
Plans for the second annual engi-
neering exhibit, which will take place
next Friday and Saturda-y, are com-
plete. Every branch of engineering
will have an individual exhibit, show-I
ing the work being done by the stu-
dents. In addition, a number of novel
features have been planned.
Contrary to an earlier announce-
a ment, all classes in the engineering
department will not be dismissed.,
Those classes with which the exhibit
interferes, will be excused, but all1
other classes will meet as usual. Full
student sections are expected to be
present in the shops during the exhib-
it, and students from other sections
are requested to come and help to
keep all the machines in operation for
display. All classes will resume Sat-
urday morning.~ .
Chairmen of the committees in charge
of the forestry exhibit have been nam-'
ed. L. G. Hornby, grad., is general
chairman. Other chairmen are: silvi-
culture, J. T. Taylor, grad.; products,
R. L. Hague, grad.; grazing, C. K. Val-
iton, grad.; technology, W. G. Ives, '14;
souvenir, Walter Bond, '14; models, C.
C. Delavan, '14, and J. D. Steere, '4;1
management, Alfred Griffin, grad.;s
protection, M. D. Murdock, grad.; pic-]
tures, C. W. Boyce, '14. ]
The chemical engineers plan to give+
over the etire lower two floors of the
chemical building to the exhibit.
Among the feature displays here will
be a complete working model of a{
salt plant, made of glass, enabling the1
visitors to see the various processes
of salt manufacture. The Goldschmitt-
Thermite company, of New York, will
have an exhibit, showing the steps in
thermite welding.
The automobile department has plan-
(Continued on page 4)
SHELTON EXPLAINS
MILITARY COURSE
Captain George H. Shelton address-
ed a small audience yesterday after-
noon in University Hall on the work-
ings of the summer military camp to
be established by the United States
army at Ludington, Mich., in July.
The five weeks' course consists of
the theoretical principles of tactics, pa-
trols, outposts and combat, all of
which will be explained by lectures
and tactical walks. Military map mak-
ing and road sketching will be ex-
plained and rifle contests held for
prizes offered by the National Rifle As-
sociation of America.
Physical drill,g marching, camping,
tent pitching, making and breaking
camp, field cooking and sanitation,first
aid to the injured and the .field care of
troops will constitute special pro-
grams. Upon completion a record of
the work done will be filed at Wash-
ington with personal notes as to fit-
ness for future command. Strict army
regulations will be enforced at camp
under the direction of regular army
officers.

Girls' Glee club concert, Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Junior-freshman girls' luncheon, Mich-
igan Union, 12:00 o'clock.
Weekly membership dance, Michigan
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Final fresh and soph relay obstacle
race tryouts, Fair grounds, 9:00
o'clock.
Varsity track meet, Ferry field, 2:00
o'clock.
Michigan-Syracuse baseball game,Fer-
ry field, 3:30 o'clock.
Michigan Union Boat club water Mar-
athon, starts at Lakeland, 10:00
o'clock.
All-FRESH SQUAD
PICKEDBY COACH
Lavans Chooses Yearling Ball i Tsers
For Game With University
of Detroit

WILL MEET VARSITY SATURDAY
Rain in huge quantities caused a
cancellation of the scheduled game be-
tween Michigan and Syracuse on Fer-
ry field yesterday afternoon, and at
7:30 o'clock the Orangemen left for
East Lansing where they are billed to
clash with the Aggies today. They
will return tonight for the tilt with the
Wolverines on Ferry field tomorrow.
According to Coach Carl Lundgren,
who arrived in Ann Arbor yesterday,
there will be no double header on Sat-
urday in view of the scheduled Varsi-
ty track meet. The contract with the
easterners does not make it necessary
to play the two games, and for this
reason the Wolverine leader will prob-
ably rest content with the single bat-
tle.
Captain George Sisler or "Doc" Bari-
beau will be sent against the Orange
nine in tomorrow's game. In view of
his enforced absence from practice
during the past week, Lundgren was
unable to make a definite announce-
ment of his battery yesterday, but let
it be known that his choice would lie
between these two veterans. Baer or
Hippler will operate behind the bat.
The Michigan diamond men were
not out for practice yesterday, but will
take a work-out this afternoon provid-
ing the weather permits. The Syra-
cuse leader had his men in uniform
for a short time, however, in hopes
that the scheduled game could be play-
ed.
Girls' Educational Club to Meet Today
The Girls' Educational club will
meet in Newberry hall at 3:00 o'clock
this afternoon, to vote upon joining
the national Educational club, and to
act upon the drafting of a new con-
stitution. Louise Robson will speak
on "Switzerland" and Evangeline An-
schutz will give her experiences as a
teacher in a mining camp.
Many Busrah Pledges Payable Now
Many of the pledges to the Busrah
mission fund are already due and pay-
able at the Y. M. C. A. office on State
street. The committee is anxious to get
as much of this money paid in as soon
as possible so that it can be sent to
Arabia and be used as intended.
ADELPHI DEBATES
ALPHA NU FOR CUP.
The Alpha Nu and Adelphi debating

TUESDAY SET FOR
"SWING-OUT" DAY!
In Annual Promenade Around Campus,
Seniors Will Make Debut in
Caps and Gowns
EXERCISES IN UNIVERSITY HALL
Clad in sombre black, more than one
thousand seniors from all departments
will promenade around the campus
next Tuesday afternoon in the tradi-
tional "pwing-out." After assembling
in departmental groups on the walks
between University hall and the libra-
ry, at 3 :00 o'clock, the various classes
will march into University Hall for
brief exercises.
After the invocation, President-Emer-
itus James B. Angell and President
Harry B. Hutchins will make address-
es. Bruce Bromley, '14, will sing a
solo. Following the program, the
march -around the campus will take
place, the order of march being deter-
mined by the order of establishment
of the different departments in the
university. Waldo E. Fellows, presi-
dent of the senior lits, and Paul Blan-
shard, chairman of the lit cap and
gown committee, will lead the proces-
sion, the lits being followed by the
engineers, medics, laws, pharmics,
homeops and dents.
DEAN WORCESTER TO SPEAK
TO ZOOLOGISTS THIS MORNING
Dean C. Worcester, ex-Secretary of
the Interior for the Philippine Islands,
will be in Ann Arbor today and will
make an address before the members of
the Zoological Journal club, his sub-
ject being some phase of Philippine
Zoology. After the meeting, he will
attend the regular weekly luncheon of
the Zoology faculty at the Michigan
Union.
COMIMERCE CLUB AIEMBERS GO
ON INSPECTION TRIP TODAY
Prof. David Friday, of the depart-
ment of economics will be the speaker
at a dinner tendered to the members
of the Commerce club by the Detroit
Chamber of Commerce this noon. He
will speak on the "University and
Public Control." Following the din-
ner Professor Friday will conduct the
students through the offices of the
American Blower Company where they
will make a special study of the cost
accounting system in use by that con-
cern.
SOCIETY TO ADMIT
PUBLIC TO LECTURE
For the first time in the history of

GIRLS - CLUB FE1 ATLTRES
SPECIAL UTBERS SATURDAY
One of the numbers to be presented
by the Girls' Glee club at 8:00 o'clock
Saturday night in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, is taken from the Junior
Girls' play. The piece, "Castles, Fairy
Castles" was written by Helen Malcom-
son, and will be presented by Alice

Lloyd and Romaine Bramwell
tume.
Another feature will be the
number on the program, "A
from College Life." Tickets
obtained from any member of
ganization for 35 cents.

in cos-] 1.

Beach Carpenter, '14, News Ed
of The Daily for the Past Year,
Chosen Managing Editor
for 1914-1915

BOARD ELECTS
HEADSOF'4-15
PU BLICATION,

second
Scene
can be
the or-

M'NAMARA

PROBABLE

! ._,___ ._. w_ ____ ___ . _.___,.__w

PITCHER1

UTNDERCLASSMEN TO TRYOUT
FOR OBSTACLE RELAYS TODAY
Freshmen and sophomores will be
given opportunity to tryout for the re-
lay obstacle races from 3:00 to 5:301
o'clock this afternoon, and from 9:001
to 12:00 o'clock tomorrow morning at
the Fair grounds. As 48 men will
have to be selected from each class#
for the three teams, the student coun-
cil urges the underclassmen to turn
out in large numbers.
Guild to Hold "Weenie" Roast TonightE
The Baptist Young Peoples' Guildl
will hike to Beefsteak. Hill this even-
ing, meeting at the Guild house at 6:30
o'clock. "Weenies will be roastedl
over the camp fire.
SHIFTS ARE MADE l
IN TRACK SQUAD
Smith to Appear in Hurdles and Fox
to Run Two Mile in Varsity
Meet Saturday
CH ANGE MAY STRENGTHEN TEA3II
Some unexpected shifts have been
made in the Varsity squad that will be
tried out tomorrow at the Varsity
track meet. Smith, the star sopho-
more sprint man has been turned into
a low hurdler, and Fox, the second
year miler, will make his initial ap-
pearanceein the role of a two'.mile
runner.
The shift of Smith to the low hurdles
is explained by the weakness of the
Varsity in this event, last Saturday,
against Cornell. Smith, in addition to
his speed, has good form through the
sticks and with this combination
should make a serious contender for
a first place in the Syracuse meet, a
week from tomorrow. He probably
will appear also in the two sprints this
week end.
The heavy drizzle yesterday did not
interfere with the practice session,
"Steve" disregarding the downpour, as
far as a letup for his men was concern-.
ed. Today's orders call for a restin
preparation for the coming competi-
tion,and it is likely that none but the
jumpers and weight men will get into
suits.
TEN FRESHMAN LAWS CHOSEN
LAST NIGHT FOR WOOLSACK

W. S. FIELD,'15; SELECTED AS
BUSINESS MANAGER OF PAPER
Michiganensian, Gargoyle and Student
Directory Offices Filled
for Next Year
H. Beach Carpenter, '14, for the past
year news editor of The Michigan Dai-
ly, was elected managing editor for
1914-1915 at a meeting of the board
in control of student publications yes-
terday. W. Sherwood Field, '15, an as-
sistant to the business manager, was
chosen as business manager for The
Daily. These are the two highest offices
on the student newspaper, all the oth-
er staff appointments being made by
these two executives in their respect-
ive departments, with the board's ap-
proval.
Editor-elect Carpenter has been a
member of The Michigan Daily staff
for the past'three years, serving as re-
porter, night editor and news editor in
that time. Carpenter will return to
the university next year to enter the
law department. Field has been on
the business staff of The Daily for the
past two years, and won his post yes-
terday in close competition.
W. B. Thom, '15, was elected manag-
ing editor of the 1915 Michiganensian
at the meeting of the board; -with Paul
M. Godehn, '151,, as business manager,
Both these men were members of the
staff which prepared the university
annual for publication this year and
were elected chiefly on their showing
in the competition, for places.
Harry G. Gault, '15, was chosen as
business manager of the Gargoyle, by
the board in control, his candidacy be.
ing unopposed. No election to the
.managing editorship of the humor
magazine was made by the board, ac-
tion being deferred until a future meet-
ing.
Other appointments included the
choice of George C. Caron, '14, as man-
aging editor of the Student Directory
with W. H. Peck, '15L, as business
manager. Tlfese appointments were
also made from a large field of com
petitors.
SENIOR *RECEPTION
OFFICERS CHOSEN

All-Fresh Coach Johnny Lavans yes-
terday announced the. make-up of the
squad of yearling ball tossers which
he will take with him to Detroit to-
morrow, for the first clash of the 1917
diamond season, the game with the
University of Detroit. The men picked
are Maltby, Krause, McNamara, Nor-
rington, Niemann, Johnson, Rowan,
Gardner, Flynn, Payette, Thomas, Tay-
lor, McConahy and Schmidt.
The final practice for the youngsters
will be staged this afternoon. Lavans
announces that this drill will be held
even if it has to be run off in a driv-
ing rain, and it is expected that a full
complement of players will be out.
McNamara is the probable choice
for mound work against the universi-
ty lads in Detroit. This fresh football
star of last fall has been particularly
effective in all his appearances against
the Varsity batsmen, and the coach is
expecting him to duplicate when he
meets the Detroiters. Flynn may be
given a chance in view of his wonder-
lful performance against the Wolver-
ines on Wednesday. Krause will be
behind the bat.
The youngsters leave tomorrow
morning over the Michigan Central at
9:37 o'clock.
Freshman Injures Back in Practice
Examination yesterday of F. L. Hop-
kinson, '17, whose back was injured in
foot-ball practice at Ferry field last
Tuesday afternoon, disclosed that he
was suffering from a severe strain of
the back and not a fractured back as
was thought to be the case. Hopkinson
will not enter into practice for a week
at least.
Seniors Visit :Detroit Company Today
Senior dents and senior homeops
will visit Parke Davis Company's lab-
oratories and farms in Detroit today,
leaving in a special M. C. coach at
11:12 o'clock. They will be entertain-
ed by the Parke Davis people at a ban-
quet in the evening.

teams will clash at 8:00 o'clock to- the local chapter, the annual Phi Beta

night in the annual Cup debate which
is to be held in University Hall. These
two teams were picked for the final

Kappa address will be open to the
public, with free admission. Dr.
George F. Woodberry of Boston, Mass.,
will deliver the oration at 4:15 o'clock

debate in the preliminaries recently t this afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell

held, when Alpha Nu defeated the
Websters and Adelphi was victorious
over the Jeffersonians.
Victor Sugar, '15, Harry .G. Gault,
'15, and N. E. Pinney, '16, will repre-
sent the Adelphis. The Alpha Nu team
is composed of E. J. Engle, '14, M. C.
Briggs, '14, and L. J. Fries, '15. All
who take part have had considerable
experience in debating, and a strong
contest is expected.
"That immigration should be further
restricted" is the question on which the
teams will argue. Judge Justice John-
son, of the Philippine Islands, will be
the presiding officer. Admission is 25
cents, or by Oratorical association
course tickets.

hall, in Barbour gymnasium.
Prof. R. M. Wenley, president of the
Michigan chapter, who is largely re-
sponsible for the open meeting innova-
tion says:
"There is every reason why the hall
should be filled, none -why it should
not. The plan of having the annual
address open to the public is still in
the experimental stage. The new de-
parture has been taken, and only a
large attendance can justify the action.
"Dr. Woodberry, who gives the ad-
dress, stands almost alone among the
really eminent literary critics of'
America. Like the previous Phi Beta
Kappa orators, he is a man of real em-
inence and distinction."

Woolsack, the honorary junior law
society, elected the following' fresh
laws last night on a basis of scholar-
ship: R. 0. Brownell, L. M.
Clift, E. R. McCall, C. B. Marks,
W. L. Miller, Will Shafroth, W. W.
Schroeder, L. M. Sprague, M. Wein-
berger, Renville Wheat. These men
will elect ten more 1916 laws in the
fall.
Tailfln Memorial Will Arrive Soon
The Tappan bronze, a memorial to
Michigan's first president, which is to
be unveiled alumni day of commence-
ment week, is expected to arrive this
week. Carl Bitter, the sculptor, will
superintend its setting.

Frank L. Stephan, '14L, was elected
general auditor of the senior reception,
to be held in the gymnasium, Tuesday,
June 23, Frances E. Seuear, '14M, was
elected general secretary and H. Beach
Carpenter, '14, was chosen general
treasurer, at a meeting of the chair-
men of the various departments last
night. The laws will have charge of
the decorations, the medics arrange
for the music, the lits will plan the
general arrangements and the recep-
tion, and the engineers will handle the
invitations.
According to R. D. Wiley, '14E, gen-
eral chairman, Waterman gymnasium
will be used for dancing,. and refresh-
ments will be served in Barbour gym-
nasium. The Fgalleries will be thrown
open to spectators at an admission
price of 50 cents. The program pro-
vides for a reception, followed by the
grand march and dancing. Tickets
will be on'sale in about two weeks for
(Continued on page 4)

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