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April 28, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-04-28

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1914.

PRICR EFIVE

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EVENTS FOR TODAY

FOR

Engineering social club dance,
igan Union, 9:00 o'clock.

Mich-I

y Will Have New
place Honde
Torn

BILL

Plans-Build-
Adjacent

report that work on
building will start in
cessitating the demol-
present homeopathic
cement was made yes-
board of regents of the
approved plans for a
ic building, to be
rounds of the homeo-
No definite action will
er, until the state leg-
a January to vote the

Prof. E. H. Kraus lectures in Mineral-
ogical laboratory, 4:00 o'clock.
Graduation recital by John Meldrum,
Hill auditorium, 4:15 o'clock.
Dean J. R. Effinger lectures in Tappan
hall, 5:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Mathematics club meets in room 101,
N. W. University hall, 3:00 o'clock.
Senior engineer class dinner, Michigan
Union, 6:00 o'clock.
Commerce club smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:00 o'clock
Student's recital, School of Music, 4:15
o'clock.
EX-MAYOR BAKER
TO ADDRESS LAWS
Former Cleveland Official Will Speak
Before Order of the Coif
on Thursday,
IS EXPERT IN CIVIC AFFAIRS
Newton D. Baker, ex-mayor of Cleve-
land, and city solicitor under the fam-
ous Tom Johnson, will deliver the an-

WATCH YOUR STEP!
;- 17
4/
r[ (.
a' /
}1
* *ffln4 fl-r~.......

of the plans
s known that
ill be erected
)0,000. The
the hosnital

on

_-t

nent is rr
dental bu
be held

al nual public address under the auspices
has of the Order of the Coif, the schtlastic
de- fraternity of the law department, on
king Thursday afternoon at 4:00 o'cloclk in
new room G, of the law building. Mr. a-
oba- ker will speak on "Some Problems of
an Executive in the Administration of
nov- Law." The address is open to the p b-
ild- lie and is free.
for Previous to his public service in
Cleveland municipal affairs, Mr. Balker
served as private secretaryt to Con-
gressman Wilson, the author of! the
CIL Wilson tariff bill. After retirement
from this position, he entered upon the
For practice of law in Cleveland. Mr. Ba-
ker is a graduate of Johns Hopkins
and Washington and Lee Universities.

NAME MEN FOR
UNION OFFICES;
ELECTMAY 16
Nominating Committee Makes Annual
Report; Four Candidates
For Presidency Are
Selected
"NO ELECTIONEERING" RULE
TO GOVERN ALL BALLOTING

SISLER TO BE

MOUND CHOICE
FOR TOMORROW
Coach Lundgren Will Prepare Star to
Take Regular Turn in Box
in Harder Games.
to Come
ivIIJV AY GAME'WITH CASE,
A T CLOSE OF CORNELL MEET

PLANS TO
EFORE COUN
iy Be Called
ification of

Petitions May Add New Nominees
List; Lay Down Suffrage
Rules

to I Varsity.

Held to a Tie by Reserves in
Yesterday Afternoon's
Practice

FORESTERS' PACK TRAIN TO
START FOR CAMP ON FRIDAY
Annual Field Day to Last Three Days;
Tents Will Be Pitched For
150 Woodsmen
The fifth annual Foresters' Field
Day, conducted by the Forestry club
on the Third Sisters' lake, will start
next Friday noon, when the pack train,
loaded with provisions, will leave
the economics building for the camp-
ing grounds. Camp will not be brok-
en until Monday morning.
President Hutchins, Regent J. E.
Beal and Professor Filibert Roth will
be among the guests of honor. Nearly
150 foresters and guests will be in at-
tendance
The Forestry club will have an ade-
quate number of extra tents pitched
for students who care to join in the
celebration and grub may be obtained
at cost at the commissariat. Members
of the Forestry club are urged to bring
their membership cards.
GILMAN, 14, HEADS
Y.MC.A, FOR 1915
All Candidates Are Elected by Small
Majorities; Sophs Fill Most
of Offices
MAJESTIC CROWDS AVERAGE 50
A. E. Gilman, '14, was elected presi-
dent of the University Y. M. C. A., by
a majority of five votes, over Paul C.
Wagner, '16E, in' the annual election
yesterday. The . whole election was
close, not one man winning by a great-
er majority than 25 votes: In the con-
test for second vice-president, N. Earl
Pinney, '16, defeated Paul E. Thomp-
son, '16L, by but one vote. The fol
lowing men were elected for the other
offices: George P. McMahon, '16, first
vice-president, Waldo R. Hunt, '16,
secretary, Ir'win C. Johnson,.'1 ,treas-
urer. These men take office on May 1.
The Y. M. C. A. secretary submitted
a report of this year's work of the as-
sociation at the Majestic meeting Sun-
day night. The 23 meetings at the
Majestic had an average attendance of
560 which does not include the big
meeting Sunday night.
BAND TO APPEAR
IN OLIVEUNIFORM
University Musicians to Stage Second
Concert on May7, in Hill
Auditorium
PROFITS GO TO HARVARD FUND
For the second time this year, the
Varsity band will stage a public con-
cert in Hill auditorium. The date and
time have finally been definitely fixed
at 8:00 o'clock, on the evening of May
7. Tickets for any part of the house
will sell for 25 cents. They will be on
sale at the Goodyear Drug Co., Wahr's,
Sheehan's,University Music House and
South University Pharmacy, after next
Monday.
The 40 new olive drab uniforms
have arrived from the outfitters, and
are now being fitted to the individual
members of the organization. They
will be worn for the first time next
Saturday, when the band will appear
in full force at the Michigan-Case
baseball game.
Several new instruments have been
purchased with the proceeds of the

last concert, including a bass drum.
The money from the May concert will
go toward the fund which will be ex-
pended in sending the band to Cam-
bridge for the Harvard game next fall.
REEVES HELPS TO EXTEND
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Prof. J. S. Reeves, of the economics
department, has returned from Wash-
ington, D. C., where he attended the
annual meeting of the American Soci-
ety of International Law. Professor.
Reeves was a member of the commit-
tee of two, which organized the sec-
tion on International Education, for
the purpose of extending the teaching
of international law.

THIRTY SENI
SELEC TEokD

PH BETAKAF

ugh several members of the re-
ation committee of the student
have been absent from Ann
for three weeks with the Glee
ndolin clubs, it is expected that
nmittee will have a somewhat
te report to submit to the coun-
its regular meeting tonight.
1 the changes are not ratified
robable that a special meeting
called, as there remain only
>re meetings of the council this
and unless the reorganization
s completed soon, it will have
postponed until next fall. Un-
.s spring contests and cap night
.tion will also be discussed to-
NG TENNIS TEAM TO
RECEIVE CLASS NUMERALS
is has created enough interest
ve the athletic association to
vorably on the motion to award
pis to the interclass champions.
eeting held yesterday it was de-
o reward tennis players with
ne prizes as are given other in-
s sports winners,and this prom-
even further increase enthu-
imong the raquet wielders.
interclass series are scheduled
muence on Saturday, May 9, and
s will be played every Saturday
g. The championship will be
on the percentage basis.
GO MERCHANT OFFERS
.ND FOR JEWISH SPEAKERS

I

TRACK MEN TRAIN
FOR COMING MEET
Slow Time at Relay Games Attributed
to Soft Condition of
Grounds

FINDS NO TWO MILERS

FARRELL

Saturday's bitter disappoih.ent has
been shoved into the past by Trainer
Farrell, and he is now bending all his
energies on the last round of prepara-
tion for the Cornell-Michigan dual
meet, this Saturday.
The wet track at Philadelphia un-
doubtedly played a part in the defeat
of the Wolverines by the Illinois four.
Jansen gave Haff, who carried the ba-
ton for the last lap, a lead of six
yards, and under ordinary conditions,
the Michigan man would have main-
tained it, according to Trainer Farrell.
Haff is a fair weather performer, and
was hampered more by the soft condi-
tion of the track than his opponent.
Jansen ran in the best time for the
Michigan team, his time being headed
only by that set up by Sanders, the
Illinois last lapper.
Kohler's defeat by McCutcheon, the
Cornell weight man, in the hammer
last Saturday, came as a surprise, and
takes away from Michigan's hopes to
win the dual meet this week end.
The two mile trials held on Ferry
field last Saturday, failed to uncover
any material of Varsity caliber at that
distance. It is probable that Trainer
Farrell will be forced to develop one of
the mile men fo long distance.
Fencers End Foil Tourney Yesterday
B. L. Mattsson, '15E, won the foil
tournament, held by the Michigan fen-
cer's club, yesterday afternoon. Ken-
neth White, '17E, and E. R. Theiss, '16,
captured second and third, respective-
ly. The three men will be awarded
the club pin..

Nominations for Michigan Union offi-
cers for the school year of 1914-15,
made by the nominating committee
last week, were announced yesterday
by Bruce Bromley, chairman.
The election will be held Saturday,
May 16, and the usual rule of "no elec-
tioneering" will prevail. Additional
nominations for any office may be made
by petition with the signatures of at
least 25 Union members. Those who
have become members of the Union
since the second week in April will
not be entitled to poll, or sign peti-
tions.
The following names were reported
by the committee:
President: H. Beach Carpenter, '14,
P. Duffy Koontz, '14, Werner Shroeder,
'14, and J. Herbert Wilkins, Jr., '14.
Recording secretary: Harold B. Ab-
bott, '15E, C. H. Lang, '15, and F. F.
McKinney, '16L.
Literary vice-president: H. G. Gault,
'15, C. H. Jenks, '15, and W. B. Thom,
'15.
Engineering vice-president: H. S.
Baxter, '15E, H. S. Parsons, '15E, and
A. T. Ricketts, '15E.
Law vice-president: K. J. Mohr, '15L,
E. H. Saier, '15L, and H. R. Schradzki,
'15L.
Medic vice-president: G. J. Curry,
'15M, and M. R. Lohman, '15M.
Combined departments vice-presi-
dent: C. P. Field, '15P, F. W. McDon-
ald, '15D, and H. J. Caulkins, Jr., '16.
Faculty members of board of direc-
tors: Prof. H. M. Bates, Dr. Reuben
Peterson and Prof. H. C. Sadler.
The nominating committee, named
by the president and approved by the
board of directors, was as follows:
Bruce Bromley, '14, chairman, Row-
land Fixel, '14L, Robert Braun, '14E,
Harold Hulbert, '14M, and Spencer
Scott, '14P.
Justice Doty Fines Freshman Speederr
Harold O. Barnes, '17E, was fined $5
and costs in Justice W. G. Doty's court
yesterday for exceeding the speed lim-
it on a motorcycle Sunday afternoon.
Barnes was arrested on W. Huron
street by Patrolman Edward Kuhn.

Following the practice on the Varsi-
ty diamond yesterday afternoon, Coach
Carl Lundgren announced that Captain
George Sisler would be his choice for
moundsman in the clash with the
Hillsdale College nine tomorrow af-
ternoon. The Wolverine leader is also
scheduled to start against the Case
Scientists on Saturday afternoon, the
coach intending that his star twirler
should get a thorough work-out in
preparation for the more strenuous
games to come.
Sisler will not be called on to twirl
throughout the game against the col-
legians, but will be relieved by either
Quaintance or Davidson before the tilt
is over. Ferguson seems to be out of
it for a few days at least. The recruit
slabman is threatened with an attack
of tonsilitis and it is feared that an op-
eration will be necessary. He was un-
able to attend practice yesterday af-
ternoon and it is feared that he will
not be in condition for tomorrow's
game.
Lundgren pitted the Varsity against
the scrubs yesterday afternoon, and
with George Sisler and Quaintance go-
ing for the big fellows, and Davidson
for the Reserves, a tie game was the
result. One score apiece was the count,
in the five innings which were played,
and some clever fielding stunts were
pulled off. . The coach had his regular
lineup in the field, with Baer behind
the bat and Labadie in left field. This
newcomer to the team managed to
clout for a perfect percentage during
the practice clash, and fielded the
same way.
The Case-Michigan game, according
to the present schedule, will be staged'
following the close of the Cornell-
Michigan track meet.
GOMBERG MADE MEMBER OF,
NATIONAL SCIENCE SOCIETY
.Prof. Moses Gonberg, of the chemis-
try department, was elected a member
of the National Academy of Science,
which held a meeting at Washington,
D. C., last week. Prfessor Gomberg is'
the. first professor'in the university to
be accorded this honor.

Nineteen Women Are Elected; Chok
For Honor Society Made
From Class of Five
Hundred
VARSITY FOOTBALLPLAYER
NUMBERED IN RECORD ROL
Prof. A. G. Canfield Named Presiden
Initiation to Be Held on
May 8
Thirty seniors of the literary de
partment were elected to Phi Be
Kappa Monday afternoon. Ninetee
of these were women, while in 1913,
the 22 elected, eight were women. 1
1912 there were twelve women electe
and ten mnen.
Elections were based on scholasti
jstandings aloiW, and the thirty electe
were thepick of the class, numberln
approximately 500. Prof. W.,A. Fra
er, of the history . department, ws
chairman of the elections committe
Those elected were
Aleck, Norma; Anderson, Julia 5,
Anschutz, Evangeline G.; Atwood Ne
lie L.; Blanshard, Paul NB.; Brad!
bury, Helen G.; Chamberlain, Kathe]
me M.; Connine, Harry .;ECornwel
Alice M.; Crossman, Leland E.; Curti
Erta A.; Everett, Edward S.; Gilma
Arthur E.; Green, Frances M.; Heat
Emma E.; Hickox, Elva H.; Johnso
Lyda H.; Koslowsky, Elisabeth B.
Mensch, Ruth E.; Munn, Glenn G.
Nicolson, Marjorie H.; Quinn, Cyril J.
Rumsey, Alice A.; Schroeder, Werne
W.; Sprague, Laurence M.; Tennan
Nettie J.; Thompson, Sarah S.; Ticlb
nor, Frances W.; Watkins, Myron W.
Wheat, Renville.
;Prof. Arthur G. Canfield was electe
president of the society for the comin
year, and Prof. John W. Bradshaw wa
elected secretary and treasurer. Pra
fessors Beman and Bonner and Dea:
Effinger were elected to the executiv
council of the local chapter.
The newly elected members will b
admitted to the society at the sprin
banquet, which will be given on Fri
day evening, May 8. Prof. George F
Woodberry of Boston, Mass., will b
the principal speaker.
ALL-FRESH TENNIS TRYOUTS
WILL BE STARTED THURSDA
Tryouts for the All-Fresh tenni
team will be held on the Ferry fiel
courts Thursday, Friday and Saturda;
of this week, and a large turnout i
expected. Beginning with next weel
regular practice will be held in prep
aration for the first match, which i
schedeuled with Albion, for Saturday
May 9.
All entries for the. tryouts must b
made in person at the Athletic associ
ation office,.not later than 5:00 o'cloc
Wednesday night. The drawings wil
be made Wendesday eveing, and th
hours at which the various contestant
are to play will be published in Thi
Michigan Daily, Thursday morning.
COSMOPOLITANS NOMINATE
EXECUTIVES FOR NEXT YEA
Nominations for officers for the Cos
mopolitan club for the coming year
have been announced as follows: fo:
president, W.C. Achi, '14, A. A. Scheer
or, '15L; for board of directors, W. II
Johnson, '16L, Fred B. Foulk, '13-'15L
Arnold Bosscher, '15D, W. S. James
'15D, L. D. Randall, '16, Gentok Naka
'16, E. S. Sy, '15, K. C. Kerwell, '17M
A.A Koumjian, '17M, and Selden S
Dickinson, '13-'15L; faculty members
Profs. J. A. C. Hildner, J. P. Bird, Ir
Harry Coe;. business men, Mr. A. E
Jennings, '89, Dr. T. L. Langford an
Mr. George Burke, '07.

CHANGES IN ABSENCE RULES
MADE BY LITERARY FACULTY
Each absence from class preceding
or immediately following, a vacatioi
or holiday will count as three absences
in the lit department. This rule was
adopted by the lit faculty at its meet
ing last night. Nine names were rec
ommended for A. B. degrees, three for
BS. and three for teachers diplomas

Announcement was .made at the
meeting of the Jewish Students' Con-
gregation on Sunday night, that Julius
Rosenwald, president of Sears-Roe-
buck Company, of Chicago, had offered
a considerable sum of money to secure
speakers and lecturers, and to assist
in meeting the running expenses of the
organization. With this increased fi-
nancial aid, the officers of the congre-
gation hope to bring many of the most
nrominent rabbis in the country to1

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